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Thread: pre-season maintenance/RMK 700

  1. #1
    Member jockomontana's Avatar
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    Default pre-season maintenance/RMK 700

    hello all!

    just broke out my 01' RMK 700 from the depths of summer slumber...
    ... took the plugs out, cleaned em up, and the beast fired right to life!

    looking to get into a friend's shop here sometime in the near future just to poke around the machine and check it out some... wondering if anyone out there has some good advice or cautions to look out for.

    I bought this sled last year and put about 800mi on it... 2000mi total. It was running strong last April when I put it to rest... I'm still fairly new to snowmachine mechanics but willing to learn. I'd rather do some preventative maintenace this early than lose out on some good days riding when the snow flies!

    hope this winter is bountiful to us all!
    cheers!

  2. #2
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Tighten all skid bolts, grease all the zerks as well. Might be time to change out your clutch springs with new ones. Have fun. I've been working on my two 600RMK's as well, installing aftermarked products and such, changing out tracks. Trimmed one down to 1.5" or so and renotched the lugs as well. Still waiting on several more items like an SLP can I ordered almost a month ago! New clutch springs, heavier suspension springs as well.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  3. #3
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    I'd open the chaincase and inspect it. Put the cover back on and refill with new lube. Grease everything. Take the belt off and clean the sheaves with a Scotchbrite pad. Remove the driven clutch and grease the bearings. and speedo drive. Make sure the drive clutch rollers spin. Don't lube them, it just collects dust and grit. Inspect the carb rubbers for cracks. Adjust track tension. Check all tie rod ends and make certain none of them are bent.

  4. #4
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    I would loosen up the track spin every wheel and listen for a grinding sound. If you find one you may be able to re greasy it.

    I would also check the suspension for cracks.

    Oil the clutch, replace the belt and keep it as a back up along with a new spare belt.

    There are shafts that hold the suspension up; their bolts go throw the sides check the Alum. for cracks.

    Check sky alignment.

    Clean, oil and adjust the secondary clutch.

    Check gear box for oil.

    If you have the book that came with it do the 1000 miles check up.

  5. #5
    Member Jktimm's Avatar
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    Smile My two cents worth...

    I like what Mr. Pid has to say. Most important thing you can do is pull drive chain case, adjust chain, and replace gear lube. After that, I like to grease suspension, and then add an ounce or two of HEET or some other gas line antifreeze / carb cleaner. Your old gas is hard on the seals (alcohol) and the gas itself degrades over the summer. Also condensation adds water to your gas. Cheap to clean the carbs every year. Finally, I like to hit the ends of all the cables and the tips of all the bolts with WD40. If you ever need to pull wear rods or adjust steering, this keeps the nuts from sticking. Nothing worse than sticky nuts!

  6. #6

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    If you have not checked the carbs, I would pull them and clean if needed, check what size main jets are in there, and what position the E clip is on the jet needles. Change them if necessary to the correct temperature and alt. you will be running at. I would keep track of my settings by righting it top of each carb with a sharpie (390/#3, 370/#3). If you add heat make sure, you use the right kind or you could have a melt down.
    Polaris recommends that you inspect your water pump belt every 1500 miles. More than likely it has the original belt; I would would replace it for peace of mind, I've seen a few come apart.
    With the key off pull the recoil/starter rope out, check for wear, and replace if questionable.
    This in addition to the good advice above and you should be ready to go.

  7. #7
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    Along with all the already mentioned stuff I change out the inline fuel and oil filters and clean out the air box of old oily debris

  8. #8
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Don't forget the exhaust valves. They gunk up and rob HP.

    If your sled has the VES system remove the 4 bolts holding the covers (2 short, 2 long) c a r e f u l l y, unless you plan on replacing the gaskets (a good idea anyway). Remove the bellows, gently wipe clean and hold up to the light looking for pin holes or tears around the edges or around the center flange. If the bellows are damaged replace them. Remove the valves and clean with brake fluid and a scotchbrite pad. If you have original, stock valves look for wear. The original VES valves were cadmium plated aluminum. Once the cadmium wears off they should be replaced. The new ones are stainless steel and need stiffer springs so don't get cheap when the sticker shock hits you.

    Clean your VES valves every 500 miles or so.

  9. #9
    Member jockomontana's Avatar
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    Default wow.

    thanks for all the good advice everyone... lots to think about here.. looks like I have a new hobby to keep me busy for the next few days.

    looking forward to some new snow.

    cheers!

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