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Thread: Radiant Heat

  1. #1
    Member Michael's Avatar
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    Default Radiant Heat

    Anybody using an in floor heating system or similar?

  2. #2
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    we have radiant throughout our floors and walls .. quite a unique setup but keeps the whole house warm... That's in glennallen

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Thumbs up love it

    I have it and I love it. I would not use anything else. I am also a commerical carpenter and see it used very often. The intial cost is a bit steep but after that it will pay for itself. plus if the power goes out the house still stays warm. It takes a long time to bleed all that warmth. out of the gypecrete. I give it a big thumbs up.
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  4. #4
    Member Michael's Avatar
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    ret25yo,

    We have got to get together in the Glenn. My wife is coming down here on Tuesday and should be back up there over the weekend or next Monday. I will PM you when I know for sure. I would really like to see your setup.

    Thanks,

  5. #5
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    yeah let me know .... its on an you can come see it (everything is visible .. nothing hidden large crawlspace ...just let me know ..

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  6. #6
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    We have radiant heat, but would never suggest it if you were solely using heating oil for it. Last year it costed us an arm and a leg for it. This year we installed a wood boiler system and it is WONDERFUL.

    We heat almost 2200sq/ft of living space and our hangar with radiant heat. It's worth it!
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  7. #7

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    I put one of those in floor tile warming mats (muds in under the tile) in the bathroom when I built my cabin. I love it. Warm tiles on the toes are awesome.

  8. #8

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    radiant heat here. thats all we use.

  9. #9
    Member Bushpilot's Avatar
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    I started a thread on this almost a year ago, and got some great responses. Might want to check it out.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=23326
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  10. #10
    Member Michael's Avatar
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    So does anyone have an opinion on using pex tubing in the clips with the mylar insulation creating an airspace or with the aluminum heat sinks and spray foam sprayed onto the aluminum.

    Thanks,

  11. #11
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    My personal opinion is that infloor heat works best with some sort of concrete. Either in a concrete slab or with gypcrete over your sublfloor.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    So does anyone have an opinion on using pex tubing in the clips with the mylar insulation creating an airspace or with the aluminum heat sinks and spray foam sprayed onto the aluminum.

    Thanks,
    I have that system, but I'm an Outsider in Montana. Nothing in gypcrete or concrete.

    Reason I did it that way is that mine was a retrofit and I have a crawl space and it was "easy" (wrestling tubing, making manifolds, putting up clips, putting on "heat spreader" things, stapling up insulation, took forever!) compared to pouring gypcrete.

    It works fine, warms up very quickly but also cools down quicker than if I had a bigger heat sink (gypcrete).

    My opinion is to focus MUCH more in complete and top-notch insulation than the particular heat system. If you took the difference in cost between a forced air and radiant and put it into super insulated windows, thicker spray-in insulation, foundation insulation, etc. I think you'd be farther ahead. Of course, if you can do both (radiant and super insulation) you're way ahead.

    Every dollar you put into insulation and a good heat system is money in the bank in the future. It WILL provide positive cash flow if you finance the system in a normal home loan.

  13. #13
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    My personal opinion is that infloor heat works best with some sort of concrete. Either in a concrete slab or with gypcrete over your sublfloor.
    We have gypcrete and our radiant heat works wonderfully. You can do it yourself, but it can be tricky. We did it ourselves, but my husband had the gypcrete delivered and he was able to do it on his own. It only took overnight to dry. It might be quicker if you have one of those diesel heaters or a propane heater. We have used both. One is a commercial size heater and that has been one of the best investments with our continuous construction work in our home.
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  14. #14
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Gypcrete is cool. I love how it self levels and how easy it is to deal with. Of course, it's way easier if you just call Janes Brothers and have them do it for you
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    Floor heating is nice but I still love my air heating

  16. #16
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbswasilla View Post
    Floor heating is nice but I still love my air heating
    Air heating is not always offered everywhere in Alaska.
    It's nice to have forced air heat (natural gas) but in the Fairbanks area, they have what's called 'district heat' and only less than 5% of Fairbanks actually has that. The rest of us are on those ol' boiler systems. With the recent price(s) of heating oil costs, radiant heat can become a costly way of heating.
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  17. #17

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    you can get a oil fired furnace. Forced air just means a furnace and duct system not natural gas. I agree in-floor is much nicer though and quieter.

  18. #18
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan g View Post
    you can get a oil fired furnace. Forced air just means a furnace and duct system not natural gas. I agree in-floor is much nicer though and quieter.
    I was just simply explaining that it's harder to obtain natural gas in the interior is all. It's not readily accessable. It's trucked up from Anchorage and costly, but people absolutely still use it in our area. Personally, it's not logical to use it for us.
    We have a dual system. Wood boiler as well as Oil Boiler. When there is not enough wood in the wood boiler and it gets under 120degrees, it switches to the Oil Boiler.
    Yes, I will absolutely agree with you that in-floor is much nicer as well as quieter. We really enjoy our radiant heat.
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  19. #19

    Default Radiant floor heat

    We built a log house and installed tubing in concrete slab in the basement. Installed tubing in wood subfloor upstairs. We are heating over 3,000 sq. ft. and average under 5 gallons of oil burned per day during the cold months. Very nice heat and efficient and we have a very simple system....no advanced controls, etc. House is not drafty and holds heat for a long time. I believe it is well worth the initial investment especially in fuel savings but also in comfort.

  20. #20
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default one advantage

    So , my son has a problem with his Transfer caseon his truck.
    its about -20 at the warmest part of the day..
    We are in our garage with the ceiling mounted Modine heater going wide open..
    ( Natural gas fan blower furnace)
    I get down on the floor of the garage and after a while of layin on that cold cement floor.. I crawl out of there ,, and when I stand up,, its like 90 degrees up where my head is,, and about 40 degrees down on the floor..
    So anyway.. we get the transfer case out and find one for sale on craigslist.
    I am talking to a neighbor of ours about putting the replacement back in and I tell him I am not looking forward to crawling around on the cold old cement floor..
    He says come on over and put that transfer case in your sons truck at my place, I have a heated slab floor in my garage..
    So we do..... "and that is all I need to say about that"...(forest Gump)
    and this summer we will have a heated slab in our garage too, and I will have a Modine Garage heater for sale on Swap and sale.. here next fall..
    Max
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