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Thread: Range finder

  1. #1
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    Default Range finder

    I am looking to buy a new nikon range finder. I have been looking to buy the 1200 yard one but looking at the 800 now. Not sure if I am selling myself short, the only advantage is 400 yards, not that I can shoot 800-1200 yards but just knowing how far away an object or animal is helps out. I have owned an 800 yard range finder already. Just would like to hear others views on this on getting the 1200 or 800.

    Thanks Chipenn

  2. #2

    Default MY .02 cents

    I'll go ahead a post my limited experiance with rangefinders since no one else has...The past two years I've borrowed two different rangefinders and took them on sheep hunts. The first one had a range of 500 or 550yds and the best range I could get out of it was about 270yds. This past season I took out a 1,200 yarder and the best I got out of it was a little over 700yds. Moral of the story is you can expect about half the distance of what the things are rated at. I've concluded, after doing some research, that it depends on the surface your shooting at. I think makers of these things rate theirs on max distance shooting at a large, flat, reflective surface and an animal, tree, or rock is neither. Hope this was useful, Robert

  3. #3

    Default

    I've been using a Leica CRF 1200 for all my hunting this year and the furthest I have ranged anything was a little over 1100 yards. I bought it mainly for sheep hunting since it can be difficult to guesstimate ranges in the mountains. I would never consider shooting out past 400 yards but I didn't really buy the range finder for the purpose of shooting long range, I bought it to tell me how far my target was so I would know how much closer I need to get, if that makes any sense.

  4. #4
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    Default

    We use range finders as our time permits while hunting and find them to be extremely useful.
    I currently own a Leica and a Bushnell model. If the 1200 yard model costs more I would not spend the extra money for it. 800 is to far to shoot as it is.
    Tennessee

  5. #5
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    Default

    I have a Nikon Monarch 800. It works ok but not near as well as the Lieca CRF 1200 that my friend has. I have got the Nikon to range a little over 500. It is definitely slower at giving the range and the Leica is easily 3 times as bright. I would say save up your jingle and buy a Leica CRF 900 or 1200. We actually had the crf 1200 report 1300 a couple times. It is VERY fast at returning the distance also. But, I bought the Nikon new for around $200, it's small, light and does the job out to about 500yds.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    I have a Nikon Monarch 800. It works ok but not near as well as the Lieca CRF 1200 that my friend has. I have got the Nikon to range a little over 500. It is definitely slower at giving the range and the Leica is easily 3 times as bright. I would say save up your jingle and buy a Leica CRF 900 or 1200. We actually had the crf 1200 report 1300 a couple times. It is VERY fast at returning the distance also. But, I bought the Nikon new for around $200, it's small, light and does the job out to about 500yds.
    Great advise!! I ranged a black bear with a CRF 1200 this year at 756 yards! It returned the yardage very rapidly even at that distance on a soft target.

  7. #7

    Default Leica

    +1 for Leica. Leica has great optics and with their 7x magnification it allows you to see the target. It also allows you to SCAN the target as it moves the range is amended as the target moves closer or farther away; as long as you hold the button down and keep the target in the box.They have great lens quality. I have a Leica LRF 900 scan. It's a little bit larger than the CRF but holds easier as you can use 2 hands like binoculars. It uses a standard 9 volt alkaline battery NOT the little CR2s or whatever that cost $7-9 bucks apiece. It delivers a red digital read out fast and accurately. The target box is small enough it allows you to pick the target not just the area for a range.Off of a non-reflective target like a moose it has read out to 450 yds. I've never needed to shoot that far so I'm happy with it and Leicas quality.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  8. #8

    Default Leupold RX IV Boone and Crocket

    For my birthday, my wife bought me a Leupold Boone and Crocket range finder. Have not gotten to take it hunting yet, but it has alot of cool features on it. True ballistic range for shooting up and down hills, 6 different cross hairs for more precise ranging, "rain" setting for ranging through fog or snow(I ranged a building at 774 yds through snow fall) first and last target settings when you have mutiple targets in the same range window, and then the coolest option, the Boone and Crocket scale. It allows you to measure width between 10" and 60". Very helpful with our antler restrictions. It is also very accurate. So far, I would recommend it.

    Jdub

  9. #9
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    Default Decision made

    Thanks everyone for the advice. Like most of you I wanted the range finder for the the purpose of knowing how much closer I need to get. I will only shoot out to around 400 yards if the conditions are good. I went ahead and purchased the Nikon 1200, a little more in my price range and Nikon has been good over the years to me.

    Thanks again for your inputs.

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