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Thread: 97 skidoo tundra fuel leak

  1. #1
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    Default 97 skidoo tundra fuel leak

    My 97 tundra has a fuel "leak". When I pull the starter fuel spurts from a tiny hole in the top of the fuel pump. Has anyone else experienced this problem? It is still getting fuel to the cylinder, so that isn't a problem. It seem like the hole is supposed to be there, but I can't imagine it is normal for fuel to be spurting all over the place.

    thanks for any advice.

  2. #2

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    Your right and it is very dangerous to continue to operate it. The bleed hole is there to tell you when a diaphragm has failed in the pump. You can replace the pump or take it apart and repair it with all new parts. Both are real easy fixes. I would not ride it until I got it fixed.
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  3. #3
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    If you buy a new pump it will do the same thing!!!!

    You have a stuck needle in yor carb. Disassemble and clean.

    It just happened to me.........

    Thanks to Team CC service in Eagle River for the answer.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    If you buy a new pump it will do the same thing!!!!

    You have a stuck needle in yor carb. Disassemble and clean.

    It just happened to me.........

    Thanks to Team CC service in Eagle River for the answer.
    Hey thanks. I have never seen nor heard of that condition making the weep hole drain. But I can relate how it could happen. I will personally keep this in mind. More often, I have seen ice in the pumps or diaphragm failing. I have seen quite a few damaged diaphragms and needles from what I think is related to using the wrong kind of Heet in the fuel. Rep to you for this tip.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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  5. #5
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    Default Rebuild the pump

    Mine did the same thing last year and a rebuild fixed it. I did not have to touch the carb at all. A very easy fix.

    Dave

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    Default This happened to me too.

    Probably the most common problem with any Tundra II operated in sub-zero temperatures. A new diaphram for you fuel pump costs less than $14 and takes about 10 minuets to replace once the fuel pump is removed from chasis. Just make sure you do it in a warm garage to avoid frostbite and goodluck.

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    I took apart the carb today and cleaned it up. It is a used machine that I just purchased, so I figured it would be worth looking at anyway. The carb and needle looked fine. Also, I took apart the fuel pump. The diaphram looked fine. I couldn't find any holes. Unfortunately, my favorite shop in fairbanks didn't have a rebuild kit in stock, so I'll wait until next weekend to put it all back together. I also checked the compression, which was around 130 psi after 3 pulls. I don't know much about what it should be, but this seems like it is within a reasonable range to me. I'll reply again next week after I rebuild the fuel pump and tell everyone if it worked.

    Thanks for the replies!

  8. #8
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    Default Fixed!

    I cleaned up the carburator and rebuilt the fuel pump, but the Tundra II was still difficult to start and fuel was still spurting from the little hole in the top ogf the fuel pump. When I first had this problem, it was because I inadvertantly flooded the engine. In retrospect, this may have been the problem all along. Anyway, today when I couldn't get it started I pulled the plug and turned over the engine a couple of times. Then I replaced the plug and tried to start it again (fuel still spurting). After a couple of times of this and playing with the throttle, it started. After that, it starts every time and I no longer have the problem fuel spurting out of the little hole in the fuel pump. My guess is that pressure somehow built up in the line (black hose) leading from the engine to the top of the fuel pump and it was causing this problem. I think these were all symptoms of flooding the engine. Anyway, I got it started and I learned a lot about my Tundra II. I'll keep an eye on that fuel pump because I realize that if it continues spurting fuel, that this is dangerous. Thanks for the comments.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by akgeneticdrifter View Post
    I cleaned up the carburator and rebuilt the fuel pump, but the Tundra II was still difficult to start and fuel was still spurting from the little hole in the top ogf the fuel pump. When I first had this problem, it was because I inadvertantly flooded the engine. In retrospect, this may have been the problem all along. Anyway, today when I couldn't get it started I pulled the plug and turned over the engine a couple of times. Then I replaced the plug and tried to start it again (fuel still spurting). After a couple of times of this and playing with the throttle, it started. After that, it starts every time and I no longer have the problem fuel spurting out of the little hole in the fuel pump. My guess is that pressure somehow built up in the line (black hose) leading from the engine to the top of the fuel pump and it was causing this problem. I think these were all symptoms of flooding the engine. Anyway, I got it started and I learned a lot about my Tundra II. I'll keep an eye on that fuel pump because I realize that if it continues spurting fuel, that this is dangerous. Thanks for the comments.
    By the sound of it (if the diaphragm isn't broke?) the needle valve is stuck or sticking in your carburetor causing gas to "continuously" run into you base and exiting through the base to pump hose, remove the bottom cover and float, take out the needle valve (careful not to loose the little spring) and brass thingy what the valve sets in and inspect carefully, clean and put back, if this does not solve your problem the needle valve may be worn excessively and you may need a new one, I've seen the tundras wear these out before from vibration, good luck.

  10. #10
    Member Jktimm's Avatar
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    Default Congratulations on getting this fixed!

    Way to go! One other thing you may want to consider. If you install a fuel line shut off before the fuel pump, and use it between trips, then fuel cannot run past the needle / seat, or past the fuel pump charging line. No matter what happens, the machine won't flood on you. You can get a cheap used one from any machine, and may save you lots of tugging on a rope. Happy Trails!

  11. #11

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    Dug this thread up.. thought I'd second or third the stuck needle valve.. my diaphragm was fine... on the fuel pump(a broken one will also cause the fuel pump to weep out that hole).. so will the stuck needle valve..


    tricky..

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