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Thread: Water in oar shafts

  1. #1

    Default Water in oar shafts

    I can't believe how much water is in my oar shafts(composite).
    How do you remedy this phenomenon?
    Thanks, abel6wt

  2. #2
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Wow I have composite oars and never have any water in them. Id interested in seeing what the responses are in here
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  3. #3
    Member Trouthead's Avatar
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    You're using carlisle blades I bet, I switched to Sawyer Dynalites and havent had any issues. Probably you could use something to seal the hollow part of the blade that inserts into the shaft. Or maybe just ductape the joint including the locking button.
    Last edited by Trouthead; 11-24-2008 at 18:33. Reason: add stuff

  4. #4

    Default

    More specifically, there is water "trapped" in the shafts.
    I take the blades off and try to pour the water out and nothing happens.
    There seems to be multiple chambers in the shaft and the water is trapped in one of them. I paddled a lot this summer, but never left my oars in the water and my boat lives in a garage all summer. Weird. I bet one of the forum ninjas has heard of this problem. Fellas?

  5. #5
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Start drilling 3/16" drain holes. I doubt you will be able to seal them up tight so you may be better off providing some drainage.
    AKmud
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  6. #6

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    Thanks AKMud.
    First, any suggestions on where to start drilling?
    Second, are you worried at all about the structural integrity of the shaft with the holes drilled in them?
    Thanks again, abel6wt

  7. #7
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I'm no expert on oar shafts, but if it is chambered like you think, you would need two holes in each chamber (top and bottom) before the water will actually drain. The oars I have are 2-2 1/2" diameter so I wouldn't think a couple 3/16" holes would sacrifice much strength.

    I'd call Alaska Raft and Kayak or another specialty shop and ask about a solution. There may be an easier way without boring holes.
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Unusual situation

    This is not a normal situation, but this might help:

    If you have break-down oar shafts, you might try taking them apart and looking inside the sections that have cork inserts inside them. If you have one-piece shafts, you will not be able to do this. But if you remove the blades (they should come off with a push button at the end), you should be able to see the cork inside. The cork is there supposedly for floatation, but as was mentioned elsewhere, the aluminum shafts don't float, even with cork inside. What has probably happened is that the cork has allowed water to flow past itself into the area behind the cork. Then the cork swelled up and blocked the shaft, trapping the water behind. You have two options to eliminate water trapped behind the cork:

    • Drill a hole in the cork. Use a long flexible drill snake, or even perhaps a long steel rod that is flattened out at the end. It doesn't take much. Leave the shaft standing so the water can drain out through the hole. DO NOT drill a hole in the oar shaft! You will weaken it. After you drain the water, let it dry a few days and consider putting some Aqua-Seal in there to plug the hole. Or just leave it open so you can drain it next time.
    • Remove the cork. In some cases you may be able to use a piece of rebar or a dowel to shove the cork out the end of the shaft from behind. It's up to you whether you want to re-insert the cork afterwards, but if you do, you will probably have the same issue again.

    If you have left your oars in the water for a long time, or even perhaps out in the rain for extended periods, it's possible that this is where the water came from. As I said, this is an unusual situation, that usually indicates that the cork itself is flawed and allowing water to pass through when it is dry.

    Hope it helps!

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