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Thread: Dri Duds / Frogg Toggs Review

  1. #1
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    Question Dri Duds / Frogg Toggs Review

    I am trying to find some information on the rain gear "Dri Duds". I was looking into Frogg Toggs but Sportsman's doesn't carry, they only have Dri Duds which is a lot cheaper. I wanted to see if anyone uses these on hunts or fishing. Thanks for any input. Looking to wear in PWS as it is really rainy out there.

  2. #2

    Default Frogg Toggs

    Wiggy's on the Old Seward has the Frogg Toggs, don't know much about them but they look like the would be pretty noisey walking through brush and alder thickets.

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    Moderator JDM's Avatar
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    Cool Frogg toggs at B&J Commercial last time I looked

    I think they still have these at B&J Commercial, never used them but see people in Southeast using them for fishing....lightweight for sure, but probably noisy in the brush for hunting...I like Helly Hansen Impertech 3/4 length guide coat and the bibs or hipboots for hunting and fishing, but most of my fishing is from the bank.
    LOL

  4. #4
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Cool Risking the wrath...

    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45
    Wiggy's on the Old Seward has the Frogg Toggs, don't know much about them but they look like the would be pretty noisey walking through brush and alder thickets.
    At the risk of incurring the wrath of the Wiggy's crowd, and prefacing my comments with two disclaimers, I'm going to toss out some considerations here. Take it for what it's worth. Here are the disclaimers:

    1. Though I have spent a LOT of time out in the rain (some say too much), I have never done so clad in Frogg Toggs.

    2. On the basis of #1, my information is all second-hand. So you decide how valuable it is, etc.

    Okay, here's what I'm hearing.

    Frogg Toggs seemed to go through a surge of popularity about two or three years ago, but the popularity lasted only a season or two. They're fragile and easily torn. Take a big step over a log or a hummock and rip the crotch out, that sort of thing. Based on user input, they seem like throw-aways to me.

    Serious rain demands serious raingear, and I still haven't found anything better for hunting up here than Helly Hansen Impertech or Peter Storm.

    None of the above information is intended as a slam on anyone, living or dead, active or booted, real or fictitious, sourdough or cheechako. So there.

    Okay, I have my helmet on now. Fire away!

    -Mike

  5. #5
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Default

    Hard to beat the Impertech's for long term waterproofness and durability! Last I checked, Sportsman's on Old Seward stocks 'em. I was also surprised to see they have Alaska's own "Bull Magnet." Cool they carry some local gear.

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    Default Frogg Toggs

    I agree with Michael S. I was very interested in them when they came out simply for their lightweight and packable characteristics for sheep hunting. That year I didn't sheep hunt but 2 buddies did, and they both shredded their sets. So I will add that although this is second hand they are definately throw aways. They are only a little tougher than Tyvek and we all know how easily Tyvek tears.

  7. #7
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default "Tyvek Toggs"

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaCub
    I agree with Michael S. I was very interested in them when they came out simply for their lightweight and packable characteristics for sheep hunting. That year I didn't sheep hunt but 2 buddies did, and they both shredded their sets. So I will add that although this is second hand they are definately throw aways. They are only a little tougher than Tyvek and we all know how easily Tyvek tears.
    I like it! Best analogy I've heard yet! "Tyvek-Toggs". From what I'm hearing, this stuff needs to be voted off the island.

    Well, that's probably a little too harsh. If you just need something quick and light for a weekend thing, it might be okay. But who knows when you'll tear them? Me? I'd rather have regular raingear.

    Lesson learned: Innovation is fantastic, and it keeps all the manufacturers on their toes. If Frogg Toggs takes this idea back to the drawing boards and comes up with a different, stronger material, perhaps we'll have something here. Product failure often becomes a stepping stone to something we can all use. Hat's off to Frogg Toggs, if they take that route!

    -Mike

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    Default You guys are sold on Impertech?

    I had two different Impertech waist length jackets and one set of bibs. The bibs tore on the first trip while walking through some waist high willows (not something that should have happened). Then the crotch seam gave out while I was riding my wheeler. The jackets would keep me dry for about 1 hr. then seepage (mainly at the seams) became a problem. I spoke with the Helly Hansen rep at the sportsman show that year (about 2 ago) and he told me to take the gear back and claimed my jackets were defective. Of course I have yet to do that and in the mean time I just break out my Grundens for the hard core rain. They aren't light or breathable or anything fancy but they are super tough and dry.
    AKmud
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  9. #9

    Default I am on my second pair...

    the first pair lasted several years but gave out from general use, a hole in the sleeve from getting too close to a lantern (this material burns easily), and over washing. I bought the second pair (camo) three years ago and haven't had to use them much because of the mostly dry weather. I did take them to Cordova for a duck hunt and was told by fellow hunters that the camo color was to "bright" and did not look natural. The other bad thing about them was the elastic at the end of the sleeves. It does not seal off well and you can get wet there. But most importantly, if you are going to be in continual wet weather, Frogg Toggs are not for you. They will saturate after a while and you will need to dry them out nightly.
    However, if you are a sheep hunter and weight is a consideration then give them a try. I was told that the solid colors repel water better. Wiggy's caters to a lot of sheep hunters and that's why they carry them. They do work, you just need to know their limitations.
    I just bought the new River's West rainpants with neoprene cuffs. Waiting for the All-terain jacket to go with the pants. The sleeves on the jacket have neoprene cuffs also. Will be using them this year. B&J and SW are carrying that line in Los Anchorage.
    SeaULater

  10. #10
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default Frogg Toggs

    What they are:
    Triple-laminated polypropylene.
    Inexpensive
    Waterproof
    Windproof
    Washable
    Very lightweight

    What they are not:
    Durable
    Bulletproof
    Flameproof

    Here's why I utilize Frogg Toggs:
    $65 a set. Over the last 5 years I have invested exactly $105 in raingear. How much have you invested? As long as you're okay with that...
    They are extremely lightweight and packable, and that is important to me whether I am hunting sheep or moose. About 17 oz. for a set (top and bottom). How much does your raingear weigh? Okay, as long as weight is not important to you...
    It takes about 18 hours of submersion or continuous exposure to water before they will soak through. Unless you own rubber, just stick your raingear in a bucket of water with a large rock weighing them down. The ONLY raingear that is a total barrier is rubber. ALL others will eventually become saturated.
    They are repair-able. I ripped my crotch - repaired it on the inside with duct tape. Problem solved. The seams are not sewn, they are "melded". I have not had any other seam problems except with the crotch, and that was only on the camo model, which has more ink in the material.
    They are no more noisy than any other raingear. In their new form, yes, they do seem brittle or 'paper-y'. Wash them once or twice and they become like a dishrag.

    I reiterate - I enjoy the extreme light weight and packability of Frogg Toggs. I do not move through the alders with a pack on my back fully clad in raingear, therefore I have never had them become saturated from within or torn as a result of use.

    I do not hike, climb through alders or pack meat across the tundra in full raingear, whether it's raining or not because soaked from within is the same as soaked from above. When you get where you're going and the wind is blowing, or it is raining and you will be glassing for a while, THAT's when I put on my Frogg Togg top, and maybe the bottom if it is really bad.

    That is what Frogg Toggs are to me, and I DO own them and recommend them to those seeking lightweight, packable and affordable raingear.

    Taylor
    Last edited by Marc Taylor; 05-07-2006 at 07:40.

  11. #11
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Differences in Style

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor
    Over the last 5 years I have invested exactly $105 in raingear. How much have you invested? As long as you're okay with that...
    They are extremely lightweight and packable, and that is important to me whether I am hunting sheep or moose. About 17 oz. for a set (top and bottom). How much does your raingear weigh? Unless you own rubber...
    They are repair-able. The seams are not sewn... They are no more noisy than any other raingear. In their new form, yes, they do seem brittle or 'paper-y'. Wash them once or twice and they become like a dishrag.

    I do not move through the alders with a pack on my back fully clad in raingear, therefore I have never had them become saturated from within or torn as a result of use.

    I do not hike, climb through alders or pack meat across the tundra in full raingear, whether it's raining or not because soaked from within is the same as soaked from above. When you get where you're going and the wind is blowing, or it is raining and you will be glassing for a while, THAT's when I put on my Frogg Togg top, and maybe the bottom if it is really bad.

    That is what Frogg Toggs are to me, and I DO own them and recommend them to those seeking lightweight, packable and affordable raingear.

    Taylor
    Marc,

    Excellent post. You point out a variety of issues that illustrate something I had forgotten. We all have different styles of how we hunt and what we do in the field. Frequently these differences are what drive our choices when it comes to gear. Here are some examples:

    1. Noise. Impertech is whisper-quiet because the smooth texture doesn't create that "zipping" sound you get with nylon or other materials. I hunt in my raingear if conditions demand it, so the noise issue is huge for me.

    2. Hiking / Packing. We have different styles here. If it's pouring rain, you can bet I'll be wearing my raingear if I'm hiking or packing meat. Yes, I will be wet inside my raingear (I try to mitigate that somewhat by opening the vents, unzipping the front a bit, etc. But I'd rather have warm, sweaty clothes on than cold, rain-soaked ones. Each of us has a different thermostat and I get cold pretty easily. If I didn't wear my raingear in those situations I could become hypothermic. As you know, I've packed a lot of meat over the years. Much of that was in the cold rain with my rain gear on. My brother-in-law is like you though. It can be -20 outside and he's got the window open! I think this issue is just a difference in style.

    3. Raingear in the alders. Again, another difference in style. I wear my raingear in the alders if it is raining, or even after a rainstorm. In fact, I'll even wear it after a heavy dew in the morning. You're knocking around in those alders and creating your own rainstorm even on a clear morning. So I'll put my rain jacket on and go for it, then take it off when I clear the brush. I wear my rain pants in high, wet grass too. Then I take them off on the spotting hill. Yes, I do get some sweat inside them, but I think I'm drier than I would be without the raingear. Again, a difference in style.

    From these things, you can see why I absolutely require, for my hunting style, something tough, quiet and 100% waterproof.

    Regarding the weight issue, I honestly don't know how much mine weighs. I will say though that it's by far the lightest rubber raingear I've ever seen. You have seen it too, I'm sure. It's very light, and I've packed it on many a sheep hunt.

    As to the cost, we're pretty close. You spent $105 on raingear in the last five years. I'd have to go back through my business taxes to verify, but I think I've spent about $120 over the last ten years. (Current prices are $122 for a jacket and pants; http://www.hellyhansengear.com/catal...ords=impertech ) My raingear has never failed. Ever. Not one rip. Not one leaky seam. Now, I don't ride an ATV much, and my understanding is that ATVs put a lot of strain in the crotch area. But I do hike around a lot through the brush and alders. Impertech has done me well.

    No harm done, no harm intended. Great discussion.

    -Mike

  12. #12
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default Differences in style

    You're right, Mike, great discussion. However, I usually don't stick my neck out on a product that I do not own or have not tried for myself.

    Needs and even perception of the usefullness of a product are relative to comfort levels, as you point out, as well as expectation based upon hype. I am comfortable being the only store in town handling Frogg Toggs because I educate each and every customer who asks about them on the points mentioned above. There's no hype surrounding Frogg Toggs. There are skeptical potential customers, happy customers, and a fraction will always be unhappy customers as are associated with every product.

    If no person ever buys Frogg Toggs again I will still use them as long as they are available. The people with whom I associate with, or just plain trust my recommendations based upon my experience, will either agree or disagree based upon their experience after my recommendation. No great harm done. $65 a set.

    Impact on my perception of my usefullness of the product -- zero.

    Truth be told, the only reason I responded to this post is because I didn't want to see the product trashed by someone with unrealistic expectation, based upon a faulty sales transaction, or by someone who "just heard" that the product was "this way" or "that way".

    Another truth:
    The persons whom I have sold Frogg Toggs to know what they are buying, know what to expect as far as capabilities and limitations, and are overwhelmingly (my transactions) happy with the product.

    Now, I have never owned a pair of Helly Hansen Impertec, and have never said a cross word toward them/it. But this post wasn't about Helly Hansen, now was it?

    Taylor

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    Cool Not for me!

    I have used Frogg Toggs in Alaska. Twice. I will never buy them again. Both times were when I was fishing. On the first trip, we spent our time trolling for silvers in 15' dingys with seats. When it rained, water would collect on the seat and consequently my bottom end got wet. Not a good thing.

    The second trip, I got some Helley Hansen bottoms. Not a problem with them. But I made the mistake of using the Frogg Togg tops again. This time, my arms got wet. Anywhere I would lean on my arms, water would leak through.

    On the up side, they are light. Maybe if you never sat down or brushed up against anything they might work. But I'll never buy them again.

    Paul

  14. #14
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default Frogg Toggs

    I own both toggs & a H.H. impertech top.
    As pointed out previously, for them to work for you it has to be the right application. I used a pair a few yrs ago right after they 1st came out on a Penn. Bear hunt. While the guide I worked for poked a little fun at me because of the color (off white / grey) they worked just fine until about day 9 or so. Also they were much lighter than the rain soaked cabelas fleece the clients had. And after a couple days the impertech felt just as damp & cold on the inside as on the outside, I packed it some days & left it camp on others.
    Because unlike Marc I donít have the patience to hike through alders with out rain gear on their demise came when we had positioned ourselves so that we had about ĺ of a mile of alders to go through. Lake on one side & steep rock cliff on the other & to back track at this point just didnít seem like an option. So after the stop, drop & roll fight with the alders I came out with a good tear in the thigh. However after the hunt I mailed the pants back (as it was a new product then & I didnít know its limitations & they sent me a new pair for free).
    I used them on a goat hunt in Kodiak last yr w/ no problems as well. They slip on easy enough & give protection against the winds, mist, & rain you often encounter up high.
    For the alpine or tundra they are worth their weight, as I canít imagine climbing in HH. They worked fine in these type applications when you arenít snagging them continually.
    Moose I donít know why yours leaked so much, the one thing I do agree with is the seat needs to be a little more reinforced as after a week of sitting & sliding on cold sharp rocks in the high country they tend to wear the fabric out in the seat.
    There is probably a time & and place for each.

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    Default frogg toggs

    i second what mark has stated above. extremely light and all the other good stuff.

  16. #16

    Default Off white/grey

    Has anyone used the off white/grey toggs as your whites for sheep hunting? I'm wondering if they are white enough to pass the scrutiny of those sharp eyes.

  17. #17
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor
    ...I usually don't stick my neck out on a product that I do not own or have not tried for myself...
    Marc,

    I'm running into a lot of people who take this position. I disagree. Clearly, you don't believe that you have to try EVERYTHING before you can venture an opinion on it! After all, if that were the case, we'd all be broke after buying the same gear that doesn't work. Instead, we come to places like this to talk about it with other folks, learn from them, and hopefully make an informed decision. We'd be foolish to do otherwise.

    That's my take anyway. There are LOTS of things I've stayed away from in terms of goods and services, strictly on the basis of educated opinions. Sometimes I'm wrong. But at least I was able to look at the pros and cons BEFORE I spent my money.

    This forum is an excellent place to do that.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Default ???????????

    Mike,

    You stated that, "I'm running into a lot of people that take this position. I disagree."

    Why doesn't that surprise me???????

    Joe
    Where there's a hobble, there's hope.

  19. #19
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Question Was there a question in there?

    Quote Originally Posted by ovis
    Mike,

    You stated that, "I'm running into a lot of people that take this position. I disagree."

    Why doesn't that surprise me???????

    Joe
    Joe,

    Point noted. Did you have something to say on raingear, or were you just faulting me for making conclusions based on research and experience?

    Just trying to figure it out.

    :-)

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
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    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  20. #20
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    Default Assuming

    Seems like there are alot of people these days that Assume alot of different things. Everybody is an expert on this forums or acts like they know everything. Every now and then it might be nice to have people comment on the products the actually use the products and not have every word of the testimony picked apart. Thank you Marc and especially AKMarmot for your fact filled reviews and not asserted concusions. I'm like the average joe who prefers this type of experienced based opinion to help me lean one way or the other. Will be frog-toggs for my sheep hunt.

    Terry

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