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Thread: Need aTraining Tip!

  1. #1
    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    Default Need aTraining Tip!

    i have a golden retriever training problem. when he is off the leash and there are no other dogs in the near area he minds wonderful. he doesn't run off, i call him over every once and a while and pet him and praise him and then let him go again and he stays right with us. when he sees another dog off he goes and won't come back until you go and grab him. i work with him on the leash around other dogs and he does great, even on a long rope. he is 4 and should be well out of the puppy stage. i know there is something else i should be able to do, apparently i'm not smarter than my dog. the frustration factor is starting to peg and i am hoping someone has a helpfull tip. the next step for me is trying a training collar, which i have been doing a little homework on but have never used one on any of my former dogs. any help would be great! thanks

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    Be careful with the collar. Incorporate it into all of the dogs training from the basics to the advanced stuff to make sure your dog understands why he is getting shocked. Only use it to enforce commands your dog knows it should obey. Shocking them for an unknown reason can do a lot of damage to your dog. I have used one on my dog and it works great. From the begining I slowly introduced her to it. I started off with a check cord and training crop, then when she understood the sting of the crop I started alternating stimulation from the collar and the sting of the crop. It worked out good. Im no expert though, so take my opinion for what it is.

  3. #3

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    First I'd have to ask how is his obedience. Obedience means listening to you under all circumstances. The problem with dogs is the level of correction we use when the dog is calm and not excited ...doesn't work when the dog is. When on leash you may have to reinforce obedience by using the leash. When off leash you just have your voice and your presence for correction. If the dog doesn't allow you to be the leader then you don't have ultimate control.
    You also have to think faster than your dog. If you see a situation that you know will excite your dog. Correct your dog right then and get them under control before the excitement level goes up. It is easier to keep them at level one (a calm state) than it is to bring them back under control once they have reached a higher level of excitement. We have all seen or have experienced having to chase your dog down or have had to push aside your barking excited dog trying to get someone in through the front door. These behaviors can be corrected by us humans learning how to be better handlers and understanding how our dogs think.

    Kobuk, I would go back to some obedience lessons. Your main problem is control on recall. (Coming when called by name) Your timing and level of correction may not be enough to make your dog aware that you are the one in charge.
    I would start with your long rope and have some of your buddies with dogs of there own on leash. Set up a remote sit and practice recalling your dog. Then have your buddies dogs running around on long ropes as well playing with them. Then set up your remote sit again then do a recall.
    E collar is not a first choice fix to this problem. Coming when called has to be taught first by other means before the e collar can be used as a tool to reinforce it.
    If you are local I'd be glad to help you out.

  4. #4
    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    wetland retrievers, i will try working a little more with your advice. i have noticed this dog trying to act more dominate than the others i have had. he works pretty good with me, but my kids do a lot of the daily walking and i see him trying to be boss. i also work with the kids showing what i want and the dog needs and will still catch them letting the dog do what he wants sometimes. i guess i have the same problem with the dog as the kids!! i know it can be fixed, i just don't know how to do it. when i work on the long rope having him sit and use the come comand, he does great. i have even tried to say come and quickly tug the rope and he still beats me. i will try with other dogs around. i know he knows the comands and what he is supose to do, but off the leash he will sometimes look over at me and then bolt. talk about piss a guy off. then when you get him to finally come back and you want to throttle him, you can't do squat ecause he came back. any other tips will definietly be apreciated.
    arky, thanks for the reply. if i can't get him to come around i will consider trying the training collar.

  5. #5

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    Ahhh. Ok. So he thinks he's in charge. Basically he's hanging out with you until something more fun comes along.

    I would recommend you start with some in house obedience. Once this is solid it then can carry over to outside obedience as well.

    Find a dog bed or even a house rug large enough for your dog to lay on.
    Put him on it and teach him to remain there. He is to remain there indefinitely. That is our goal. At first you are going to have some battles, but don't get frustrated. As soon as his feet come off the rug or mat correct him and put him right back on it again. Use a leash to put your dog back in position again. Start with short lessons and short stay durations and gradually build to where the durations are longer. This should take about a week with maybe 3 to 4 lessons per day. Later you can even "claim" your dining room area as your area and make your dog wait on the rug or mat as you and your family eat dinner.
    Your dog should only come off when he is called by name off of it.
    Every member of your family must understand the reasons for training and all must stay consistent at maintaining the new rules. Each family member should also participate in the training. It does no good if your dog only listens to you but will run over your other family members.

    I also recommend that you teach your dog to heel at your side and not to walk in front of you. This is on or off leash. This establishes a different level of obedience. This teaches that you are not to leave my side unless I allow it. You can also establish a recall standard during this training process. We can also e collar condition your dog during this period as well to commands already taught.

    From what you have mentioned....it sounds like your dog knows obedience but over time has learned how to get away with certain things. Plus he has learned your limitations of control, which is distance. You just need to re-establish your position through obedience drills like I have mentioned. This is just a handful to get you started.

  6. #6
    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    i'll give your tips a shot. thanks for the help. i think i understand what you are showing with the drills. great idea. when i walk him i want him to stay behind me but the best so far is his shoulder is with my leg. i would like him behind for several reasons like a tight trail, so i am not bumping into him, etc. but there again, even with using his pinch collar which he responds great with, he won't stay behind. i realize that this is a dominance battle and i ran out of ideas. he does walk next to me really good with very little corrections and makes for pleasant walks, but i would prefer he stay behind me. thanks again for all of your help!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    i have a question... when you say all family members must participate... how do we get the dog to respect the kids? they are nether large enough or stern enough for a large dog to acknowledge. so i tend to NOT do my training while they are home.. not to mention the pup gets confused with "their helping voices"
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  8. #8

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    What I mean ....is a dog should understand its place. It is subordinate even to the youngest in your family. For those children old enough to handle the family dog should be taught how to properly. Of course younger children are to be supervised with the family dog. Adults are to be present to monitor the childs and the dogs behavior. Correcting the dog or the child as needed to ensure proper taught behavior.

    Your family dog operates by a social heirarchy. That is how wolves in the wild structure the pack. There are alpha leaders and then each sequential subordinate. The more alpha members eat first and get first dibs on everything. You have to think this way when you train a dog to coexist in your family. From eating.... down to who gets to sit on the sofa.

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