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Thread: Accidents on the trapline?

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    Default Accidents on the trapline?

    Ok! Now I know ya'll have done something for granted that you do all the time and some type of accident may have happend.Take for instance this morning I was checking my snares and took for granted that I knew where one was and was sort of trotting thru the area and bam! next thing I know Im face down in the snow
    Let me tell you it happened so fast that I did not expect that it was my snare that caught me.And If I would have thought about it I'd have taken a picture.So who else has some mishaps on the traplines that we may learn something if not we'll get a good laugh.I still cant get over that I snared myself what a dumb arse! hahahahaha! jeez! Daniel

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Hey at least you caught something , I'm sure one of those native ladies would buy you at the fur auction
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

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    Getting my hand caught in a trap is one of my biggest fears. It happened to me last year. Good thing I had Big gloves on, I was able to squeeze the spring just enough to loosen the trap with my left hand to slide my right one out. Didn't break anything, but it sure gave me a good scare!
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  4. #4

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    If you don't count sinking snow machine in overflow, rolling one down a hill, or getting whacked with a 330, never had one.
    Chuck

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    Try both thumbs in a 120, for the first time that season I had someone with me on the line, so I did'nt have to walk out and drive home with redneck handcuffs.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Riding my snowmachine 3 miles back home with a 110 stuck on my hand comes to mind.....
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Well now, I don't feel so silly! At least Im not the only one who's done it.

    I have been through the ice a few times as a kid, but I don't remember it ever being as scary as the thoughts I Had when my hand was stuck, maybe it was the fact I was always with my dad back then...... I now carry the husbands multi tool.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Same thing happened to me on the trail today. I was checking snares and I jump a bunny. The hunt was on....Being distracted I ran right over the top of one of my snares luckily it didn't trip me. It was all worth it... Guess whats for dinner?

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    Default eating snow

    bunny boots are kinda clunky to walk in and I trip and go face down to eat some snow occasionally I use those scissor type trap setters and i've practiced using them one handed just in case I catch myself in a 120 or #3 or #4 but I think I'd be SOL if I got both thumbs caught!!

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    Default 330 Conabears

    IM SURE THERE HAS BEEN A TRAPPER OR TWO WHO ACCIDENTLY GOT THEM SELFS WRAPPED - UP IN A CONABEAR AND FOUND HIMSELF IN A DIRER SITUATION BUT ESCAPED ALL ODDS AND LIVED TO TELL THE STORY . THOSE ARE THE TYPES OF STORIES WE HOPE TO NEVER ENCOUNTER BUT TO KNOW IT COULD HAPPEN TO ANYONE OF US .

    GOOD THREAD DANIAL . . . . . . .

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    Default only one

    fell though the ice at -30. I had walked the same path 4 or 5 times in 2 weeks. I was by myself but not to far from the truck so not to big a deal. As for the conibear on your hand thing. Never done it, but if it's only one hand, there is a way to get out of it with 3 foot or so piece of rope. Go's for the 330 as well.

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    I was driving a snowmachine way too fast in flat light conditions across a large lake. I didn't even see the drift, the next think I knew I was flying through the air, no longer attached to the snow machine. I recalled that my left arm felt funny as I was doing my best imitation of a wounded duck. When I came to my senses I found my left arm dislocated at the shoulder. I started to make the 18 mile ride back to the truck but the pain was too great after bouncing along for about five miles. I tied my arm off to the snowmachine and slowly stood up and pulled the ball out and put it back into the joint. Ahhh sweet relief! Loading the machine back into the truck was a chore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akmac View Post
    I was driving a snowmachine way too fast in flat light conditions across a large lake. I didn't even see the drift, the next think I knew I was flying through the air, no longer attached to the snow machine. I recalled that my left arm felt funny as I was doing my best imitation of a wounded duck. When I came to my senses I found my left arm dislocated at the shoulder. I started to make the 18 mile ride back to the truck but the pain was too great after bouncing along for about five miles. I tied my arm off to the snowmachine and slowly stood up and pulled the ball out and put it back into the joint. Ahhh sweet relief! Loading the machine back into the truck was a chore.

    Ok, you win!! Ouch!
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  14. #14

    Default A dear friend of mine

    was out on his sno-go checking the line on a bitterly cold day. He wasn't paying attention and got whacked pretty good by a branch...enough to knock him out and throw him in the snow. When he woke up his face was frozen. He made it back to his cabin, but he lost most of the skin on his face. That frostbite can happen fast!

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    Default Where to begin <grin>

    Like Rob, I got caught in a 330 once. Dang scary. Lucky I had the trapping axe next to me. Most of my injuries have been mushing related while checking line. One year the caribou were around and it was early November and little snow and we ran into a band while negotiating a large boulder field at the bottom of a hill, just no way to slow the dogs...broke a couple ribs that time but still managed to not let go and lose the team.

    Had a run in with a wolverine caught under a marten set; sorta like Deb's tale of walking along the line and not really paying attention, the dogs were cruising along and I wasn't really paying attention when all of a sudden they just bolted fwd and before I could stop them all eight of them were tangling with a wolverine. Just a few minor cuts on hands for me, not sure if it was dog bites or wolverine bites <grin>. After I finally got all the dogs pulled off and tied off, the wolverine didn't have a scratch on him. He is the guy I made my wolverine hat out of.

    Scratched my cornea a couple times on the trail hitting branches, lost the team twice and had to walk a very long ways at -40 sans snowshoes on soft trail, once it was far enough I laid down under a big spruce for a spell cuz I was just exhausted and realized I was about to fall asleep and never wake up.

    Took a bad fall on rock-hard frozen overflow once when the team decided to make a right angle turn and the rig caught an edge and flipped, landed on side of head and it knocked me out for maybe ten seconds. Major headache that day and I was laid out on couch for a while after I got home.

    Can't say how many times I've had spills on the trail that were quite spectacular...once early in the season I was running a loop line that goes up one drainage and into higher country then back down another drainage. There is a real steep section that requires me to "chain up," which involves wrapping a chain around the bottom of the toboggan to slow it down. Well of course the dogs were still screaming down the hill and since there wasn't much snow the chain caught on a root from one of the trees I'd cut to make the trail when the snow was deeper. Stopped me and dogs dead and I ended up about halfway down the team after really banging both knees badly on the handlebars going over them. Couple dogs were hurt too from pressure of stopping like that.

    Fell through the ice once early in the season, was on a large pond we go across on one of the flats. As the toboggan was sinking (with me still on it trying to surf it out) and I realized it was gonna drag all the dogs down with it I jumped off to save the dogs and the toboggan ran up on top of the ice again. I yelled whoa and the team stopped about thirty yards away. I was really surprised not to touch bottom, didn't realize those ponds were that deep. Thing was every time I tried to get out the ice would break. I wouldn't say I started to panic but I was definitely getting concerned! I finally pulled my sheath knife out and kicked off hard and jammed it in the ice as far as I could reach and used that to lever myself up on the ice in a laid out position and then just rolled over and over to shore and walked a bit farther and called the team over. Lucky it wasn't too far from home cuz by the time we got back I literally could not bend my legs or arms, was wearing carharrt insulated coveralls and they just froze solid.

    My wife has seen me arrive home in various conditions of disrepair <grin>. All part of being out on the line all these years with the dogs.

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    Default Close calls

    Bushrat , you have had your share of close calls on the trapping-line . Just goes to show how quick things can happen when you least expect them too . Wrapped in a 330 would be like wearing a unwanted tourniquet . I read where alot of us get into trouble around water and ice . Isn't it mentioned that Alaska has the highest rate of drowning . We can try harder to prevent these occurrences by reading and learning from others .

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    Its fortunate that I see everyone who has had an unfortunate incident (some more than others..bushrat) actually kept there wits about them and came out alright, thank goodness.

    Another one comes to mind that put me out for three months was about 4-5 years ago the wife and I where out early in the winter checking trails for a snare line,and thank god I was at the truck by this time,but as we where coming up to the truck I rolled my 4 wheeler over pretty violently and bad enough that when I hit the groundI knocked all the wind out of my lungs and could not for the life of me catch my breath and couldnt lift my left arm.

    My initial thought was d@mn felt like I was kicked by a horse and the entire time I could only suck in short breaths without almost feeling like passing out, and that 40 miles back to town was painful as all get out.

    Well come to find out in the Emergency room that I had a Pulminary Contusion...or in laymans terms,I bruised the upper lobe of my lung.Wish Id have taken pictures of bruise that went from my neck down the otter part of my arm and al the way around it to my armpit and down my ribs.And fells take my word treat your wife good,cause all those times you give her hell and poke fun at ya......oh! they are bidding their time.And every cough,sneeze,hic-cup and time she would make me laugh brought tears for almost 2 months.

    P.S. I want to thank everyone who shared thier mishaps with us for these may help those who have not had problems out there and hopefully brand some thoughts in mind as to what to do in dire times.

  18. #18

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    I've heard you can remove your hand from a conibear with the rope setting method. Thoughts?

    I suppose a winch from an atv would work quite well too.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZK9EqpnQ_E

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    Default 220 stuck

    I was fisher-cat trapping in NH resetting the trap on the running poll,wile i was reaching up to camo the trap with a spruce bow i looked at my footing and then I was wearing the 220 on my forearm and it was wired to the tree my partner was on the other side of the beaver pond.
    lucky for me only one of spring was unhooked it took me 10 mins. to get it off my arm. I had to push the spring up against the tree wile I was on my tippy-toes ya good times. then I found the trap setter spring hook very nice tool .

  20. #20

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    While checking beaver snares under ice one january on snowmachines I had a beaver that had froze to the bottom of the ice so I had to cut a large hole to get him out. It was about -30 and the closest cabin was about 8 miles away. Well the wife was with me and after I had the beaver out I turned to her and told her to stay away from the hole as it was -30 and if she fell in she may become bait!! Well as I turn around from my speach down I went to my arm pits. And guys let me tell you at -30 it dont take long for things to freeze. I instructed her to get wood and fast so we built a fire and I moved the sled as close as i could to act as a reflector well I made it out with a melted cowling but I had all my toes and a new respect for my wife.

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