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Thread: water in fuel

  1. #1
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    Default water in fuel

    Hi all,still working on that sled I sank in Willow.Took it around the block last night(minus the still drying seat and all seemed well.Took it out again this afternoon and it ran good for a while and then started developing a hesitation(stutter) when I opened up.Eventually it started popping out the exhaust even when trying to get the sled just to move.
    I called the Yamaha shop in Big Lake and they thought that it might be the ECU.At anyrate I pulled it back into the garage,pulled the ecu , sprayed the contacts with contact cleaner and drained the carbs.Just got back in from about 10 min of riding around the block and I still have the stutter/stumble going from 1/4 throttle to wide open,but it did seem to run better.As we speak it's sitting in the garage with the carbs draining again.My question is does this sound like water in the fuel,or a plugged fuel filter or is this somthing a ECU would do?I might add that I did'nt change the fuel filter or the plugs after it went in.Any feed back or suggestions would be gratly appreciated.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Run a bottle of "red" Heet through it. If it doesn't clear up then I'd start looking at the ECU.

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    Default ecu

    would the ECU allow it run decent sometimes and not others?When I open the throttle all the way up it will stutter and stumble for about 2-3 secs,then it will clean out and the engine will come to life.

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    +1 To What Doug said, I would change the filter and plugs myself if where mine. That would be easy and the cheapest route, Compared to what you have been though, What about the Tranny don,t forget that,

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    +1 for the RED heat. The stuttering sounds like water and not a computer problem, especially since it runs better at low speeds.

    We helped a guy out last year who augered into the big su with his 800 RMK. It took about 7-8 guys to get it out and then once it was on the right side of the ice, everyone left! My buddy and I stayed with him and his partner and I asked if he wanted me to get it running. He stared at me in disbelief and we went after it.

    It took about an hour and I had it firing (he had broken his pull cord earlier to boot....). Pulling that 800 over with the emergency strap wrapped around the clutch 100 times was a chore! It would idle OK, but with the introduction of any significant throttle, it would sputter and die. I just kept slowly working more throttle in and eventually got the last of the water out of the carbs and he drove her home.

    Gotta love 2 strokes!
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    Also spray some electrical cleaner up inside the spark plug caps. It really sounds like you still have some water in the fuel. You also need to grease the suspension really well.

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    Pulling that 800 over with the emergency strap wrapped around the clutch 100 times was a chore!
    I had to do this with a 670 Summit X. It got so bad that I offered a prime rib dinner to the guy who got it started. That improved the enthusiasm a bit

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    Default Red Heat

    Thanks Doug,Will try to go that route tomorrow if I can find any place open being the holiday and all.That sounds just like what my sled is doing.the problem seems to get better every time I get it back in the garage and drain the carbs.Looking forward to the day I get it back to the way it was......after that...no more low lands and water for me....I'm heading for the mountains....I'd rather be replacing plastic parts than all this trouble shooting!!

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    Default Tors

    Tried the Red Heet with the same results.....Runs good and as time go's by gets worse.Got onto a Yamaha website and they're telling me that this sled has a TORS system on it which is basically a rev limiter for saftey in case your throttle cable freezes.Once this happens you will only be able to run the sled @3200 or under....anything above and you will start dropping cylinders.....Which explains why it gets worse the longer I'm out there(ice forming in the throttle cable)At any rate off to the garage I go AGAIN!! Will try to dry out the cable or bypass TORS....Will keep you posted.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I found a cable lubricating tool at the Yamaha shop that is used to kind of "force" lube down the sheath. You may have to pick one up. It goes over the end of the cable and tightens down on the sheath. Then, you put the straw from your lube can into the side of it and it allows the lube to be pushed down the sheath by the pressure of the can.

    It works pretty good if your cable isn't already gummed up. You can work the cable as you put the lube to it and it works its way down.
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerimiah Johnson View Post
    Tried the Red Heet with the same results.....Runs good and as time go's by gets worse.Got onto a Yamaha website and they're telling me that this sled has a TORS system on it which is basically a rev limiter for saftey in case your throttle cable freezes.Once this happens you will only be able to run the sled @3200 or under....anything above and you will start dropping cylinders.....Which explains why it gets worse the longer I'm out there(ice forming in the throttle cable)At any rate off to the garage I go AGAIN!! Will try to dry out the cable or bypass TORS....Will keep you posted.
    The first thing I used to do with Yamaha sleds was to bypass the throttle override. It's easy to do and will eliminate the stuttering if the problem is in the throttle safety circuit. Or you could take a rubber band and hold the throttle open while the sled sits out overnight. If it freezes open? Pull it into the garage and thaw it out, then deal with it.

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    Default Update

    Just got back from another trip around the block.Sprayed all the Tors connections with contact cleaner and this helped tremendously. No more popping and bangingThrottle response seems to be getting better the more I drive it.From a stand still to wide open I still have about a 1 1/2sec bog,Hesitation....Thinking I just have to keep running the water out of her.

  13. #13
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    You will be fighting water for a full tank or two. Just make sure to put the red heet in every tank for a while to help clean it out.
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    I rarely bring snowmachines inside. That way I never have water in my fuel. Ice, maybe, but there's a pickup screen in the tank to block that.

    Don't forget to make sure there's no water (or ice) in your airbox, your pipe, or your muffler. Also check all your vent lines. You could park a wet sled indoors for weeks and still find water if you don't do the work to get it out. Did you drain your crankcase? Frozen water doesn't cause as much trouble as liquid water. Ice melts as the sled warms. If it runs good cold and gets worse as the engine warms that may be another clue.

  15. #15

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    I would take it inside (as often as possible) and keep to warm and dry for as long as possible every chance I got. The old theory of leaving them outside has proven to be wrong for me. Problems solved when frozen up, only to surface when you ride and warm it up, is not an option.
    I would blow out every nook and cranny with an air nozzle. I would change all the lubes a few times. I would spray heet or alchyohol in areas that I thought might need it. I would take apart every wiring connection, blow them out and coat them with Dielectric Grease and put them back together, one at a time, so you don't leave anything undone. I would remove the recoil start and do the very best I could in blowing out the stator. I would pull all the cables off and soak them in a pan of diesel fuel overnight, hang them to drip dry, lube them with silicone spray and reinstall them. I would remove the airbox and blow it out big time. I would drain the carb bowls and leave the drains off overnight. I would unscrew the choke cables from the carbs and entire throttle mechanisms and blow them out real good.I would remove the exhaust pipe, exchanger, boxes, resinator and shake them real good and blow them out real good. I would swap out the OEM spark plugs and put in some DENSO Irridium Fine Wire Sparkplugs (these are the best, but use a cross-reference chart for your selection). I would examine the ECU for any obvious cracks and blow everything out that is around it. If none of this fixed it, I would take it to the best dealership mechanic you know of and have them diagnose the electronics. You would not have wasted your time on doing all the other stuff, as it needed done anyway.
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