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Thread: Need opinion

  1. #1
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    Default Need opinion

    So today I was greasing up the machine in preperation for riding tomorrow and noticed something. At the rear of my track is of coarse the 2 main outside wheels that the track rides on and then there is a 3rd wheel in the middle of the track (well its a little offset to one side). Well that wheels bearing in totally gone. the wheel still rides in the tracks groove but the bearing is gone and just kinda floats there wobbling around and around the rear axle. I think its been like that for awhile because its pretty rusted over and it just looks old. Anyway, I have no idea why I didn't notice it before, but I still wanna ride tommorow, is it ok to ride still with the center wheel all muffed up?. I believe I rode it like this the last few trips last year without even noticing it, can i ride it tommorow without causing any major damage?. everything else looks in good shape and ready to go. Whats the worse that can happen with the middle wheel screwed? the track seems adjusted correctly and its in good shape. My machine is a 2003 Mountain Viper. PLEASE voice opinions.

  2. #2
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    The worst that can happen is you totally crap that bearing allowing the idler wheel to turn sideways far enough to shred the track. I wouldn't ride, I'd replace it.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    The worst that can happen is you totally crap that bearing allowing the idler wheel to turn sideways far enough to shred the track. I wouldn't ride, I'd replace it.
    I agree! The bearing is a $10 part and takes maybe 20 minutes to change. Not worth the risk.

  4. #4
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    I'd head north a little later than usual and stop in Wasilla or Big Lake on the way to get a new idler. Change it on the trailer and go ride. Take the proper sockets and a cordless and it'll be a snap.

    Anybody using a cordless impact? Wow those things are handy for fixing snow-gos!

  5. #5
    Member Jktimm's Avatar
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    Default I disagree...

    I would ride it. Keep to the snow for some lube, but worst case is it rattles around in there.
    No big deal to replace it, but I would do it at home in the garage, and check the other bearings at the same time.

  6. #6
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    Default Hey

    Ok, so I've never replaced an idler wheel before. It looks daunting because the track has to be taken off. Is this pretty straight forward or is it something a shop should do if I've never done it?. I do have decent mechanical skills however. After the track comes off how do I adjust it properly? Will I need special tools or will common tools be all I need?. Any manuals out there that will help me?.

  7. #7
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    The track doesn't need to come off and I don't recall the skid needing to be removed. Just loosen the rear axle and work from the side. To loosen a Yami track you loosen the nuts on the rear idlers on both sides, then align the track windows to see the adjuster nuts that point straight back off the assembly, put a socket on an extension through the track windows and loosen. Then you can remove the parts from the sides. Just pay attention to spacers and washers and make sure they go back in correctly.

    To re-tighten the track just reverse the process. You should have about 1 1/2" of track drop @ 10# or something close. See your manual for the exact spec. When you get to the correct tension block the rear of the machine up and run it enough to spin the track. Make sure the track is centered on both rails. If it rides to one side, loosen that side and/or tighten the other side to center it. Keep checking it until the track runs true. Re-tighten the axle nuts, and you're finished.

    If you're intimidated by this try to recruit a friend who's done it or take it to a shop and ask if you can watch them fix it so you can learn. Repair skills come in handy when you're broken down in the boonies.

  8. #8
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    The main reason bearing go bad is water get into the steel balls and rust them out. I remove the seal and pack the bearing with grease and put the seal back on. This trick adds years to a bearing life. When it comes to water and bearing there is no such thing as to much grease. I also grease every zerk ounce a month even the ones on the jack shaft. Those are the ones no body know about.

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