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Thread: Are moose dangerous?

  1. #1
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Default Are moose dangerous?

    On a recent flight I picked up an Alaska Magazine. I was surprized to find an article saying that Moose being dangerous is just a myth. (It was refering to attacks not car collisions) The article said that dogs were the reason most human moose encounter occur.
    Though I have never had a bad encounter with a moose even while dog mushing, I viewed them as potentially dangerous and treated them with caution.

    So I was wondering what others thought and if any one wanted to share some of their experiences with moose.

  2. #2
    Mark
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    I had a close call with a cow on the trail to Beluga from Pt. McKenzie, in a section tight with brush. I had a fold-a-sled behind my snowmobile and couldn't back up, and the brush was too tight on both sides to ram through. My idiot partner in front of me pushed her down the trail a ways, then zoomed around her within yards. That stopped her (with him in front of her and me behind). He went on, and she stopped to kick my butt.

    I got off the machine as she walked up to it with hackles up and ears down. Just as she looked like she was going to stomp my snowmobile I fired a warning shot above her head from 15' away. She didn't even acknowledge the shot, but it got my idiot partner (who had stopped, turned around, and watched from a distance) to come back. That got her going back down the trail.

    The moral of that story is to slowly push them if they won't get off the trail until you have the opportunity to leave the trail (in a swamp or open area) to get around them. Don't pin them between you.

  3. #3
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    I've never had the opportunity to interact with moose, but I do remember the pics of the unfortunate person getting stomped by the cow at UAA.

    Sad & the potential to be dangerous.

  4. #4
    Member wldboar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_dog60 View Post
    So I was wondering what others thought and if any one wanted to share some of their experiences with moose.
    I had an experience with a moose just last night. He was in a roasting pan surrounded by onions, carrots, and potatoes.

    But seriously, I have never had a bad moose encounter. Reminds me of the guy at the university who got trampled. Others were thowing rocks and stuff at the moose and the guy walked out and wham. I think if you aggitate anything, it will finally reach its breaking point. Think mostly they just do their own thing. Don't bother it and it won't bother you. But you do need to be aware that they are there.

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    Default Yes

    Moose can be very agressive. They are not the smartest animal wich makes a bad combo.
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

  6. #6

    Default Of course they can be...

    particularly when the snow is deep and crusted and you find yourself sharing a hard pack trail with them like Marks example.

    SIDEBAR: fyi- there is yet another movement by the APHA to require non-resident moose hunters be guided. The justification....moose are dangerous game to hunt and non-residents need the protection of a "professional hunter".


  7. #7
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by AVALANCHE View Post
    .......there is yet another movement by the APHA to require non-resident moose hunters be guided. The justification....moose are dangerous game to hunt and non-residents need the protection of a "professional hunter".
    It worked with their victory in guide requirements for brown bear, Dall sheep, and mountain goat.

    It's BS, of course, but if it worked before..................

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    It worked with their victory in guide requirements for brown bear, Dall sheep, and mountain goat.

    It's BS, of course, but if it worked before..................
    I think it's silly for them to risk what they have to try and push this through...but maybe they think they have the right administration to make it happen. Guess we will find out.


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    Member zeda34's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    It worked with their victory in guide requirements for brown bear, Dall sheep, and mountain goat.

    It's BS, of course, but if it worked before..................
    Well it would generate more money for the guides and maybe take some of the hunting pressure off of the moose at the same time.

  10. #10
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeda34 View Post
    Originally Posted by Mark
    It worked with their victory in guide requirements for brown bear, Dall sheep, and mountain goat.

    It's BS, of course, but if it worked before..................
    Well it would generate more money for the guides and maybe take some of the hunting pressure off of the moose at the same time.
    And therein lie the true intents: money for them, and most residents support it because it will limit the number of non-residents who will be able to afford moose hunting (thus limiting the competition for the resource).

    It's just more of the same, exclusionary politics that is apparently growing in Alaskan outdoors politics.

  11. #11
    Member Wombat's Avatar
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    I was chased for a short distance while running on Eielson a few years ago. I didn't see a calf and it was mid summer. As I was running I heard loud thumping behind me. I looked over my shoulder to see a cow keeping pace with me. I sprinted to a group of larger trees and got behind one. She ran up to the tree and slowed down to a stop. She would try to walk arround the tree and i would move and get behind another tree. After a few minutes of this she left me and retreated back the way she came. I assume she had a calf in the brush but, I will never know.

  12. #12
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Default A moose charge

    A bull moose, shot through the lungs twice, charged me full speed with malicious intent. He was all antlers and looked like a black freight train. He barely missed when I let him have it at about 20 feet. Didn't knock him down right away (hit him in the chest and hit part of his heart) but stunned him enough so when I ran to the side he missed me. Needless to say he had a good reason to be aggressive, but it made an impression on me nonetheless!

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    This year I shot a fairly large bull moose about 200 yards right in the boiler room and seen him go down, I then put my rifle on my shoulder and walked up the hill toward where he went down. Well to my surprise when I got there he was standing up and when I spotted him ...he spotted me and put his head down and begun to charge me..so I quickly unslung my rifle and fired another round to the boiler room...well he went down again and when I walk toward him ... he was still lunging toward me as he was highly PO'd... so I had to put 1 more round in his head to take him out of gear.
    This was the first time I ever had a moose come after me once the gun fired. BTW either of the first two rounds would have killed him if I would have let him just die on his own...however after he went down I never saw him get back up..so word to the wise.. just because you see them go down doesn't mean they'll stay down....proceed with caution and have a round chambered ready to ROCK N ROLL.
    "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

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    Mostly, the moose in my neighborhood are mellow with people, and mostly avoid dogs. But, two summers ago, we had what I think was a just-shucked little bull that was very aggressive. This moose would chase the dogs before they would go for him. Once, it ran 100 yds to chase my neighbor around his house. One day, it was in my yard as my daughter and I stood on the (elevated) deck. It came up to the deck, hissed and foamed at us, and proceeded to stomp around and destroy the flower garden. We were all ready to put a DLP slug in it, but it moved on.

    Quote Originally Posted by motorboatn View Post
    Moose can be very agressive. They are not the smartest animal wich makes a bad combo.
    Jim Creek - Home of the burning car hook cast!

  15. #15
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default depends on the moose...

    we have had plenty of "negative interaction" with moose over the years. from having them in my team, (missed one point blank with a .357 at about 18"... reckon she was a bit deaf, though...), unprovoked in the neighbors yard (my wife whacked that one in the nose with the muzzle of her 30-06), or being treed by ornery bulls or cows who prefer OUR trail to no trail... go figger.
    of course, we have also had little bulls bed down in the dog yard, and until the stinkin' frisbee golf course went in next door we had a cow that always raised a calf or two here because our dogs kept away the bears and wolves.
    but all in all, YES, moose are dangerous.
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Just for fun draw a winter tag and shoot a hot cow dang near out from under a bull. Now try to get to her to start skinning.... yeah moose are down right docile...

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    any animal that size with even a small tude can be fun. Here in MN i got chased by a cow with a calf. I hopped back in the truck and got away. i am glad i was only 15yrds from the truck. when i looked back they were both gone but mom did not like me there!

  18. #18
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Will be interesting to read that AK mag article (maybe <grin>).

    Certainly as we all know, moose can be extremely dangerous in winter when we have deep snows and are using the same trails. I've had some very hairy encounters in those situations with the dogteam, amazing no dogs were killed.

    All in all, my experience is that I've found moose to be much more dangerous than bears as far as run-ins. Most of my bad run-ins had to do with loose dogs, but I've also had plenty during hunting season with bulls in rut. All the ones with loose dogs involved cows with calf or calves. I've had bulls in rut come right up toward me, head down, grunting. Of course that always happens after you already have a moose down and are packing or back in camp. Kind of scary as they weren't easily persuaded to back off. Had one bull would not leave me alone after I shot a bigger bull and was butchering; maybe they had been fighting, not sure, but he kept coming right up to me and the downed carcass with his antlers down and hackles raised and two rounds right over his head did nada. Hated to do it but I finally fired a round from ten feet into the palm of one antler which really cocked his head sideways for a sec, and he left, albeit slowly and reluctantly.

  19. #19
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    until the stinkin' frisbee golf course went in next door we had a cow that always raised a calf or two here because our dogs kept away the bears and wolves.
    but all in all, YES, moose are dangerous.
    <giggle>

    I forgot about the trustafarians next door.......Sounds like things are going well and good, eh?


    Do ya ever yell "PULL!!!!" when you see a disc headed yer way???


    Q: What is more easily agitated?

    A Mama Moose with a Calf?

    Or

    HomerDave relaxing in the tranquility of his kingdom, only to be interrupted by *Whiiiiiiiiiiiiish THUMP!!!!* "Dewwwwd you shanked it bro'!"



    <Grin>


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  20. #20

    Default My encounters with moose....

    First encounter was at Eielson AFB, mid summer night out taking pictures, after being briefed STAY AWAY FROM MAMA AND CALF.... was walking along a willowed lake shore, when out steps calf followed directly by mamma less than 20 yds from me. I slowley backed out... no incident.

    Next encounter... several years later, in my yard (in MT), in early March, while clearing packed and melting snow/ice from my driveway. Mamma and calf wander in the immediate area and I retreated to the house. I got a little impatient and went back outside collected a couple of rocks and tried to scare them off... yeah right... they were not impressed. So I decided to casually slip around them to work on my driveway. Mamma didn't like that, laid her ears down and started a brisk pace in my direction. I immediately hopped a fence and quickly returned to the safety of my house and did not go back out until they left. Side note: I had a few other occasions with moose in the yard but opted not to go out and introduce myself.

    Next encounter... Walking a trail with my son and 3 yellow labs. I spot a bull moose about a 100 yds off in a beaver pond/marsh. The dogs also spot it and pack up and start barking and dancing all around it. My son thinks this is cool and starts heading that direction, with me loudly warning him to stay away as the dogs may come his way with bull moose in tow. We got though that one.

    Most recent encounter... Bear hunting this spring, walking out in late evening on a local trail. I surprised a young cow, who in turn surprised me at a distance of about 10 yds. The moose starts moving and my rifle comes up. The moose turns and runs down and across the trail out of sight... whew...

    Friend of mine skiing on a local trail was met by an unfriendly cow that chased him a ways back down the trail. This guy is an avid outdoorsman, hunter, mountaneer, etc, etc, He was shaken by the experience.

    Gal friend of mine, first husband was killed by a bull moose who put a tine through his skull.

    Second hand story, of gall walking on local trail who was stomped by a moose.

    Another son of mine, returning on a trail from back packing with one of my yellow labs. The dog encountered a moose and started barking. It was almost dark, the dog retreated back to my son with moose in tow, my son, thinking it was a bear drew my Ruger 41 and nearly fired as the moose happened stop about 6 ft away from him.

    Yes, moose are very potentially dangerous, most encounters end without incident, but some don't. Oh well... know the facts and be safe as you can.

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