Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Tent stoves

  1. #1
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    985

    Default Tent stoves

    For my winter camping trips out here in bush Alaska I made this woodstove out of an evinrude 6-gallon metal gas can. Most of the campers I know out here use this basic design. Works really well with 4" stove pipe, I usually use 3 pipes for my 8x10 ft whitewall canvas tent. When I am mounting the stove jack I place it on the left side roof panel of the tent, near the entry. This type of woodstove really heats up a tent in no time at all, sure beats using a coleman campstove especially when it is below zero.
    In the evening before dark I usually go out and cut a lot of dry firewood to last me throughout the evening and part of the morning. With the flip up cover on the stove makes loading wood easy to do. This type of stove can also boil a pot of water quickly and you can even cook your meals right on top of it too. Here is a photo.
    Last edited by Nukalpiaq; 01-04-2009 at 13:50.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    SW,Ak
    Posts
    182

    Default

    Nothing better or easier.

  3. #3
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default I've seen this before

    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    For my winter camping trips out here in bush Alaska I made this woodstove out of an evinrude 6-gallon metal gas can. Most of the campers I know out here use this basic design. Works really well with 4" stove pipe, I usually use 3 pipes for my 8x10 ft whitewall canvas tent. When I am mounting the stove jack I place it on the left side roof panel of the tent, near the entry. This type of woodstove really heats up a tent in no time at all, sure beats using a coleman campstove especially when it is below zero.
    In the evening before dark I usually go out and cut a lot of dry firewood to last me throughout the evening and part of the morning. With the flip up cover on the stove makes loading wood easy to do. This type of stove can also boil a pot of water quickly and you can even cook your meals right on top of it too. Here is a photo.
    I''ve also seen it with the kicker tank turned upside down, and the filler hole turned into a draft using an elbow affair and tin can. I think they just had a hole to put the stove pipe down into. What did you use for your stove pipe collar? I wonder what kind of legs could be put under such a stove.

  4. #4
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Thanks for the post...

    Simple design and field-tested.
    Good idea! Thanks.

  5. #5
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    985

    Default

    for the collar i scavenged a part from an old discarded toyostove, don't recall exactly what part it was though. for a stand bet a person could easily design folding legs.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •