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Thread: Titanium Goat Tipi for winter camping?

  1. #1

    Default Titanium Goat Tipi for winter camping?

    I have been eyeing the Titanium Goat tipi for quite a while now. I really like the idea of a lightweight tent with a wooddstove for hunting trips. The floorless design also sounds great since you can walk in the tent with muddy or snowy boots on.

    My question is how would it work for winter camping/hunting in the interior when it's 20 below? With a good clyinder type stove would it heat up to say 50 above or is the material just too thin to keep any heat in? I know an Arctic Oven would be superior for winter camping but they are just too heavy and bulky for most of my applications.

    I would like enough room for 3 people, some gear, and the woodstove. Do I get the vertex 6.5 or 8?

    Any input from actual users of the tent will be appreciated, thanks.

  2. #2
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    Default Have you looked at the Kifaru?

    KIfaru I think it is spelled, it is Swahili for Rhino. They make a similar design in more sizes. If I new how to clip and post a link I would. My friends have had much luck with them in all conditions in their eco tourism business.

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    Default another thread in this forum

    If you go back to the end of this forum and work you way page by page toward the front, you'll find another thread on the TiGoat. I have looked at both the TiGoat and the Kifaru (online only), and I believe the TiGoat is less expensive. I am thinking that I would like to purchase the setup for myself someday.

    Joe

  4. #4
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Kifaru

    i have the 12 man Kifaru tipi (old style ripstop nylon - not the new silnylon). I use the Kifaru large stove in it. With good wood, which is very important, I can add 70 degrees F to ambient. As soon as you shut the stove down the temperature goes down with it. A larger more airtight stove would work better for keeping the tipi warm.

    The liners help greatly with keeping heat in and keeping gear dry.

    I love the floorless design - except that I keep going with people that want to put a tarp down on the whole floor - - -

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default

    i have used the 6.5 for weeks on end, just me but there would be room for two. the stove gets HOT, the quickest touch will burn a hole in, say, a sleeping bag faster then you imagine <grin>.
    easy to get to 50-55 degrees but once the stove goes out the heat leaves too.
    i am sure the liner would help, but in the 6.5 i think it would cut into your room.
    TiGoat will build you anything you want, they may still have a HUGE tipi they made for a friend of mine who passed away.
    ask them about the joe's "cro-magnon cave".
    great tents!
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Great Tents, Great People!

    Here's a LINK to a review I wrote on the Ti-Goat for spring camping, with pics.

    And here's a pic after we set it up one day when my daughter got cold out on the trail. On hardpack snow like this in spring it's a real fast setup, fifteen minutes and you're in there gettting warm.



  7. #7

    Default

    thanks guys. I need to decide what size to get, the 6.5 or 8?? I think the small size (when packed) and weight of this tipi style tent would be more suitable for various types of hunting trips. I guess I am still trying to convince myslef this is the way to go rather than a Arctic Oven!

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Default

    Hey Bushrat,
    Have you had that tiGoat in any high winds?? Im curious as to how well it holds up in a wind event. By all accounts they hold up pretty well in stiff weather... just thinking about southeast style rain and wind.

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default high winds... you bet!

    i had a custom v8.5 up on kodiak when we were hit , literally, by the tail end of a typhoon. though the tent held up well, it was LOUD!
    another consideration is that these tipis are very hard to get properly pitched in high wind. IF you get them up and tight in good weather they are fine in wind, but they have upwards of 15-20 stakes that all need to be taut.
    my 6.5 easily withstood everything the tundra of western alaska threw at me for weeks on end, but i was able to pitch or re-pitch it in good weather....
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default Winter use - TiGoat vs Arctic Oven or wall tent

    jpost,

    I've used my TiGoat in winter, down to -30 at night. And while you can get warm and all in it, there is just no comparison to an Arctic Oven. The real drawback with the TiGoat in winter is that there really isn't anyplace to hang and dry your gear. While the little stove is going, it's warm...but in real cold temps it has to be flaring all the time. You have to stoke it every fifteen minutes with very small wood. With a good bag, it's doable...let the stove go out and have kindling ready to start it in the morn.

    My kids and I came to the conclusion that where possible our wall tent was the way to go for winter use. Would like to get an arctic oven, can't really afford one <grin>. The great thing about the TiGoat is it and stove hardly weigh anything and are very compact. So I carry that setup in my toboggan all the time now when mushing or on the trapline. Just in case I run into a situation, fall in overflow or whatever, and need to dry off/warm up.

    icb12, what Dave said about winds is your answer. He has far more experience than I do using one in high winds <grin>. He can tell ya some stories!

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Default

    good info guys thanks. I like the no floor idea, I always have my bivy anyway, so it makes sense.. And while most of my trips would be without a stove, I also like the idea that I could use a stove. Plus V6.5 w/ carbon fiber pole is 3.5 pounds! Heck yes.

  12. #12
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default just me but

    bigger is better. I always feel it is better to have a little extra room vs. not enough room....the 8 shouldn't be much heavier than the 6.5 (I am not familiar with TiGoat....

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