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Thread: crampons

  1. #1

    Default crampons

    This may have been addressed before, but I wondered if there are crampons or "stabilizers" that will fit Alaska Hunter boots by Meindle. The sole on these boots is so hard that when on wet/snowy/frozen ground they are dangerous. They dig like crazy on dry ground, but not on wet; especially grass covered rock such as that found in the Chugach area.

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6.5-284 View Post
    This may have been addressed before, but I wondered if there are crampons or "stabilizers" that will fit Alaska Hunter boots by Meindle. The sole on these boots is so hard that when on wet/snowy/frozen ground they are dangerous. They dig like crazy on dry ground, but not on wet; especially grass covered rock such as that found in the Chugach area.
    I think for grass covered rocks your in tough luck. You could try having them caulked, but caulk boots aren't the greatest on rock either.
    If I understand what you are asking correctly..
    Could send them to hofmann and have them put on their "predator extreme" sole.

    But most step in crampons fit the Alaska hunters from what I've seen if you just want to go the crampon route.

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    Different types of crampons out there. By looking at your boots online, i think you can clip in the rear and would need a strap up front. These are some links for suggestions of what i am talking about, plenty of other brands out there, not just black diamond:

    a clip in back, with strap front:

    http://www.backcountry.com/store/BLD...-Crampons.html

    strap crampons:

    http://www.backcountry.com/store/BLD...p-Crampon.html

    strap crampons, aluminum

    http://www.backcountry.com/store/BLD...-with-ABS.html

    The first two are steel and are sharp, the last one is aluminum and not "sharp" at the points. I own all three and like them. I started with the clips and then added straps for other stiff soled boots i have that i can't clip in to. the aluminum ones i got on www.steepandcheap.com as an extra pair for family and friends as they were really cheap. keep your eyes on that website as they will offer crampons from time to time.

    for what you describe, the aluminum ones might work for you to get a "bite" into the ground. the others are really for ice and wind-swept crust.

    if you have non-winter boots, you can try getting your boots studded. skinny raven downtown does that. i think you can remove them as well, not sure though. i also have hiked with yaktraks with the velcro strap that goes over the foot, and they have helped a lot. if you go that route, get some extra velcro or strap and bring another piece across the front of your ankle to help keep them on better.

    good luck. hope this helped

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    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    My Kahtoola mid-sole crampons fit those boots fine.

    And they go off pretty quickly when I need to go over the rocks without making an awful noise. They're easy to slip & clip back on when you get back to the slick stuff.

  5. #5
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    My Kahtoola mid-sole crampons fit those boots fine.

    And they go off pretty quickly when I need to go over the rocks without making an awful noise. They're easy to slip & clip back on when you get back to the slick stuff.

  6. #6

    Default kahtoola micro spikes

    I plan on using a crampon/cleat on a late-season goat hunt in the Chugach. I couldn't find the mid-sole ones but I did stumble on to the micro spikes by Kahtoola. These look as if they might work because they claim that they will work on scree, rock and snow. The only thing I don't like about them is the chain on the bottom. I think that they would be very noisy---almost like a knight wearing chain mail. Any advice?
    Last edited by 6.5-284; 11-21-2008 at 19:20. Reason: spelling error

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    Kahtoola Micro Spikes are a good item, but yes they will be loud.

    Jason

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6.5-284 View Post
    I plan on using a crampon/cleat on a late-season goat hunt in the Chugach. I couldn't find the mid-sole ones but I did stumble on to the micro spikes by Kahtoola. These look as if they might work because they claim that they will work on scree, rock and snow. The only thing I don't like about them is the chain on the bottom. I think that they would be very noisy---almost like a knight wearing chain mail. Any advice?
    After doing research with military guys who use these, I instead went with the Austri Alpin 6 point crampon. They are like instep crampons, but have to heel spikes and lateral support. I do tons of hiking, went for goats and deer this year, I wear these everywhere and love them. The lateral support has NEVER allowed the crampon to *roll* on me Try something like http://www.gearbuyer.com/products/au..._crampons.html
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  9. #9

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    Thanks to all who have responded. I am just wondering if the crampons (especially the ones for the toe) are dangerous in grass? Do they catch on stuff and trip you up? Would the 6 point ones also do this? I don't think that I will be dealing with much ice. Most of the troublesome spots will be either frozen ground with a coating of snow, or slick, steep grassy slopes. Can you wear these things on this type of terrain. Plus, if you do much side-hilling will they stay on your boot? Roger, you say that the Alpins have never rolled on you so apparently they do stay where they are supposed to. Again I have never worn crampons so know absolutely nothing about them. I am afraid that something like the micro-spikes won't stay on without messing around with extra straps.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6.5-284 View Post
    Thanks to all who have responded. I am just wondering if the crampons (especially the ones for the toe) are dangerous in grass? Do they catch on stuff and trip you up? Would the 6 point ones also do this? I don't think that I will be dealing with much ice. Most of the troublesome spots will be either frozen ground with a coating of snow, or slick, steep grassy slopes. Can you wear these things on this type of terrain. Plus, if you do much side-hilling will they stay on your boot? Roger, you say that the Alpins have never rolled on you so apparently they do stay where they are supposed to. Again I have never worn crampons so know absolutely nothing about them. I am afraid that something like the micro-spikes won't stay on without messing around with extra straps.

    I bought my Kahtoolas specifically for use on grass (goat hunting). Get up there in that steep goat terrain with wet slippery grass slopes and the terrain is essentially two football fields standing up right leaning on each other and those crampons will be the only thing that allows you to sidehill. If the terrain isn't that steep then you dont need em, but would hate to get up on top of that steep stuff and not be able to safely sidehill without risking sliding or falling if you lose your footing, not to mention descending. And the Kahtoolas work well with the Meindl Alaska Hunters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6.5-284 View Post
    Roger, you say that the Alpins have never rolled on you so apparently they do stay where they are supposed to. Again I have never worn crampons so know absolutely nothing about them.
    The 6 point crampons have a nylon strap that runs along the back of *any* shoe or boot. The metal plate with the spikes can be adjusted for width. The blue plastic lateral supports are attached to the strap that covers the heel, then criss cross over the top of the shoe and lock your foot to the crampon. The 4 point crampon goes beneath you instep and only attach over your foot...I find that these tend to *roll* so that after a short period of time you have to stop and re-set them...a real PITA IMHO.

    The biggest problem I have heard with anyone is that if your feet are always close when you walk then you can tear/rip your pant legs as you walk. I have never done this.

    I wear these crampons pretty much year round. I climb the Butte 3-5 times a week year round. Lazy Mountan at least once a month (the crampons are no problem oin the rocks on top). Mat Peak and Pioneer Peak in the summer. Hatcher Pass at times. I like to hunt deer and goats. I also use a pair of trekking poles on most hikes (except the Butte). The biggest advantage for me on the 6 point system is that they have the 2 extra spikes in the back that prevent slipping and falling on my butt. Parts of Lazy Mtn are step and slippery if there is rain on the clay or ice in the winter. I have solid footing with this system. Coastal wet grass, with or without ice...piece of cake. I have not found any situation where they don't work.

    Finally...I have not tried the Katahoola spikes personally. I really wanted a pair until I talked with some military friends who use them a lot. They seem to have greater limit for there use and they seem to come off the foot easier. I went with the Alpin because they were 1/2 the price. I have not been disappointed.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  12. #12

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    Just want to clarify that the ones I have are not spikes, they are the KTS crampons. Heres a link, I dont want anyone to get the wrong stuff due to different designs being discussed.

    http://www.kahtoola.com/crampons.html

  13. #13
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Do you use the aluminum or the longer steel KTS crampon?

  14. #14

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    Aluminum, though I have been told the steel ones last longer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaCub View Post
    Aluminum, though I have been told the steel ones last longer.
    Thanks Cub.

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    Smile Stubai Ultralight Universal crampons

    http://store.everestgear.com/421100.html


    These are light weight to carry and very durable. Steel are better for serious mountaineering but heat treated aluminum is much lighter and is probably better suited for what most hunters are going to use them for. Most hunters probably carry them in or on their pack more than actually wear them. If you get in to much rock or wear them for an extended time on mixed ice and rock, aluminum will ding and dull much quicker than steel.

  17. #17

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    I think that I have decided to go with an 8 point crampon. Now to figure out which brands are most reliable and have the best warranty. I have narrowed it down to Stubai, Austri Alpin or Kahtoola. Anyone have any input on this? Thanks!

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