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Thread: Heads up on skinning

  1. #1
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    Default Heads up on skinning

    Folks, watch how you skin. for your taxidermist sake. Grant it thats why you pay them the big bucks, but some dont care and they mount/rug the way you cut. just about everything is fixable luckily.

    Before and after.
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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    looks like she's have more fun sowin' than mounting!! that bites... its easy to kill something guys, and just as easy to learn to skin properly, take the time.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default i feel you on that one

    more constistantly i see folks cutting the backside wrong...ending up with no hips and a big 'ol ghetto booty, and having to sew half the leg on the other side.....i don't think i've gotten an armpit like that one though...thats a good one...looks like you put it together good though
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Wow! I had a hard time telling what was what on that one! Nice sewing job though....make sure you save those pics for the owner of that rug!

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    Bears in particular seem to be problematic. Different for a rug than full-size ? I have yet to see a published diagram for the dotted lines.

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Really not sure what I'm looking at LOL
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Member Fuse's Avatar
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    Default Diagram

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP in BC View Post
    Bears in particular seem to be problematic. Different for a rug than full-size ? I have yet to see a published diagram for the dotted lines.
    Fish and Game has a decent tutorial on how to skin a bear:

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...rhunt.skinning

    Fuse

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    Thanks Fuse
    Will check to see how that works out,

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BillP in BC View Post
    Bears in particular seem to be problematic. Different for a rug than full-size ? I have yet to see a published diagram for the dotted lines.
    Shouldn't be a problem. Really helps the make the cuts before the animal stiffens.

    3.) Opening Cuts
    a. Bears
    i. Back legs
    1. Method “a”
    a. Heel to anus
    i. Affect; creates a pyramid appearance from just in back of the front shoulders to the end of the rug.
    2. Method “b”
    a. On inside edge of rear pad, 3-4 inches from heel to base of testicles or vaginal opening
    i. Affect; defines back legs and lines from armpit to groin area to be closer to parallel

    ii. Belly cut
    1. Straight line from “back legs cut” to “V” of lower jaw
    iii. Front legs
    1. From center edge of pad down middle of forearm to elbow – from elbow down middle of upper arm to point where chest (sternum) intersects with neck.
    a. Affect; creates a smooth line where the neck and shoulders met. The further down the chest this line crosses the greater the “flap” will be where the neck and shoulders meet and the greater the “hollowed” area will be just in back of the shoulders.

    Joe (Ak)

  10. #10
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Wink Bear Skinning...

    I believe the most effective way for hunters to learn proper bear skinning cuts to go and visit with your preferred taxidermist. Spend a few days with your taxidermist in very early spring and have him show you the proper cut location as the first "local" spring bears come in. Get your hands dirty and you will be a skinning pro by the second bear. It will only take two or three bears to get proficient with the foot knuckles, and three or four to completely learn spliting noses, and lips, and turning ears.

    The second best methed is to learn nothing and just screw-up the first and/or second bear you shoot and then learn as your taxidermists has a fit.

    But in defense of poor skinning jobs.....the big ones always seem to get bent-up in the bushes. When you shoot a big brown at sundown and he gets into the bushes you will probably (murphys law) find him the next morning piled up in a creek bottom and wrapped around three alder bushes. He will be too stiff to straighten out, and the creek gulley will be so steep you and three other strong guys can not get the bear out of the water. That has always been my best excuse for unusual skinning cuts.

    When I guided in the lower 48 we just tossed the bears in a pick-up and drove the entire critter to the taxidermist. Clearly that is not usually possible up here.

    Bear skinning/caping is just another of the skill-set requirement that each of us needs to learn if we are going to call ourselves hunters or guides....and keep that taxidermist from having a fit.

    Dennis
    AKTAGS

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    I'm sure some taxidermist can be real *****holes about some things. We are used to it. I was just trying to bring up that a good trophy starts with us (hunters) in the field, whether it is skinning, flesshing (or lack there of) and salting.

    So far everybody I have dealt with when they pick up there critters always ask me how they did and I will tell them the truth. So far everybody seemed to be appreciative. I'm just the hired help thats why I like it when the ole lady is around, she is much better at explaining things.

    It all reflects whats done in the field.

  12. #12

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    Looks like an honest slip of the knife to me - it happens to all of us.

  13. #13
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    Sorry gremlin, this wasnt a "slip of the knife". the armpit was on top of the shoulder.

    Its all fixable (unless your talking hair slippage), but, like I said it all starts in the field. A taxidermist can do some miracles but I do know of a few taxidermist who wouldnt eve try and fix this "slip".

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    Default More ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP in BC View Post
    Thanks Fuse
    Will check to see how that works out,
    BillP,
    I would talk to your taxidermist or Tracy on here as well (he has some good tutorials). I talked to mine and he called me as soon as he got a bear in with the skull and paws still in so I could try and see first hand how to skin them out. He also showed and talked me through the whole process. Talking to friends helped as well. Reading about it is ok, but it's much easier for me if I've seen it first hand. Let me know if you need any more help.

    Fuse

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    Question More $$$$?

    Would most taxidermists charge extra for a fix like that, and if so, how much more are we talking? Just curious...

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    castandblast, I hope taxidermist wont charge more to fix something. Sometimes crap happens. If a bad cut is made, and he/she gives you crap, find a new taxidermist.

    you pay good money for a good trophy, some things are out of our hands but sewing is part of the job. my wife is in the process of a bear with one eye. the hunter wanted it close to original, not an easy task but doable. Its a first for us but I think it will turn out OK. He wants it like it was when he shot it. no big deal , but she is a perfectionist. she has to purposely screw up an eye. its hard to screw something up on purpose.

    goes with the territory, if it was always easy, everybody would be a taxidermist.

  17. #17

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    I know, I was just trying my hand at this so called sarcasm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blink View Post
    Sorry gremlin, this wasnt a "slip of the knife". the armpit was on top of the shoulder.

    Its all fixable (unless your talking hair slippage), but, like I said it all starts in the field. A taxidermist can do some miracles but I do know of a few taxidermist who wouldnt eve try and fix this "slip".

  18. #18
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    Sorry man, didnt pay attention to the smilies. sometimes the internet does suck.

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    Smile Excess cost

    Quote Originally Posted by Cast&Blast View Post
    Would most taxidermists charge extra for a fix like that, and if so, how much more are we talking? Just curious...
    I am sure most would for an extensive repair. I was charged $160 extra on a goat shoulder mount after repairs above and beyond the norm were needed on his face. This was not due to my caping job but a terrible fall down a waterfall. The extra work (and money) was well worth it. You can not hardly tell on the finished product.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Shouldn't be a problem. Really helps the make the cuts before the animal stiffens.

    3.) Opening Cuts
    a. Bears
    i. Back legs
    1. Method “a”
    a. Heel to anus
    i. Affect; creates a pyramid appearance from just in back of the front shoulders to the end of the rug.
    2. Method “b”
    a. On inside edge of rear pad, 3-4 inches from heel to base of testicles or vaginal opening
    i. Affect; defines back legs and lines from armpit to groin area to be closer to parallel

    ii. Belly cut
    1. Straight line from “back legs cut” to “V” of lower jaw
    iii. Front legs
    1. From center edge of pad down middle of forearm to elbow – from elbow down middle of upper arm to point where chest (sternum) intersects with neck.
    a. Affect; creates a smooth line where the neck and shoulders met. The further down the chest this line crosses the greater the “flap” will be where the neck and shoulders meet and the greater the “hollowed” area will be just in back of the shoulders.

    Joe (Ak)
    Thanks Joe.
    That helps get the correct hour-glass shape without the Taxid having to cut-n-stitch.

    Fuse, I've got the other cuts down pat, but looking for a comparison of cuts for the different rug shape outcomes.
    Each Taxid has his vision of what he likes.

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