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Thread: Good jerky recipe for Buffalo?

  1. #1
    Member stack's Avatar
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    Default Good jerky recipe for Buffalo?

    Hello all,
    I am new to making jerky and looking for a recipe for Buffalo meat. So far my jerky has turned out only ok to blaa. Also have some venison I want to make into jerky too.

    Any help would be great.

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Check out this site lots of ggod stuff also


    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/forums/index.php
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    You're welcome to try my venison jerky recipe. I do this in a convection oven, but should work in a smoker.

    Subject: Jerky Recipe



    Smoked Venison Jerky

    3-5 lb. venison
    1 cup soy sauce
    1 cup Worcestershire sauce
    1 cup apple or orange juice (I perfer apple)
    1/4 cup sugar (I use karo)
    1 T. liquid smoke
    1 1/2 tsp. garlic salt
    1/2 tsp. pepper (I use 1 tbsp.)
    1/2 tsp. mustard seed
    l tsp. mustard powder
    l tsp. onion powder
    3/4 tsp. garlic powder

    Cut partially frozen meat into 1/4 inch slices being sure to cut with the
    grain for chewy jerky, against the grain for brittle jerky. Combine all
    ingredients and marinate meat in refrigerator overnight. Stir occasionally (I put it in the brine for 8 to 10 hours). Drain in sieve.

    Arrange strips of meat on rack with newspaper underneath for dripping
    juices. Sprinkle black pepper on meat and then place meat in oven until meat is thoroughly dry, at l50 degree convection oven for 6 to 8 hours.)

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    This jerky recipe is easyÖ and I bet it would work well with Buffalo too.

    Cut thin strips of meat across the grain anywhere from 3 inches to 6 inches long (I generally use good cut of moose or caribou so it wonít be too chewy even if overdried)

    Marinate overnight in:

    2 cups soy sauce
    1 cup brown sugar
    ľ cup dried minced onion (is using fresh, mince it fine so it wonít fall off)
    1 TBSP course black pepper

    If you like garlic sprinkle some in
    If you like spicy, add red or cayenne pepper

    Then since I donít have any fancy driers or gizmoís I skewer each piece on a 2 to 3 foot long willow stick. Keeping each far enough apart so they donít touch or fold over.

    Hang outdoors if the weather is hot and dry under a net or screen so the bugs canít get in.
    Or in winter or wet weather hang over or near the wood stove until done.

    Depending on your temps and the thickness of the slices it will be done in a day or two.
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Default Good choices

    Thanks everyone, got some real good choices. I'll let you know how it goes.

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    Smile 1st one I try'd

    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    You're welcome to try my venison jerky recipe. I do this in a convection oven, but should work in a smoker.

    Subject: Jerky Recipe



    Smoked Venison Jerky

    3-5 lb. venison
    1 cup soy sauce
    1 cup Worcestershire sauce
    1 cup apple or orange juice (I perfer apple)
    1/4 cup sugar (I use karo)
    1 T. liquid smoke
    1 1/2 tsp. garlic salt
    1/2 tsp. pepper (I use 1 tbsp.)
    1/2 tsp. mustard seed
    l tsp. mustard powder
    l tsp. onion powder
    3/4 tsp. garlic powder

    Cut partially frozen meat into 1/4 inch slices being sure to cut with the
    grain for chewy jerky, against the grain for brittle jerky. Combine all
    ingredients and marinate meat in refrigerator overnight. Stir occasionally (I put it in the brine for 8 to 10 hours). Drain in sieve.

    Arrange strips of meat on rack with newspaper underneath for dripping
    juices. Sprinkle black pepper on meat and then place meat in oven until meat is thoroughly dry, at l50 degree convection oven for 6 to 8 hours.)
    This is the first one I try'd and it turned out good. The only thing is I dry'd it a little too long. I'm going to try another bunch, but at an hour less. I dry'd them for 7 hrs @ 160 deg f.....they were still good though.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by stack View Post
    This is the first one I try'd and it turned out good. The only thing is I dry'd it a little too long. I'm going to try another bunch, but at an hour less. I dry'd them for 7 hrs @ 160 deg f.....they were still good though.
    I find when I'm making jerky and curing it in the oven (with door cracked open very slightly) to take it a little before I think it's done because it will continue to dry and harden as it cools.

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    Default Much better!

    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    I find when I'm making jerky and curing it in the oven (with door cracked open very slightly) to take it a little before I think it's done because it will continue to dry and harden as it cools.

    Yes, the second one turned out much better....I remembered the apple juice this time and it did change the taste some. I took it to work, left it sitting on the counter and it was gone in no time%$#! Won't do that again. I used ground buffalo meat and this weekend I'll use strips of Buffalo meat.

    Thanks again.

  9. #9
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    Default Big difference!

    Hi all,
    just cooked my first jerky in the oven, WOW! made a big diff in the taste compared to the dryer. Thinking about getting a smoker and trying it smoked.
    Thanks again for the help.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    I find when I'm making jerky and curing it in the oven (with door cracked open very slightly) to take it a little before I think it's done because it will continue to dry and harden as it cools.
    Why leave the door open a crack?

  11. #11
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    Default Oven door question and recipe:

    I use an all-metal measuring cup of either 1/4 or 1/3 size, to slide between the oven and the oven door, at the top of the side of the door, to only slightly hold the door open. It helps to accelerate the drying process.

    I also set the oven temperature to just -below- 'warm.'
    ---------------------

    Slice 3+ lbs of roast (of your choice) perpendicular to the grain, in 1/4" to 1/2" thicknesses, so that when you take a piece of meat, it is easier than not to pull it into fragments; slicing with the grain, or parallel to the grain, will likely result in outrageously tough jerky that tastes good, but is too frustrating when eating.

    Try to use roasts that lack a lot of sinew/gristle, such as a nice clean eye of round roast, sirloin tip roast, etc; roasts that are likely too tough to want to eat as steaks, but which function just fine as jerky.
    --------------------------------
    In separate bowl, mix:

    1/8 to 1/4 cup brown sugar

    Approximately 1 TBSP (+/-) pickling and canning salt

    1/2 tsp. prague powder

    1-1/2 tsp (either granulated or powdered) onion

    1-1/2 tsp+ freshly ground black or multi-colored pepper corns

    2 tsp granulated garlic or garlic powder

    1 to 2 tsp granular Korean red pepper
    --------------------------------
    Mix dry ingredients, fully integrating them into the brown sugar (it assists in dissolving the powders when you add the liquids..)
    --------------------------------
    Add:

    1/3 cup soy sauce

    Slightly less than 1/3 cup, or 1/3 cup, Worchestershire Sauce
    --------------------------
    Mix brine ingredients thoroughly.
    ---------------------------
    Place sliced meat into either a stainless or glass 2nd bowl, large enough to allow you to stir the meat around, then pour the brine over the meat evenly.
    ---------------------------
    Stir meat around until you're convinced that it's as evenly coated as you can make it.

    Cover bowl and place in refrigerator. Stir several times over the next 24-48 hours, making certain each time you stir the meat and brine to again evenly coat the meat with the remnants of the liquid in the bottom of the bowl.

    After 24-48 hours, place the meat flat (making sure not to over-lap the pieces or have them touching too much, or it slows the process down) on your preferred drying rack, and place in the center of your oven with the heat turned to just below 'warm.'

    Check regularly after about 4-6 hours.

    The thicker the slices of meat (up to 1/2"), the less brittle they'll be when thoroughly dry, and the more chewing pleasure you'll get from them. But thicker meat can take notably longer to dry, too.

    You can also leave just a 'micro-touch' of moisture to them, and you'll eventually perfect your preferred taste as you practice making them..

    -BUT- if you're travelling with this meat, unrefrigerated, in warmer weather, for long periods of time, it's best to dry it thoroughly in order to avoid any possible (though rare) spoilage.

    You can take freeze-dried veggies, various forms of beef or (??) boullion, and dried meat, to make some half-decent to decent soups on the fly, too.

    I usually make 9-10 lbs of meat at a time here when I make jerky, tripling the ingredients for the brine. Even then, managing to have it survive the 'tasting period' of drying, or immediately after, is difficult.

    I've now processed over 12 lbs. of meat into jerky, to add to a frozen care package of corned moose, pepper sticks, moose dogs, etc., for a friend, and I think I need to dry some more jerky again. The trick will be having his insulated box ready before I finish the jerky, so that I can just get it out of here, or he'll be opening up his Christmas some time in April again.

    Over time, you can play with the recipe; try maple syrup instead of the brown sugar. Decrease worchestershire sauce, and increase soy sauce for a better terriyaki flavor. Use other spicing that you prefer in other dishes. Play with it. Etc., etc.

    I know that nitrates aren't good for me, but when I feed the worms, I'm hopefully going smiling, knowing that I ate the food I love, and loved the food I ate.

  12. #12
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stack View Post
    Hi all,
    just cooked my first jerky in the oven, WOW! made a big diff in the taste compared to the dryer. Thinking about getting a smoker and trying it smoked.
    Thanks again for the help.
    Glad you enjoyed it.

    kingfisherktn

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