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Thread: Starting Toyo Stove in Cold Weather?

  1. #1
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Default Starting Toyo Stove in Cold Weather?

    I spent the summer Outside on the Continental Divide Trail and now that deer season is over in Minnesota I'll be back home in Fairbanks on Thursday. I installed a Toyo stove (Laser 60AT) last winter and this is the first time I'll be starting it cold.

    The fuel tank is nearly empty, and what's left in there is a mixture of diesel and #1, so I'll be filling it back up when I get back, obviously with #1.

    So what's the best strategy to get it fired up with the least hassles? I read about "pour point depressants" which sounds like it might be a good idea with the mixture that's in the tank now. I was planning on preheating the cabin to a higher temperature with the electric heater, with an electric space heater heating the stove itself.

    My other stove was usually no problem to start, but I've heard the Toyos and Monitors can be a little trickier if it's really cold.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    I have had several Toyo and Monitor stoves over the years. I can't speak to the temperatures you are going to face, but definitely use #1 when you fill. These stoves are very sensitive to carbon build up in the combustion chamber and the heat exchanger. Depending on the hours on the unit, you might want to tear into it and change the burn matte in the chamber. Given clean #1 and a little tlc these stoves work great.

  3. #3
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    I have a Monitor in my garage. It has always started right up when I turn it on in the fall, but it is usually much warmer than now when I start mine. Besides filling up w/#1, you obviously should change your fuel filter. It may be perfectly fine, but filters are cheap. I change mine every fall. I assume that Toyos are similar to Monitors and have the same type of intake/exhaust fitting on the inside of the wall. Mine has a rubber cap covering the unused port on the fitting. Depending on how cold it is, you may find that when you start the stove up you get a lot of condensation in your combustion air intake. If it freezes before you heat it up enough from the exhaust, it can restrict the air flow enough to shut the stove down. To prevent this from happening, remove that rubber cap so that the stove is drawing combustion air from inside the house instead of outside. Once you've heated it up enough, this shouldn't be a problem again (if it is in the first place). When it is extremely cold here (50 below or more), I usually take that cap off because the exhaust heat sometimes won't be able to keep up with the frost formation on the intake tube. With the cap off, drawing air from inside, its no problem.

  4. #4

    Default No problem

    This reply might be a bit late, but I have started up my Toyo ( a laser 56) from a unheated state at < -20f several times without any problems. Others I know have done the same, and not had any problems. Anyway, I would not worry too much about it - just turn it on and all should be well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Buck Nelson View Post
    I spent the summer Outside on the Continental Divide Trail and now that deer season is over in Minnesota I'll be back home in Fairbanks on Thursday. I installed a Toyo stove (Laser 60AT) last winter and this is the first time I'll be starting it cold.

    The fuel tank is nearly empty, and what's left in there is a mixture of diesel and #1, so I'll be filling it back up when I get back, obviously with #1.

    So what's the best strategy to get it fired up with the least hassles? I read about "pour point depressants" which sounds like it might be a good idea with the mixture that's in the tank now. I was planning on preheating the cabin to a higher temperature with the electric heater, with an electric space heater heating the stove itself.

    My other stove was usually no problem to start, but I've heard the Toyos and Monitors can be a little trickier if it's really cold.

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Fairbanks
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    Default

    Thanks for the replies. I ended up preheating the place a bit with electric heat then trying the Toyo and it fired right up. Next time I'm not going to sweat it.

    Happy Holidays!

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