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Thread: hauling plywood..on a narrow trail

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    Default hauling plywood..on a narrow trail

    Im finishing up a cabin and hauled most material this summer, but will need about 20 more sheet of plywood and would like to haul them this winter..
    The problem is the trail, or lack of, I have about 2 miles of narrow trapline trail, anyone have a slick set-up for hauling plywood on edge?

  2. #2
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I would imagine an "A frame" style setup would work the best. Split the load in half and lean the sheets against each other with the base spread as wide as possible. You will probably need some other weight in the bottom of the sled to keep it from rolling since the center of gravity will be pretty high. Maybe a few sandbags in the bottom between the sheets?

    How wide can you comfortably go?
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    I have a pull sled that would work.
    32 inch wide, 8 feet long and the back can be remove for longer lumber, X 16 high. all alu with UHMW on the bottom.

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    Not many snowmachines will go through much less than 48". If a standard snowgo will get through your plywood will probably go laying down. After lots of years of hauling my advice is to borrow a bander and some steel banding to secure the plywood in a tidy stack. I've hauled lots of lumber through the trees and a tight load makes a world of difference.

  5. #5

    Default just idea

    im like mr pid i haul all my cabin stuff by machine
    and i would do a few trips to establish the trail and
    widen it just a bit my riding one ski over the edge
    and then i would haul it laying down unless you just
    cant do to trees and if that is the case its just a slow
    go so when it goes over you dont hurt your self

  6. #6

    Default split the sheets

    My partner and I hauled about 100 sheets out 60 miles on narrow trail. We found it much easier to split the sheets in half so you only have 24" wide sheets. They will lay flat on a flat sled and you don't have to worry about hitting corners, etc.

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    Member Jktimm's Avatar
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    Default I'm with northway...

    I would suggest ripping the sheets to 24" and laying flat. The sheets are even easier to work with (alone) when you are putting them up. There's really no down side to ripping them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jktimm View Post
    I would suggest ripping the sheets to 24" and laying flat. The sheets are even easier to work with (alone) when you are putting them up. There's really no down side to ripping them.
    If the plywood is for wall sheeting you can forget about 16" stud spacing. Or forget ripping the plywood. Think it through before you rip anything.

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    Member Rich_in_AK's Avatar
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    Default Ripping plywood

    What is wrong with installing the 24" wide plywood horizontally?

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    Interior- Grain runs the wrong way and you have too many seams. Not very pretty.

    Exterior- In an 8' wall you'll have three horizontal seams to catch water rather than zero. Also not pretty.

    Floor? Squeak, squeak, squeak.

    Like I said, measure your standard sized snowmachine. A 48" wide load is rarely a problem, and I say that having hauled a lot of them.

  11. #11

    Default All depends on your trail

    On the trail that I use, 48" sheets just aren't going to work. My machine has a 36" in stance, so I would have to have a wide sled to get the 48" sheets. We've hauled materials for 60 miles and splitting was what worked for us. The first load we tried with 48" sheets ended up having corners busted off, etc. In general on our trail it was tougher than heck. Once we split the sheets, hauling became much easier and even machines less than widetracks could haul good loads.

    You do make a good point about the studs on 16" centers! We put the plywood horizontally and sealed with silicon if we thought the seem had a gap. Cabins are "tight" and stay warm even in the coldest conditions. For the floor, lots of screws to keep it from squeaking!

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    Another trick is to build a crib for 48" plywood. If the plywood is sitting on a 45* angle the load is only 24" wide and the weight is still balanced across the base of the sled. Necessity is the mother of invention. Long loads are much tougher than wide ones.

    Hopefully we get a good winter. So far it has promise!

  13. #13
    Member Rich_in_AK's Avatar
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    Default plywood

    Unless you have a very level packed trail, a top heavy load with high center of gravity on a narrow sled of 36" will end up tipping over often. You will spend much time reloading the sled every time it tips. Just ask me how I know this

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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Another trick is to build a crib for 48" plywood. If the plywood is sitting on a 45* angle the load is only 24" wide and the weight is still balanced across the base of the sled.
    Actually, at 45* a 48" load would be 34" wide, and the center of gravity would be 17" above the sled deck.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
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    Member Rich_in_AK's Avatar
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    True, if you only haul one sheet at a time ! The more you stack up the higher it goes.

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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Exactly.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  17. #17
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Use a chainsaw and make the trail wider. Most people would appreciate that.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
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    For you other freight pullers, say you have 6 full 55 gallon drums to haul. How do you do it? How many trips? What kind of sled(s)? How do you load and secure?

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    Default re: ripping your ply...

    If you have 16" centers you could rip the sheets down to 32" and use the cutoffs for soffits or shelving.? It's easy to find a use for sheetgood pcs at a cabin out in the middle of nowhere.

  20. #20
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    The last time I hauled a stack of plywood (20 shts of 1/2 CDX) I did it flat. I banded it together and centered it on the sled. I then took two 1x6x12"s and nailed them along the sides of the plywood stack, pulling the last 4' together like the bow on a boat. I then strapped it all down super tight. The bow ended 6" short of the end of my hitch and allowed the front of the plywood stack to glance off whatever trees and brush I encountered.

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