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Thread: FYI: Eating grizzly meat

  1. #1

    Default FYI: Eating grizzly meat

    I know that a lot of folks will not eat grizzly meat, so I thought I'd pass this along. Mind you, this bear was STUFFING himself w/ rotten salmon, so this is probably as bad as a griz gets; these were hind legs, btw. I just got my meat from the butcher; hot dogs, pepperoni and Italian sausage. The dogs have a "flavor" which reflects what my partner described as "organ meat" when we sampled it in the field. The flavor far exceeds liver, but is behind beef dogs that you get at the stadium while watching the Browns beat the Giants. Unfortunately, those were one-time hot dogs, never to be seen again. The pepperoni sticks are pretty hot for me, but probably just right for most folks. Good, just a tad hot. The sausage is pretty much like any sausage I've ever eaten; perhaps a tad strong, but pretty good. I tasted the spices (Oregano-like) more than the meat. Now I am really sorry that I did not take any meat from the spring griz I got a few years ago; I bet it would have been real tasty. Anyone else have any griz meat comments?

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    I eat Grizz as well the one we got this spring was in full rut and had JUST gotten his tail kicked by a sow... he was tough and a little strong on the gamy side.. sausage he is ..... kind of like a bull moose in rut... not bad just different.
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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    wow you guys make it sound sooooo yummy....lol
    i've had it once and it was good, but for health reasons i won't eat it agian or pig. something about eating animals that have bacteria in the meat already...yummmy.
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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Cool it's not chicken...

    Simply for "gee-whiz purposes" I have eaten bworn bear meat two times. It was not great. It was not good enough to eat again. Its does not "taste like chicken". It is not "the other white meat". I'm not eating it again.
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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Best left to the ravens and magpies.

  6. #6

    Smile

    I have eaten spring grizzly that was just as good as black bear. As far as bacteria goes, you eat it all the time. Better when well done however
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    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default Cooked Wrong?

    (Its does not "taste like chicken". It is not "the other white meat".)

    I thought every thing tasted like chicken if you cooked it right? I personaly do not eat it, but will eat Blackies.
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    Bear are best shot for reasons other than eating. Thats one meat i wont eat.

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    Default Not eating

    Right now my freezer is full of...in order from tastiest to tasty

    Buffalo (a friend was feeling philanthropic)
    Sheep
    Deer
    Moose (even though he one of the best I've eaten)
    Goat

    Sorry, but grizzly doesn't even approach my radar...

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    I ate meat off of one spring brownie & it was fine, Several others all tasted it at the same time & no one found it offensive. If it all tastes like that I shure wouldn't toss it.
    Love good black bear. My wife's moose roast was my family's favorite meal until she cooked her 1st black bear roast last year. Now they lean that way although the moose is still almost neck-n-neck.
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    Member Cast&Blast's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Griz sure is tasty!

    I'm not a big fan of eating Griz, though I ate a significant amount of this year's spring boar. Over the campfire it was (of course) the best meat ever; but then again so are dirt pancakes in the field. I was absolutely amazed by it's taste (as was my hunting partner) that we carved off a significant amount that he brought home. He made jerky, steaks, and roasts. (I've since heard not to make jerky from bear as it does not kill the bacteria/parasites)? Too late for me, but I'll not eat it again because of the associated health risks. If fish and game recommends not eating it, (that's what the dude told me over the phone) and you know they are sticklers on harvest requirements, then there must be a real possibility of infection. With that being said, I'm sticking to sheep, moose, caribou, etc.; and besides there is no way my wife will let me put bear meat in the freezer (that's the first line she's ever drawn). It was sure tasty though....

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I have watched natives eat blue seal meat while turning their nose up at griz,thats good enough for me.

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    Default hatcher pass

    I've eaten parts of 2 spring griz from Hatcher's Pass. Both were excellent, rivalling good black bear for flavor. If you enjoy spring blackies, dont' pass up spring griz. As for bacteria, we carry E. Coli in our own guts: all meat carries E. coli and other bacteria. USDA sets "allowable levels" for all bacteria, including E. Coli. There is not a zero tolerance policy, 'cause its impossible. It is only when those bacteria are allowed to flourish that it becomes a problem. Heck, spinach and tomatoes were responsible for huge E. coli outbreaks! In meat plants, proper hide removal is most important for keeping bacteria levels down, then proper cleaning of any foreign matter on the meat, and prompt cooling. Proper hide removal means keeping as much of the junk thats on the hide on the hide, not on the meat. Follow the same steps with bear meat, and it will be fine. Don't get a bunch of crap and gut material on the meat, remove any that you do see by trimming, and cool the meat quickly. Freezing meat will kill a lot of bugs, and whatever processing technique you use, just heat it to 160* and it will kill any remaining critters. When you're eating your meal, whether bear, moose, deer, or any commercially obtained meat, just think of it as a "multi-cultural" meal.

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    It's not e-coli that is a concern with under cooked pork and bear, it's trichinosis. http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/DS/00689.html
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    Mix enough pork with it and anything tastes good, even merganser!
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    I believe that the FDA gives two options for properly 'curing' pork that's used in sausage making for items such as landjaeger, where the sausage ferments and isn't actually hot smoked or cooked, per se'. The one method was to maintain a temperature of roughly 151 degrees f. for a specific period of time (which doesn't do many sellect sausage recipes any good, if the meat's pre-cooked, even tho' slowly).

    The other method was the same process that they advise for sashimi; to let the pork (or bear, I'd imagine) be frozen at -15 f. or colder for several days before using in what ever product (such as jerky, for example.)

    I was told of this by the fellow in charge of processing meats at Bavarian Meat Products (Seattle, Washington), where I got my traditional landjaeger for hunting season this last Fall.

    That said, I've eaten grizzly from McBride, B.C., back in the summer of 1978. It had been jarred/canned in Ball jars with carrots, and perhaps onions. There was nothing wrong with it from what I remember, and I've since been waiting on a friend to give me a shoulder roast or two of grizzly or brown bear meat to try with my corned meat recipe. (I just cooked up a batch of brine tonight for several moose roasts I'm brining for moose rubens next week, as well as corned moose with cabbage, and corned moose hash.)

    I nolonger eat much bear meat fresh or fresh-frozen, but have eaten quite a lot of black bear meat that I 'canned' in Ball jars.

    I haven't killed a bear since July 1987, and have no intention at this time of going out of my way to change that claim.

  17. #17

    Default interesting opinions

    As usual, any question elicits the full gamut of responses. I don't have any more fear of "bugs" in bear than any other meat intellectually, but I am more careful w/ it for some reason. Cook it well and wear gloves when you handle it, esp in the field where you are more likely to get cut (or already have) and are more likely to be dirty to start with. Listeria is in the soil/fish, etc. E. coli is everywhere. Trichinosis is in pigs. Tape worms are in some fish meat (nope. I won't EVEN eat sushi). As for flavor, I don't like caribou or sheep, but I bet once it is sliced/diced/spiced into pepperoni, etc, it would be quite good. Lamb? God, I wouldn't eat that stuff w/ someone else's mouth! Different taste buds on different folks. I'll let you all know my opinion of the next brown bear. In the meantime, happy eating. j

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    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Exclamation Wait! Different Trich!!

    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    I believe that the FDA gives two options for properly 'curing' pork ...

    The other method was the same process that they advise for sashimi; to let the pork (or bear, I'd imagine) be frozen at -15 f. or colder for several days before using in what ever product (such as jerky, for example.)
    You can't kill Alaska trichinosis by freezing!

    It's just a very slightly different variant of the trichinosis parasite. Scientific studies have failed to kill it with long freezing and deep freezing. I think I once posted a link to an Alaska Department of Health & Social Services, Division of Epidemiology bulletin on this.

    Makes sense when you think about it - the trich in a dead seal or walrus may need to survive freezing through a loooong cold winter before being scavenged by a bear and continuing its genes in the new host.

    So while domestic pork is trichinosis free after some serious time in serious cold (I'm remembering 10 days at -20, but I'm not positive), bears seals and walruses from Alaskan climates are not. We grow our parasites hardy.

    Cook the meat thoroughly.

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    Thanks for the heads-up, 8x57 Mauser.

    I know that echinococcus granulosis in Alaska has been reported to have at least two different strains that behave differently (St. Laurence Island vs. mainland), but I wasn't aware of the evolved strain of trichinosis up here. EG is also found in LOTS of wild game and fish. In dogs it's quite grotesque. In persons, the mainland variety rarely even lets the 'host' know it's there.

    I -can- tell you that the commercial meat processors I spoke with didn't indicate anything like 20 days for trichinosis in domestic pork. I believe that -15 was baseline, and that the colder the temps, the shorter the 'hold time.'

    J.K., I'll eat your share of sushi, especially with wasabi and pickled ginger... hold the soy sauce as it just gets in the way.

    I can any/most bear that I've killed or received in the last 28 years; cooked once loose in chunks, roughly 20-25 lbs of cleaned meat at a time, in a pressure canner, and a second time in the pressure canner in pint jars, with the grease dilluted with water, and spices added.

    Never had any complaints, though once at a grad. school pot-luck down south, I made a batch of what I called 'bear-lasche.' A woman there who was about 8 months pregnant asked me what it was, and I told her 'Bearlasche.'.. She asked me what -that- was, and I told her, simply, "It's a lot like 'goolash', but with more bear than goo." She puked. Literally. Immediately. And folks had the nerve to be mad at me!! After I'd donated good meat, spent time cooking, made a very palitable dish, and she even said it was good herself, right up until she was informed as to what she was eating.

    'Mind over matter' sucks sometimes. Or, in this case, blows... chunks, to be specific...

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default that right thar

    is very funny indeed - !

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