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Thread: Where in alaska?

  1. #1
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    Default Where in alaska?

    I have had the desire to live in alaska my entire life! I want to buy a piece of land and build a simple cabin and out house. I have lived in a cabin with no running water or electricity before while working on a farm. I am currently living in germany and in the army. I was planning on taking a trip to alaska around may and look for some land but do not know where to start looking. I have looked at the DnR and U alaska sites but need to see the land to make sure it is what I want. I would like the land to have good hunting with lots of moose. I am a avid backpacker and am tired of imagining what it would be like to live my dream. I am finally in a financial situation that I can start living my dream. The cabin featured on the Antler Works website is ideal to me and I would love land in just that type of area. I find myself staring at that website almost everyday lately. I believe that is close to fairbanks but am unsure. Well could anyone inform me of a good region to start looking as I will only have 2 weeks to spend looking. If I do not find land then I will be back in alaska for a month this time next year. Living simple is something I am used to but living in a place like alaska is something I am not. I would like to build my cabin and eventually spend an entire year living there. Access is another big concern but I know that is dependent upon the lot itself, not the region I am looking in. I am ramballing but if anyone could help me figure out what part of alaska I should look in?

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    Default Here's a website

    Kaizar,

    I'm in a similar situation. I was doing a little armchair wilderness living and ran across this site... you may have already seen it.

    http://www.remoteproperties.com/

    Good luck.

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    There are lots of areas that meet your needs, but I would highly recommend visiting a time or two to narrow down your area preferences. Keep in mind things like access to transportation, groceries, fuel and what not. Last year, there was a fellow selling acreage on the Kenai Peninsula, a generally crowded part of Alaska, but it was 8 miles from the nearest road, on a lake, cabin already built and looked nice, and moose all around. VERY tempting, but would only work as a vacation site or for someone who's retired ...the 8 miles by 4-wheeler or snow machine, or the sloppy in between seasons is enough to guarantee a lot of variation on how long it takes to get in/out and sometimes not getting in or out. But, if you make small compromises then you can find deals that offer the best of both worlds. For example, if you live in the White Mountains area 30+ miles north of Fairbanks, then you can be pretty remote, have your hunting, zero property taxes (much of Alaska has no property taxes), and a 40 minute drive to town where you work... or if you end up working the (coming) gasline or the oil pipeline, then you may find you only drive to town occasionally. It's certainly possible to find the place you want and I wouldn't restrict yourself to a "super remote" requirement... there is nowhere in Alaska that doesn't have people living there somehow. It's not like the old days, and the trade offs for trying to make it so can be quite large. If you really DO want that kind of thing, then northern Canada probably has a lot more remote areas available. Alaska is too "on the charts" when it comes to visitors, those wanting a pioneer lifestyle (not so easy to do anymore), and all the hunters/fishers that traipse all over the state. But like I said, a realistic look can net you something that's 95% or better what you want and still have the benefit of not being totally cut off. I'd try your new style of living like that first, and then decide how remote you want to be. If you live north of Fairbanks (like me), then you can get your water free at Fox Springs, or haul your own in a tank in your pick-up fairly cheaply ...lots of people do. We're on a very good well, but it's spendy to have one put in. Plenty of dry cabins around Fairbanks and surrounds... Come and try it out.

    Brian

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    Wow, you hit it on the dot this is exactly what I need to do. Thanks for the advice. I was wondering if you could send some pics of your cabin/area, or anyone else send pics, partially I want to see what other people are working with and also I just love to stare with envy! please guys keep the advice and sites coming I want as much info as I can get!

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    One thing to look at is what do you want to hunt the most and then find an area with that game in it to start your search.Fairbanks area ain't good if you are looking for coastal brown bear and deer and POW island sucks if you want bou and sheep.

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    Before buying land, be realistic with your budget and do alot of research on actual costs of building. Land that seems like a great deal because it's "off the beaten path" can cost an arm and a leg to ship building supplies out to actually build a cabin. A realistic budget for land and building materials that you can either access via road or snowmachine is $50k, but that's bottom dollar.

    May is a good time to visit because you'll get to see which areas typically have a suprising amount of snow in the early spring. It should hopefully also give you an idea of what areas are prone to flooding from spring meltoff and ice jams in rivers. Spend some time and $ visiting various areas to get a feel for the state. I hate the word diversity, but the state is tramendously diverse, and you'll be suprised at how different the terrain is around the state.

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    My actual budget is about $60k because I would like to pay for this in whole and not acquire any debt or loan payments! I would like to spend less so I do not spend everything I have!

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    Brian gave you great advice. Many folks don't realize how BIG Alaska is (1/3 the size of the US) and how different the state is in different areas. Southeast compared to Interior is like the Oregon coast compared to somewhere in the midwest for example. Different climate, vegetation, wildlife, people, access, hunting a fishing regs, taxes, etc. LOT'S to learn about different areas of the state.

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    I've never even visited Alaska but have been studying it from books internet and this message board. My impressions are

    1.) The southeast has mild temperatures, lots of large timber, and beautiful scenery. However is has near constant rain, fairly high taxes on any parcel with decent access and remote land prices are the highest per acre.

    2.) The interior has the lowest land prices per acre, no taxes on most parcels and the lowest population density. However, the interior has bitterly cold, long winters that require a significant amount of effort to obtain/process the necessary firewood each year. Also tress/timber are generally smaller

    3.) The southcentral has easy access to supplies/road system and milder winters than the northern interior though still very cold. Negatives are taxes and fairly high population.

    Alaskan's please let me know were I may be incorrect or ad to my knowledge. It's all part of the learning process.

    I watched Montana change a lot from 1987-1996 (biggest change period for the worst, by 1996 it was screwed up) And if I move to Alaska I hope to get ahead of the "progress curve" You know how the state and increasing population "makes everything better" by ruining it. This makes me most attracted to the remotest (the interior not the tundra) areas of Alaska but the reality of surviving and still enjoying it there is sobering.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    No where are the taxes high compared to the lower 49.Bush land tax in the south east is still pretty cheap.In the very south part of the S.E. it does rain alot and the top third not very much.Remember its rain that keep the streams going.I believe my five acres outside Haines was about two hundred a year for tax.For hunting the S.E. is tops with the most types of game in a given area

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    Quote Originally Posted by Headhunter View Post
    I've never even visited Alaska but have been studying it from books internet and this message board. My impressions are

    1.) The southeast has mild temperatures, lots of large timber, and beautiful scenery. However is has near constant rain, fairly high taxes on any parcel with decent access and remote land prices are the highest per acre.

    2.) The interior has the lowest land prices per acre, no taxes on most parcels and the lowest population density. However, the interior has bitterly cold, long winters that require a significant amount of effort to obtain/process the necessary firewood each year. Also tress/timber are generally smaller

    3.) The southcentral has easy access to supplies/road system and milder winters than the northern interior though still very cold. Negatives are taxes and fairly high population.

    Alaskan's please let me know were I may be incorrect or ad to my knowledge. It's all part of the learning process.

    I watched Montana change a lot from 1987-1996 (biggest change period for the worst, by 1996 it was screwed up) And if I move to Alaska I hope to get ahead of the "progress curve" You know how the state and increasing population "makes everything better" by ruining it. This makes me most attracted to the remotest (the interior not the tundra) areas of Alaska but the reality of surviving and still enjoying it there is sobering.
    For a simplifed overview that's pretty close. Except for the "but's"

    I moved here to Fairbanks from western Montana in 91. I've been back a couple times and man, it sure has changed a lot. I love Alaska and Interior winters aren't that bad. I watch the news and see the tornadoes, ice storms, hurricanes, 120 degree heat, 20 below with 50 mph winds, etc. in the lower 48 and say "man, I sure am glad I live here!"

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    Default Living away from it all...

    I always had the dream of building a cabin away from it all, and never had a clue, that living in the woods would be MORE expensive than city living.If your fortunate enough to have power and a well,the maintenence of both is now on your shoulders.When the water stops flowing, you can't call the water company and raise hell.The machines I use to access this place during the mud season, and sled I have to use all winter don't come cheap.To maintain the rigs the way they need to assure reliable transportation that won't break down is expensive.Having to travel the distance to buy food,tools and anything else, is costly.So, to sum it up, "Getting away from it all", you had better have a good steady supply of income, or you will certainly see some rough times.GR

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've heard more than one person opine that it's expensive to live in Alaska, because it's worth it.

    There is something to be said for that. Figure out where you want to live based on what activities and climate you want, and pay whatever it costs to live there. It doesn't make sense to get a cheap place to live if you find out that the hunting and fishing you dreamed about, doesn't exist where you built your dream cabin.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    In Alaska you can live very cheap or very spendy and most folks won't look down their nose at you for the choice you make.

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    I second what Amigo sayz..

    I know you can live in a tent AND be Mayor, or the like, and still be comfortable as well as respected in this state.

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    Default $$$$$$

    Be aware of the need to generate some money and know that it's darn tough in the good places and easy in the places you would end up not liking . Fairbanks and surrounding area and Anchorage , Eagle River , Wasilla are just American cities full of people hustling around chasing the almighty dollar enjoying the fancy coffee shops . I'd rather live in northern Montana , Minnesota or Idaho . Figure out a budget and double it and then find a place you can pull it off .

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    Member mit's Avatar
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    Sourdough = someone sour on Alaska and not enough Dough to leave!

    It costs alot of money to live off the land!

    When you live off the land pretty soon the land don't taste so good!

    Alaska sucks; its cold and dark, and when it isn't cold and dark the mosquito's suck the life out of you.

    There ain't nothing here for anyone
    Tim

  18. #18

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    I do not live full time in ak but do keep a place rented full time the last 3 years and made many trips before that so here is my take on it.
    1. alaska is a very big place many differant types of terrain weather etc.
    2. much of the land is unuasable year round.
    3. The road system is very small compared to anywhere else a plus in many ways.
    4. Less population for the area than most places a big plus.
    If I was in your shoes I would rent a cheap dry cabin somewhere I could get a job and not spend my budget for at least a year take road trips on your time off learn all you can and find the part of the state you like the best and suits your wants.
    When you find what you want dont be in a hurry visit it in the differant seasons what you think is perfect may be worthless to you in a differant season.
    This is just my thinking so take it with a grain of salt but another thing people either love ak or hate it and some fairly unpopulated areas in winter turn into metropolises in the summer.

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