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Thread: No Lee dealers? Really?

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    Default No Lee dealers? Really?

    Hi guys, I'm not new to the AOD but I'm new to reloading. I tried searching the handloading forum but I didn't see any posts that covered this subject.

    I've looked at some RCBS stuff and I want to compare it to the Lee Loader but according to Lee's website, the closest dealer is in Kenai. Is there really nobody that sells Lee in Anchorage or the Valley?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bookseller View Post
    Hi guys, I'm not new to the AOD but I'm new to reloading. I tried searching the handloading forum but I didn't see any posts that covered this subject.

    I've looked at some RCBS stuff and I want to compare it to the Lee Loader but according to Lee's website, the closest dealer is in Kenai. Is there really nobody that sells Lee in Anchorage or the Valley?
    It's been over a year since I was in Sportsmans Warehouse, but at that time they had a bunch of it.

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    Thanks BrownBear we just happen to headed out to Wasilla tomorrow. Strange that the Lee site doesn't have SW listed yet.

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    SW has a few lee products and Gun traders has a few but I'm not aware of any Anchorage store with more than a few items. And thats to bad because Lee makes some really good products especially for the money. But they also make some stuff that is not so good so it would be nice to get hands on before buying.

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    You can buy direct from Lee's website. Other mail order/web dealers have Lee products cheaper, but often screw you on the shipping. *cough*Midway*cough*

    I just bought a mould from Lee, it showed up at my door three days later. Paid $4 for shipping, it cost them $4.80 in postage.

    Lee's stuff may look 'weaker' compaired to others, but I've never had anything of Lee's break.

  6. #6

    Default mountain view sports

    Mountain view sports carries some lee stuff. They had a couple presses and some accessories in there last time I looked but that was a couple months ago. They have the catalogs too and can order anything you want for you. I had them order a crimp die for me and the shipping was less than the lee website. Might give them a try if you're in the neighborhood.

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    Thanks for all the info guys. With what I've read so far I'm interested in checking out Lee's anniversary kit but it doesn't sound like I'll be able to find it around here. I suppose I could order it but I wanted the instant gratification thing.

    I'm off to SW tomorrow to check them out. Thanks again.

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    Default Where to buy Lee Anniversary Kit

    Sportsman's Warehouse is OK, but Mountain View Sports (From the corner of 46th and Old Seward, head south and turn right just past New Sagaya and immeidate left into Mt. View Sports parking lot.)

    They are good folks there. I bought their anniversary press kit several months ago (for the book, actually), so if you want a press immediately and Mt View doesn't have one, mine has never even been out of the box, but I'm keepin' the book. email me at ljschulr@alaska.net. I will check around 9 AM

    Lost Sheep.

    By the way, the kit you are talking about is the simple press, not the full kit, scale, lube pad, press, and all the little peripherals, right? What I got is just the press and the book only.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Sheep View Post
    By the way, the kit you are talking about is the simple press, not the full kit, scale, lube pad, press, and all the little peripherals, right? What I got is just the press and the book only.
    Thanks Lost Sheep but the one I meant was the the 50th Anniversary Kit. I spent last night and this morning looking at all the different kits and since I'm starting from scratch I've decided that the 50th Anniversary kit is the way I want to go. It doesn't sound like I'll be able to pick that kit up locally though.

    I don't think I need the turret press as I really don't do a lot of shooting and therefore I won't need to reload lots of rounds. I have a model 94 30-30 and 300 win mag and I guarantee you I don't do a lot of shooting with the 300. That dang thing starts to hurt after 10 rounds or so. I might also end up with a 30.06 but for now the only other caliber I would be reloading is my .44 mag pistol rounds which brings up another stupid beginner's question. Can you reload pistol ammo with the 50th Anniversary kit? It doesn't say you can't but it doesn't say you can either.

    Last question and then I'll shut up. I watched a few Utube videos about using the Lee kits and one guy mentioned a problem with reloading lever action rounds (30-30) with the Lee loader. Really?

    Thanks guys, sorry for all the basic questions.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bookseller View Post
    I watched a few Utube videos about using the Lee kits and one guy mentioned a problem with reloading lever action rounds (30-30) with the Lee loader. Really?
    I'll bet you dollars to donuts that he wasn't trimming the cases.

    Cases stretch a tiny bit when reloaded, and sooner or later need to be trimmed. It's especially important with cases like the 30-30 that are intended to be used in tubular magazines. Those have to have their mouths crimped slightly into the groove (cannelure) on a bullet to keep recoil from driving the bullets deeper into the case while they're waiting in that tubular magazine for their turn in the chamber.

    Problem is, as the cases get longer while you're seating the bullets to the same depth in the case, and eventually you are trying to crimp the case mouth further up the bullet where there's no cannelure. Something has to give, and that usually means a bulge in the case neck right below the crimp. Doesn't even have to be big enough for you to notice, but it will cause chambering difficulties, and potentially dangerous pressures.

    I'd make sure your reloading outfit includes a case trimmer, especially since you are loading 30-30. Then I'd use it like a new religion.

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    Bookseller asked (in part):
    I don't think I need the turret press as I really don't do a lot of shooting and therefore I won't need to reload lots of rounds. ... ... but for now the only other caliber I would be reloading is my .44 mag pistol rounds which brings up another stupid beginner's question. Can you reload pistol ammo with the 50th Anniversary kit? It doesn't say you can't but it doesn't say you can either.
    End quote

    Don't get turret and progressive mixed up. Turret presses operate just like a single stage press, but you can leave the dies set up and adjusted right in the turret and rotate whichever die is being used into the operating position. To switch dies, you just rotate the turret instead of removing the die and putting in the next die, and readjusting it. When you change calibers, you can just pull the whole turret head, dies and all (if you bought extra turret heads). Very convenient.

    Once you start loading for your handgun, you will find yourself shooting a whole lot more. Maybe not enough to justify getting a progressive, but someday you may start to wonder.

    Here are a couple of threads I found interesting
    http://forums.accuratereloading.com/eve
    http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543
    http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/view...fbd5ae1f754eec

    Also, by way of free advice, which you did not ask for, but I had left over from another post.


    Welcome to the forum, and be warned, welcome to your new obsession.

    So much is a matter of personal taste. All advice carries this caveat, "your mileage may vary".

    When I started reloading 30 years ago, everything fit in a footlocker. I mounted an RCBS Jr on a 2x6 and wedged it in a nightstand drawer. I still don't use a bench to reload on, just a Black&Decker folding workbench.

    I found "The ABC's of Reloading" to be a very good reference, unlike another advisor. Short on data, yes, but I found it full of knowledge and understanding of the process. Check out offereings in your local library. Dated, perhaps, but you can taste-test their writing style. Richard Lee's book "Modern Reloading" has a lot of food for thought, and does discuss the reasoning behind his opinions (unlike many manuals, and postings). Whether right or wrong, the issues merit thought, which that book initiates. It is not a simple book, though and you will find it provocative reading for many years.

    To appreciate my advice, you should know something about my experience and style. I load for handguns. I started because when I bought my first revolver, I knew I could not afford to shoot factory ammo, so figured the price of the press, etc. in along with the price of the gun. I bought an entire sport, not just a piece of equipment.

    Read your manual(s) first for the discussion of the how-to steps. Load data is good, but the powder manufacturers and bullet manufacturers may have better information and their web sites are probably more up to date. But pay attention to what the ammunition was test-fired from. (regular firearm vs a sealed-breech pressure test barrel)

    I started loading with the guy who sold me my press watching over my shoulder as I loaded my first 6 rounds to make sure I did not blow myself up, load a powderless cartridge or set off a primer in the press. There is nothing like a tutor, or better yet, a mentor. A longer mentoring period might have changed my reloading style, but I learned a lot in those first 6 rounds, as he explained each step. Then I educated myself after that.

    There are instructional videos now that did not exist in the '70s.

    Load mid-range or slightly light at first so poor ignition or overpressures are not concerns. Just concentrate on getting the loading steps right and being VERY VERY consistent (charge weight, crimp strength, seating depth, primer seating force, all that)

    You will probably spill powder or drop a primer, so consider what you have for floor covering when you pick your reloading room. (Note: my worktable is portable).

    For straightwalled cases, Tungsten Carbide dies do not require lubrication like tool steel does. Save time, spend the extra $10-$15.

    Wear eye protection when loading and don't pinch your fingers in the press.

    Good luck.

    Larry (Lost Sheep)

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    Thanks Brownbear. I figured it had to be something simple as that was the only mention of it I had found.

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    Wow Lost Sheep, your post must have gone up while I was typing the other one to Brown Bear. That was a great amount of good info there, thank you.

    Now for the update.

    I ended up going to Mountain View Sports today and they actually had one 50th Anniversary Kit there! Woo Hoo! They also had the Turret Kit but I decided to go with the regular press so I got the 50th kit. I managed to get everything I need to start some reloading except they didn't have any of the dies I need for my weapons so I'm going to have to go out looking on Monday I guess. The guy at the counter recommended Great Northern guns which is where I bought my .44 so I'll start there.

    BTW, if you're looking for powder, don't go to Mountain View without calling them first. They were running out of everything.

    Thanks for all the info guys. I really appreciate it. I'm sure I'll probably run into problems somewhere and be back here hat in hand looking for more help but for now I'm looking forward to getting everything set up and giving it a try next week.

    .

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