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Thread: A cord of wood =

  1. #1
    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Default A cord of wood =

    Just curious on what average size tree length x dia, makes a cord of wood ?
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    Default here yah go

    A 6' pickup bed loaded is about a cord.

    6' x 4' x 4' OR
    12' x 2' x 4'

    That help

    and cost should not be over $ 225. Depending on type, condition split / unsplit.
    Now dilivery will add some $$

    Hope that helps
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Default

    Just a guess 18" by 30' lose stack

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    wrong all the way around for legal purposes:

    Dealers should be offering wood in cords or fraction of cords. Any other terms (pick-up load, face cord, rick, rack, pile, etc.) are prohibited for the sale and advertising of wood. A cord is 128 cubic feet of wood stacked tightly. This is typically stacked 4’ high by 4’ wide by 8’ long (4X4X8). (FYI reference: typical full size pick-up, bed level, will hold cord.)

    http://www.jwiwood.com/faq/cord.html


    we get our wood in 8' ft lengths to ensure wood=cost

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    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ret25yo View Post
    wrong all the way around for legal purposes:

    Dealers should be offering wood in cords or fraction of cords. Any other terms (pick-up load, face cord, rick, rack, pile, etc.) are prohibited for the sale and advertising of wood. A cord is 128 cubic feet of wood stacked tightly. This is typically stacked 4’ high by 4’ wide by 8’ long (4X4X8). (FYI reference: typical full size pick-up, bed level, will hold cord.)

    http://www.jwiwood.com/faq/cord.html


    we get our wood in 8' ft lengths to ensure wood=cost
    Yup.

    A lot of folks try to pass off a short bed pick-up load (thrown in, not stacked) as a cord. A real cord is 4' x 4' x 8' stacked tightly...try to get a full cord in any pickup without added side boards...ain't gonna happen. My dad, being a frugal one, ordered a cord of wood at $100. They showed up with the usual pick up load. when it was unloaded and stacked, he took measurements, did some math and gave 'em a check for $57.

    This don't answer your originaal question about the size of a tree though. That...I dunno.

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    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKRoadkill View Post
    Yup.

    This don't answer your originaal question about the size of a tree though. That...I dunno.

    shouldnt matter ... wood is wood

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    128 cu ft. is a cord. It would take a 12" log, with no taper roughly 163' long to equal a cord.. My 20' dump bed...stacked 3' high in logs makes 3.75 cords...but I'm not selling...I'm hoarding wood right now

    A 12" birch tree will usually taper about 3" in a 20 length. So that tree equals about a 10th of a cord.

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    With sideboards, I can haul 1.25 cords on my Super Duty. I wouldn't recommend trying it w/o air bags, though.

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    . It would take a 12" log, with no taper roughly 163'
    That's what I wanted thanks Doug ,I'm going to lay down some trees and I only need 2 more cords ,I just did not want to cut to many trees off Borough land
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    Default Brief discussion of wood measurement.

    A cord is 4 foot X 4 foot X 8 foot. It is a volume measurement for firewood that includes dead air space. A cut to length and split cord has more air and thus less wood. However, it is worth more because all the work has been done.

    Whole trees are usually measured in board feet (1 inch X 12 inches X 12 inches = 1 board foot) which includes no airspace, just solid wood. This is how a lumber mill buys wood and how a timber sale value is calculated.

    The size of your trees and how you cut them up before measuring them will dictate how many you need to cut to get a cord of firewood.

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    Just watched a story on the local news 2 days ago. They had a 1/2t P/U loaded to the top of the bed. They had a state certifyer there to check it as they stacked it in a rack. It came to approx. 1/3 of a cord. I see guys around town with a P/U loaded and a sign saying a CORD. of wood. It is also against the law to sell a P/U load as a cord.

    Gun Runner

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    There are pick-up loads, and then there are pick-up loads. I'd never buy a "cord" of wood w/o measuring it myself. Of course, I don't buy my wood, anyway, so it doesn't much matter to me what somebody with no integrity tries to sell a pick-up load as. I do see it all the time, though. The Safeway parking lot in North Pole seems to be a popular place for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by walk-in View Post
    There are pick-up loads, and then there are pick-up loads. I'd never buy a "cord" of wood w/o measuring it myself. Of course, I don't buy my wood, anyway, so it doesn't much matter to me what somebody with no integrity tries to sell a pick-up load as. I do see it all the time, though. The Safeway parking lot in North Pole seems to be a popular place for it.
    Really? For cord of wood scammers?
    Maybe I am just not all that observant, but I don't see anyone selling cords of wood at Safeway.
    Odd. I'll watch next time I do a small grocery shop over there.
    Serious. I am not questioning you, Walk-In. I'd like to affirm you of that. I personally just have never seen people doing that at Safeway. Odd... really odd.
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    I see them there periodically throughout the winter. They're not there all the time, but when they are, they're usually parked close to the road so people driving by can see them. I haven't seen any there for a few weeks now, but I'm sure they'll be back.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Also for an FYI you can measure the BTU's in a cord of wood. It is based on the wood's density. Spruce has 14.5-15.9 million btu's per cord. Birch has 20.3-26.8 million btu's per cord. While cotton wood only has 13.5 million btu's per cord. Know what kind of wood you are getting to make sure you get the most BTU's for your money.
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    Remember that recoverable BTU's per cord is the number you are really looking for. Since most wood is not all the way dry you can figure only 60% to 80% of the BTU's contained in a cord are recoverable. Figure around 14 million BTU's per cord for birch that is somewhat seasoned. That works out to right at 1 cord = 100 gallons of heating fuel.
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    Default Stove wood cord

    Any body ever heard reference to a stove wood cord? That's what we would call 4 foot high long pile cut to stove lengths, around 20 inches.

    jeff

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    Around here folks call that a "face" cord. Since most "face" cords in these parts are 16" deep, it would be 1/3 of a cord.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Remember that recoverable BTU's per cord is the number you are really looking for. Since most wood is not all the way dry you can figure only 60% to 80% of the BTU's contained in a cord are recoverable. Figure around 14 million BTU's per cord for birch that is somewhat seasoned. That works out to right at 1 cord = 100 gallons of heating fuel.
    This is a good point that a lot of people don't think about. I see lots of wood advertised in the paper as being "seasoned." I always wonder what exactly they mean by seasoned. Generally speaking, birch needs to be split and allowed to dry for 2 years to be really seasoned. Spruce dries much faster and doesn't necessarily need to be split (for moderately sized pieces).
    I solved this problem by building a wood shed that will hold about 3 1/2-4 years worth of wood. I divided it in 1/2 and filled it completely with split wood. I burn out of 1 half until its empty, then start in on the other and refill the 1/2 I just used.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ret25yo View Post
    wrong all the way around for legal purposes:

    Dealers should be offering wood in cords or fraction of cords. Any other terms (pick-up load, face cord, rick, rack, pile, etc.) are prohibited for the sale and advertising of wood. A cord is 128 cubic feet of wood stacked tightly. This is typically stacked 4 high by 4 wide by 8 long (4X4X8). (FYI reference: typical full size pick-up, bed level, will hold cord.)

    http://www.jwiwood.com/faq/cord.html


    we get our wood in 8' ft lengths to ensure wood=cost

    I wish I knew rick was prohibited. Down in Arkansas EVERYBODY labels there wood rick and you will NEVER see cord on ANYTHING. I dissagree with you there. A rick it 8 feet long 4 feet high and around 16 inches wide. So about 3 ricks would make a cord. I'm not saying ricks are better than cords, but most people down here don't even know what a cord is.

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