Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Which Kimber Hunting Rifle???

  1. #1
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Question Which Kimber Hunting Rifle???

    I have been shopping around for a new rifle. 2 of the things that were must have for my new rifle were (1) CRF, and (2) 3 position safety which also locks the bolt. From my experience there are only a few of the manufacturers that have these options and are readily available over the counter, the Win Mod 70, Kimber, and Ruger. I own a Win mod 70 in 300 Win Mag and do not like the gun, and I have never been fond of Ruger rifles (just my opinion), so I have decided to go with a Kimber.

    I have it narrowed down to 2 models, but canít quite decide. I really wanted to go up to a .375 H&H this time. The gun will be used for moose and bear. I am not new to hunting Alaska big game, but donít consider myself an expert on guns/ballistics etcÖ

    I was hoping for some input from others.

    Option 1,

    Kimber 8400 Montana chambered in .338 win Mag

    Here are the pros and cons for my situation.

    Pros
    Lighter weight
    About 1100.00
    Sleeker look
    Better long range capabilities

    Cons
    not the caliber I wanted (but plenty for moose and bear)
    Recoil?? Is it less or more than the .375 H&H?

    Option 2,

    Kimber 8400 Talkeetna chambered in .375 H&H


    Pros
    .375 H&H
    Recoil?? Is it less or more than the .338?
    More knock down power

    .
    Cons
    $2000.00
    Heavier
    Have sights on it which isnít bad, but not one of my requirements.
    Worse long range capabilities?

    These are just a few of my observations. If I go with the .338 I am still upgrading, but not exactly what I wanted. Is the .375 any better than the .338? I guess I will just throw this out there and we can fill in the blanks as the discussion moves forward.

    Thanks in advance for any help and suggestions. Every time I think I have made a final decision, something makes me go back and forth between the 2 guns. I just want to do everything I can to make the right decision.

  2. #2

    Default

    6 or 1/2 dozen....theres really no difference between the two other than one comes with iron sights and it also cost about $800 or so dollars more. It sounds like you just need to decide what caliber you want to hunt with, 338WM or 375 H&H. If you dont reload 338WM ammo will provide you more options in factory fodder than the 375 H&H will and it will not cost quite as much either. Will 99% of Alaskas game be able to tell you the difference between the two when shot? Nope, they both kill well.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Since you want a 375 so bad why not buy the Kimber 338 and use the change to purchase a Ruger 375. Then you can have both and stay under the cost of the Kimber 375. I bet you will learn to love the Ruger.
    Tennessee

  4. #4
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Since you want a 375 so bad why not buy the Kimber 338 and use the change to purchase a Ruger 375. Then you can have both and stay under the cost of the Kimber 375. I bet you will learn to love the Ruger.
    Not a bad suggestion. I have looked at the Ruger 375 and it does interest me, but it seemed more like a brush gun or guide backup rifle. Have you shot the new ruger?? Did you like it?

    I have never shot a 375 H&H or a 338 WM. I am a one rifle kind of guy even though I have a few different calibers. 97% of my shooting is at moose, even though I was forced to shoot a grizz this season and I feel like I need a little more horsepower than the 300 WM that I am currently using.

    Is the recoil from the 338 WM and the 375 H&H a factor? I have been told that the 338 is a sharp kick and the 375 is more like a push is there any truth to that?

  5. #5
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southern Tier, New York
    Posts
    430

    Default

    [quote=northriver21;378329]

    Option 1,

    Kimber 8400 Montana chambered in .338 win Mag

    Here are the pros and cons for my situation.

    Pros
    Lighter weight
    About 1100.00
    Sleeker look
    Better long range capabilities

    Cons
    not the caliber I wanted (but plenty for moose and bear)
    Recoil?? Is it less or more than the .375 H&H?

    Option 2,

    Kimber 8400 Talkeetna chambered in .375 H&H


    Pros
    .375 H&H
    Recoil?? Is it less or more than the .338?
    More knock down power

    I have not shot either rifle, however, I have a few others, light wieght and heavier. My 375 H&H is7.5 lbs. without a scope and is managable. I think the 338 WM will kick harder than the 375, in a 6.5 lb and 8.0 lb rifle respectively.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Speak of the devil, I just ordered a Ruger 375 myself. Reason being I am left handed and Buds Guns was selling a stainless left handed version in the black laminated stock for only $616! But the rifle they were selling did not have iron sights on it. But I also own a Ruger 338 and really like the rifle a lot.
    Recoil wise I feel the 375 is a noticeable step up from the 338 in comparable designed rifles with similar stocks and weight. But opinions vary on this as well.

    Even though I own and shoot both a 338 and 375 Wby I would not feel handicapped by carrying a 338 in Alaska under any circumstances. I am just a big bore addict most of the time.

    For you right handed guys Rugers 375 comes in two versions. The Alaskan, which is the shorter barrel version with the dark stainless finish and the Hogue stock. And then the African version, blued steel and walnut stock with I think a 23 or 25 inch barrel.

    Either the 338, the 375 Ruger, or 375 H&H are close enough in performance to be splitting hairs. If you reload you can work up to the heavy loads slowly. Good luck with what ever you choose.
    Tennessee

  7. #7

    Default Option 2 gets my vote

    I have Kimber Montana's in 7mm-08, 338 Federal and 325 WSM. Great rifles! A talkeetna is on my Christmas wish list. I have seen them sell for $1650.00 on Gunbrokers. My Sako 375H&H with a 20 inch barrel was much more pleasant to shoot than any of the Ruger or Winchester 338WM's I have owned and I tip the scales at 150#. With the right load, a 375H&H can reach out there with the best of them.

  8. #8
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skilak Jim View Post
    I have Kimber Montana's in 7mm-08, 338 Federal and 325 WSM. Great rifles! A Talkeetna is on my Christmas wish list.
    Does anyone have a model 8400 or Talkeetna with a scope on it that I could at least hold and possibly shoot?


    Quote Originally Posted by Skilak Jim View Post
    With the right load, a 375H&H can reach out there with the best of them.

    How far do you feel comfortable shooting with the 375H&H?

  9. #9

    Default

    My wife has a Kimber 84M Classic in 7mm-08 and boy is that rig light and perfect for mountain hunting. I've shot both the 338 and the 375 and prefer the 375 hands down. I thought the 338 had a little more kick to it whereas the 375 had more of a hard push to it. That Talkeetna would make a killer moose and bear gun or you could always throwdown and get the Caprivi in 375 H&H.

  10. #10
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45 View Post
    My wife has a Kimber 84M Classic in 7mm-08 and boy is that rig light and perfect for mountain hunting.
    While I was out shopping for guns with my 9 yo son I handed him an 84M Montana (Stainless/Synthetic) in 338 federal. His eyes got big as saucers. "Wow this is light" he said. I think an 84M might be his first gun. My wife also has a 7mm-08 in the Remington model 7 that he will probably inherit, but I really wanted for him to have a 300 WSM for his first kill. For now the 84M doesn't come chambered for any WSM cartridges just the 8400 WSM which is a bigger gun than the 84M. If it did we would have an easy decision. Maybe when I get really serious about his first gun, we can get together and let him try your wife's 84M?

    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45 View Post
    I've shot both the 338 and the 375 and prefer the 375 hands down. I thought the 338 had a little more kick to it whereas the 375 had more of a hard push to it. That Talkeetna would make a killer moose and bear gun or you could always throwdown and get the Caprivi in 375 H&H.

    This is what I'm hearing more often than not about the 338 vs 375. I plan on shooting the new gun quite a bit to get familiar with it. In my younger days I shot a lot more and became a very good shot. Now I don't shoot near as much and have noticed the difference. The reason recoil is a factor is for that very reason. If I was just going to shoot it a couple times a year (like I have been doing) it wouldn't matter much. As far as getting the Caprivi, it has to be stainless/synthetic for me. The wood blued guns don't look to good after a few seasons of me carrying them. LOL

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    If anyone is looking for a Kimber Montana 7mm/08 I am selling one. It has only been shot about 20 times and looks like new
    Tennessee

  12. #12

    Default

    I don't shoot my 375 H&H all that much, usually a month or 2 before hunting season and hopefully, during so I have no issues with recoil. I have the blued version in a synthetic stock but I need to get the barrel coated before I take her out for some serious hunting. I'm sure the wife would have no problem letting your son shoot her rifle, just gotta be careful not to scratch it as the wood on it is pretty darn nice for a factory rifle. Any particular reason why you want the 300 WSM and not the 7 WSM?

  13. #13
    Member chriso's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    810

    Default I think you ought to get them both!

    In consecutive serial numbers to boot!

    Seriously, I dont think you can go wrong with either.

  14. #14
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Recoil table

    Here's a nice recoil table: http://www.chuckhawks.com/recoil_table.htm.
    Takes wt of rifle into account.
    Won't help with brands, but helps with an idea comparing Ft-lbs energy.

    30-06: 17, 20

    300WM: 26
    338WM: 32, 33
    375HH: 36

    416Rigby: 58

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    I can't say I've done side by side comparisons with like rifles, but I did have a mid 80s mod 77 in 300 win mag & same generation Interarms whitworth in 375 H&H & shoot them side by side. The Ruger in 300 could give me an ach in the shoulder in less than 20 rds that I know wasn't helping my shooting. I could shoot at least 2x as many rounds in the 375 before I felt it. Definetly sharp kick in the 300 vs heavy shove in the 375. How much was cartridge & how much was rifle I couldn't say.
    That said, I think the 338 would serve you well. Better yet, split the difference & get a 358 NM put together on the Montana action! Best of both worlds (if you reload. Double Tap has great ammo at a reasonable(??) price if you don't).
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  16. #16
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Default Update.

    Just a little update, I broke down and bought the Kimber Talkeetna.

    I am both exited and disappointed with the rifle. It is very well balanced and fits me perfect. I like everything about it except it does not feed smooth.

    I picked up a box of ammo and was cycling it through when I noticed it was very rough feeding. The 1st and 4th round would sometimes bind up and I really have to push the bolt to get it to feed. This was denting the cartridge below it in the mag.

    I also noticed that the action is really scratching the casings.

    I sent the rifle back to Kimber before ever shooting it. So far I have not been overly impressed with Kimber customer service. They say send it in and we'll look at it but no real concern from them in any of the conversation to date.

    From what I am gathering from talking to others is that mine is a isolated problem not the norm.

    I am keeping my fingers crossed that Kimber will make this right.

    I'll attach a few pics of the bullets. Its hard to get good detail, but hopefully you'll get the idea.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Default More Pics

    Here are 2 more pictures. What do you think?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South East Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by northriver21 View Post
    Here are 2 more pictures. What do you think?
    Northriver21

    I have just bought the same rifle. I made up 4 dummy rounds & had a good play with it and it seems to feed well -no problems in that area as yet.

    But it is marking the cases very slightly - not enough for me to worry about though.

    If you get it back from Kimber and its still causing you stress I would take it to a Gunsmith & get him to polish the feed rails & ramp. That is probably what Kimber will do anyway.

    Its minor stuff - but those problems should not be found on a rifle costing that sort of money.

    I hope you get it sorted quickly. It should be a good, tough rifle. I look forward to getting mine to the range in the next 10 days or so for its first outing.....

  19. #19
    Member northriver21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mlg View Post
    I have just bought the same rifle. I made up 4 dummy rounds & had a good play with it and it seems to feed well -no problems in that area as yet.
    That's good to hear. The problem for me is there are not many Talkeetna owners out there to compare stories with yet.


    Quote Originally Posted by mlg View Post
    If you get it back from Kimber and its still causing you stress I would take it to a Gunsmith & get him to polish the feed rails & ramp. That is probably what Kimber will do anyway.
    I did take it to my local gunsmith and that's what he told me, "he would just polish it up a bit". Since its under warranty I wanted Kimber to do the work.



    Quote Originally Posted by mlg View Post
    Its minor stuff - but those problems should not be found on a rifle costing that sort of money.
    I couldn't agree more. When you spend this much $$$ you expect a little more from the manufacturer. I own less expensive that don't have this problem. I am reserving judgment now and giving Kimber the benefit of doubt that they will make this right.

    Thanks for the reply.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Delta Jct, Alaska
    Posts
    992

    Default

    I intend to get a new 375 (even at my age) and the Talkeetna has all the features I desire in a new rifle. I had four 375s until recently and all but the pre64 70 would scar the brass especially the 700....CZ was so-so for feeding but a heavy, clunky rifle. I was able to improve feeding on the Sako to where it didn't scar the brass.

    I have two Kimber Montana WSMs and they smoothed up fairly well for that type of cartridge....

    Please keep us posted on your results.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •