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Thread: Trailer bunks.

  1. #1
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    Default Trailer bunks.

    Need to put some bunks on trailer to help load my Kingfisher 2525. Make or buy, don't know yet. Any brands to recommend or measurements to make them. Any thoughts out there? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default bunks

    mine are 2x6 pressure treated wood covered with marine carpet. They can be made pretty easily......

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Member GOT TOYS's Avatar
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    Default trailer guides

    I bought mine from AMDS when I ordered my 2525. As AKBass said, easy to build, but I was too lazy to build my own, and the ones I bought were galvanized.
    When adjusted right, they make loading the boat a snap. Always on straight. Stevie Wonder could load it.
    Kingfisher 2525. 225, 20, and 2hp Hondas.

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    Default Geo deck material

    I am doing the trailer on my 26 footer. I looked into the geo-deck material (synthetic wood) in 2x6. It is not wood and would never rot. It looks like i"ll have to run the sander over the top surface to smooth it a bit then I plan on spraying the graphite based paint onto the bunks to make them slick. This combo will last alot longer than wood and carpet. It might be worth looking into. You might find it worthwhile in the long run.

  5. #5
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default teflon pads

    Quote Originally Posted by Tealer View Post
    I am doing the trailer on my 26 footer. I looked into the geo-deck material (synthetic wood) in 2x6. It is not wood and would never rot. It looks like i"ll have to run the sander over the top surface to smooth it a bit then I plan on spraying the graphite based paint onto the bunks to make them slick. This combo will last alot longer than wood and carpet. It might be worth looking into. You might find it worthwhile in the long run.
    Instead of painting have you considered putting teflon on your geo material?

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
    Member GOT TOYS's Avatar
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    Default trailer guides

    Here's a pic of my guides. Hope it works.

    [IMG][/IMG]
    Kingfisher 2525. 225, 20, and 2hp Hondas.

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    Default cool idea

    I'll check into the teflon too. If I do that on my trailer bunks and add a set of guides like that beuatiful "Got Toys" boat has I'll be in good shape for many many years. Thanks

  8. #8
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    Default

    Thanks for the pics. "Got Toys". Looks good, I was thinking just a short set at back, but the long one looks like it would work better.

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    Default

    That's a nice setup you have there Got Toys. Your side bunks look well positioned. That positioning will make a huge difference with loading the boat on your trailer.
    Ryan Tollefsen
    Prudential Jack White Vista Real Estate

    Alaska Real Estate
    Anchorage Real Estate

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tealer View Post
    I am doing the trailer on my 26 footer. I looked into the geo-deck material (synthetic wood) in 2x6. It is not wood and would never rot. It looks like i"ll have to run the sander over the top surface to smooth it a bit then I plan on spraying the graphite based paint onto the bunks to make them slick. This combo will last alot longer than wood and carpet. It might be worth looking into. You might find it worthwhile in the long run.
    You might consider using SlipPlate, it is sold at Graingers and probably other places. Comes in aerosol cans and is durable and very slippery indeed. I sprayed the entire bottom of my 2175 JetCraft with it. It is used primarily in truck beds and farm equipment to make things slide easier.

  11. #11

    Default

    If you use treated lumber for your bunks make sure to put UHMW plastic material to separate the wood/carpet from your aluminum hull. The chemicals used for pressure treating the wood, will corrode your hull. I've seen an aluminum hull pitted/corroded over 1/8" in a 1/4" bottom plate from sitting directly on the treated wood bunks. Carpet will not stop the chemicals from leaching out and coming into contact with the aluminum. The same goes for side guides, never let your boat rest against your guides, otherwise the same corossion issues can occur.

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    Default Makes sense

    Looks like more of a case for the Geo Deck synthetic material and sprayed on slip plate for trouble free bunks for years. Thanks for the heads-up.

  13. #13
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    Default Trailer Side Boards

    Playnow2 - It sounds like you're talking about side boards to guide your boat on the trailer not the hull supports. I bought the Big Boards from Deweys for my 26 Osprey after trying some light weight ones that were quickly bent out of shape. The Big Boards are pricey but really heavy duty and was the best $500 I ever spent! Saved me from a sure heart attack that was going to happen at the ramp!

  14. #14
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    There is really no need to use treated wood for bunks. Since they're not in the water but for loading/unloading the boat, there really is no rot problem as long as they are open to the environment (i.e. they need to be able to dry out). Just some standard 4x4 or 4x6 beams on top of the trailer frame with carpet covering the top and most of each side will last for decades (this from personal experience). Don't wrap carpet all the way around so the water can easily drain away.

    And if you're just talking the side guides, then there really is no reason for treated wood as these areas dry out even faster than the bottom bunks. Some standard 2x6 is what you want here. Add a little bit of flare aft to give more of a "funnel" effect and keep the top edge well below the gunnels, especially if you load in cross currents.

    About the only thing I've ever done to any bunk wood is to hit it with a coat of waterproof deck sealer or exterior house paint if you want some color coordination with the boat or trailer. Let that completely dry before putting on the carpet. Then just tack on the carpet with galvanized roofing nails, keeping them away from any contact with the hull.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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