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Thread: How much $ can I save reloading 375H&H

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    Default How much $ can I save reloading 375H&H

    Hi,I am new to this site & I will be receiving my first CZ 550 Safari 375 H&H mag. My question is would it be worth the cost to reload this round? About how much per rd. would it come out to reload VS buying the Ammo? It should be noted that I have not reloaded Bullets before-but I am willing to invest in a re loader.By the way-what type is a good one to buy? Thanks-Tim.

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    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    I think it would depend on how much you are going to shoot that thing! Do you have other guns that you could also reload for, The more than, the more you save just adding the other die,s In the old days we could custom reload certain bullets that at the time weren,t offered in Fac. off the shelf ammo and get the rifle tuned in just right, The at first cost of the stuff,Die,s press, drop tube, scale, powder, primers ect.....The savings won,t be realized at first but couple Yr,s you will start to gain ground. Not to mention the fact that critters you take with your own ammo, Well what do they say, that is priceless. Start slow, get a good teacher someone that has done it before. Watch garage sales, adds so forth for the best prices. If have the time it can be great fun & rewarding.

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    There are a lot of good reloading outfits. I pieced my components together. I have a lot of Lee tools and favor RCBS dies.

    For me though I reload for all my guns except for auto pistols.

    What I like about reloading is that for the price of a couple of boxes of 375H-H ammo I have bought dies and tried loads with 300 Sierras 235 and 300 grain Barnes TSX bullets and 235 speers with three different kinds of powder. That is not too hard to do comparing a box of ammo at $65 or more.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    As a reloading addict, I can say that you will not save any money. Sure, the rounds will cost a lot less, but they are so cheap, you will shoot a lot more. LOL... Been there, done that.
    Seriously, there are a couple good starter kits. One, made by Lee and another by RCBS. The RCBS costs more, but if you are serious, it is made to last a lifetime. The Lee, I don't know, no first-hand knowledge.
    Start with at least two reloading manuals, and follow them religiously. You may not load the world's best ammo at first, but you will not blow yourself up either.

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    Greetings and welcome....

    The question of cost savings is a function of what calibers you plan to load, and how much you plan to shoot. When first starting out, there will be considerable investment capital buying reloading equipment and cartridge components. The first box of ammo that you produce will be extremely expensive per round. The second box will be slightly less expensive...the third slightly less, etc. Therefore, the more you shoot, the greater your savings potential over comparable factory ammunition over time. Also, good reloading equipment will usually last longer than we do. Search the archives on the forum for recommendations of different reloading equipment companies for ideas.

    If you are planning to only load for the .375H&H, and your primary interest is to save money, then I'd say that you should just keep buying factory ammo. You aren't going to shoot high volume with that great cartridge, so it will take a long time to start getting a return on your investment capital...probably little if any cost savings for some time.

    Many of us load all of our own pistol and centerfire rifle ammunition and have done so for some time...so the cost savings are clearly there and realized. However, I have to admit that I primarily reload because I enjoy it. It's a relaxing hobby for me, and I really get a charge out of taking game with my own handloads.

    Good luck

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    That is a good point about not spending less.

    Personally I do not spend less but I do shoot more.

    Also I really like the "one book, one caliber" loading manuals.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Thanks Guys that was good food for thought! I am learning from seasoned Gun Men! I will just buy my ammo for now.Do you recommend a certain type or brand of ammo for the CZ 550 375 H&H? Thanks-Tim.

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    Default Welcome to your new obsession

    Quote Originally Posted by t.strick2000@yahoo.com View Post
    Hi,I am new to this site & I will be receiving my first CZ 550 Safari 375 H&H mag. My question is would it be worth the cost to reload this round? About how much per rd. would it come out to reload VS buying the Ammo? It should be noted that I have not reloaded Bullets before-but I am willing to invest in a re loader.By the way-what type is a good one to buy? Thanks-Tim.
    Tim,

    Welcome to the forum, and be warned, welcome to your new obsession.

    So much is a matter of personal taste. All advice carries this caveat, "your mileage may vary".

    When I bought my first gun (.357 Magnum Dan Wesson revolver), I bought, at the same time, a reloading setup because I knew I could not afford to shoot if I did not reload my own ammo. It cost me about 1/4 of factory ammo.

    For your question about the cost of reloading the .375, do a little research on the pricing of your components and retail price of loaded ammunition and go to this handy calculator:

    http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp

    or plug some formulae into a spreadsheet and run the calculations yourself.

    here are my top ten advices:

    Advice #1 Study up before even looking at equipment. I found "The ABC's of Reloading" to be a very good reference. Short on data, yes, but I found it full of knowledge and understanding of the process. Check out offerings in your local library. Dated, perhaps, but you can taste-test their writing style. Read as many manuals as you can, for the discussion of the how-to steps. What one manual covers thinly, another will cover well. The reason you want more than one or two is that you want to read differing authors/editors writing styles and find ones that "speak" to you. After you have read borrowed or library copies then you can decide which ones you want to buy.

    There are instructional videos now that did not exist in the '70s when I started.

    Richard Lee's book "Modern Reloading" has a lot of food for thought, and does discuss the reasoning behind his opinions (unlike many manuals). Whether right or wrong, the issues merit thought, which that book initiates. It is not a simple book, though and you will find it provocative reading for many years.

    As far as load data in older manuals, the powder manufacturers and bullet manufacturers may have better information and their web sites are probably more up to date. But pay attention to what the ammunition was test-fired from. (regular firearm vs a sealed-breech pressure test barrel)

    Only after you know the steps can you look at the contents of a reloading kit or individual components and know what parts you will use or want.

    Advice #2 Cast iron lasts practically forever. Cast aluminum is lighter, cheaper and less durable.

    Almost every manufacturer of loading equipment makes good stuff; if they didn't, they would lose reputation fast and disappear from the marketplace. Better equipment costs more generally. Lee makes good equipment, but is generally considered the "economy" equipment maker, though some of their stuff is considered superior to more expensive makes. Just think about what you buy and do your research and remember what I said about personal taste.

    Almost every manufacturer makes a kit that contains everything you need to do reloading (except dies and the consumables). A decent way to get started without too much prior experience. Eventually most reloaders wind up replacing most of the components of the kit as their personal taste develops, but you will have gotten started, at least..

    Advice #3 Learn on a single stage press or a turret press. Do not learn on a progressive press. Too many things happening at the same time and hard to keep track of. Invitation to disaster.

    Advice #4 Tungsten Carbide dies for your straight-walled cartridge cases. They do not require lubrication which will save you time. Carbide expander button for your bottlenecked cases. Keeps lube out of the inside of the cases.

    Advice #5 Find a mentor. There is no substitute for someone watching you load a few cartridges and critiquing your technigue BEFORE you develop bad habits or make a dangerous mistake. (A mistake that might not have consequences right away, but maybe only after you have escaped trouble a hundred times until one day you get bit, for instance having case lube on your fingers when you handle primers 99 times, no problem because primers are coated with a sealant, but the hundredth primer may not be perfectly sealed and now winds up "dead")

    I started loading with the guy who sold me my press watching over my shoulder as I loaded my first 6 rounds to make sure I did not blow myself up, load a powderless cartridge or set off a primer in the press. There is nothing like a tutor, or better yet, a mentor. A longer mentoring period might have changed my reloading style, but I learned a lot in those first 6 rounds, as he explained each step. Then I educated myself after that.

    After you have been mentored, mentor someone else. Not necessarily in loading or the shooting sports, but in SOMETHING in which you are enthusiastic and qualified. Just give back to the community.

    Advice #6 Read previous threads on reloading, here are a couple I read.
    http://forums.accuratereloading.com/eve
    http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543
    http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/view...fbd5ae1f754eec
    The second one is a thread started by a new recruit to reloading whcih the moderators thought highly enough of to make it "sticky" so it stays on the top of the list of threads.

    Advice #7 When you buy the very best, it hurts only once, in the wallet. When you buy cheap (too cheap) it hurts every time you use the gear. The trick is to buy good enough (on the scale between high quality and low price) to keep you happy without overpaying.

    Advice #8 Wear eye protection, especially when seating primers

    Advice #9 Don't pinch your fingers in your press.

    Advice #10 Verify independently for yourself everything you learn.

    Believe only half of what you see and one quarter of what you hear. That goes double for everything you find on the internet (with the possible exception of the actual web sites of the bullet and powder manufacturers). This advice applies to my message as much as anything else.

    Good luck.

    Lost Sheep

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Actually, I think that reloading is cheaper, especially for the larger calibers. You can set yourself up, reloading wise, for under $300 buying Lee equipment (as I did). Your first 100 loads will be more expensive than store bought. In the little comparison list I made your reloads could be $2.96 per round while store bought could be $2.60 per round. Your second 100 loads drop to .78 per round while your store bought would remain the same. There are a lot of variables to this, but the most important being how much will you be shooting as the savings don't kick in untill the second 100 rounds.

    10 years ago I bought a .458 Win Mag and almost had a heart attack when I bought loaded ammo-$80 for 20! I was already reloading, so I didn't have the high equipment outlay.

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    Hi,

    I spent around $100 dollars to get my lee anniversary kit w/ dies from cabelas. Add in the scale and calipers was another $40. If you see this as a none issue then don't count it in your costs, just as start up.

    Brass was $34 for 50. Bullets (Hornady 270 SPBT) $ 19 for 50. Power IMR4064 $20 per pound and primers another $20 for 1000.

    Cost per round $1.25

    The major difference is using the advise for the folks on this board helped me bring my groups down to sub 1" at 100 yrds with a great load mentioned here.

    Ron

  11. #11

    Default Your life

    IF you shoot a 375 H&H you are in need of a heavy rifle. Reloading is a great addendum to hunting it allows you to load what you want when you want it without waiting for your local gun shop to get a box of ammo you ordered in. The savings in dollars will be negated by the increase amount you shoot. The greatest advantage is you can practice shooting your rifle from offhand positions at targets of unknown ranges slow and rapid fire. These are the kinds of practice that can save a hunt and possibly your life. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE
    While the 375 H&H isn't considered by many as a target rifle they are capable of some serious accuracy. Reloading can increase the rifles potential and yours as well. Reloading equipment that isn't used on a daily or even weekly basis doesn't have to be expensive or complicated for that matter. I know several hunters who use nothing more than a Lee Loader to reload for several calibers.
    Enjoy !
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    You asked what to use, Depends on what game you are shooting. W.W. 270 power points was the standard in Africa for yr,s Thin skin plains game,My gun liked the silver tips 300gr. Bearclaw,s Noslar,s Grandslam,s Interlock, Core-lokt, There are all good. Buy couple boxes at a time, Let the gun tell you what it likes, You will see good grouping, Remember it,s were you hit them that counts! more than what you shoot them with.

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    I'll bet that CZ is not picky about what it likes. Atleast mine wasnt. match the bullet to the game and your GTG. If its your only rifle and you are hunting here, a 260 partition or270 interlock/power-point/cor-lokt/power-shock load would be my pick for everything.

  14. #14
    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Default HH

    I've tinkered with a few loads and settled on this one:

    300gr Hornady RN - .40 each

    Any brand of brass - Varies from .50 cents each to over a dollar. I have reused my current set of cases 8x. Calculated out - my brass then costs about .10 per loaded round.

    CCI Mag Primers - Currently .03 to .04 cents each which is higher than I've ever seen them...

    66gr of Varget. - I can get just over 100 rounds from a pound, which last time I checked was $25. So figure .25 for powder.

    These are all round numbers... But that puts me at around .79 per round ($16/box) to shoot this particular recipe. Last time I saw factory ammo for 270gr Federal classic was $50/box. That saves $34.

    There are better powders, no doubt. There are bullets that work better for certain applications. This just happens to be where I settled.

    The load clocks 2400 fps from my 20" CZ, and 2500 when it was 25". It will shoot MOA from my rifle from a rest on a good day.

    If you shoot one box a year - its not worth it. If you shoot 10, you might pay for most of your gear.

    If you enjoy 'making your own' and the focused quiet time relaxes you - its absolutely worth it.

    If you are in Eagle river and want to run thru the process some time, drop me a PM.

    Nate

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