Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 43

Thread: Back from Kodiak and a successful DB220 hunt!

  1. #1
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Back from Kodiak and a successful DB220 hunt!

    Hey everyone!
    I just got back today from Kodiak. My partner got a really nice Sitka Blacktail and I got a bear. He wasn't huge at all by Kodiak standards (~7 1/2 foot) but he has great fur and is a really pretty. It was a heck of an adventure. I'll post the whole story and some pictures if you are interested. Also, for anyone heading out there: the bears in our area were nocturnal and up really high at the snow line where the deer were. PM me if you have more questions. I'm going to start another thread if anyone is interested.

    Paul

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse View Post
    It was a heck of an adventure. I'll post the whole story and some pictures if you are interested. ....... I'm going to start another thread if anyone is interested.

    Paul
    Congrats!
    And OF COURSE WE"RE INTERESTED!!!
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  3. #3
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,690

    Default Back from Kodiak

    Just what I've been waiting for. Pictures and stories of ANY Kodiak hune. Let's hear it boys>

  4. #4
    Member Roger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sunshine Alaska
    Posts
    2,050

    Default

    Congrads ,Are you going to rug it of full size ?

    Roger
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    903

    Default

    dude thats awesome..Congrats to you both.Looking forward to some man porn pictures soon.

  6. #6
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,408

    Default I can't believe your asking

    YES, we want the full story and pictures to boot....

  7. #7
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Registered Guide, AK
    Posts
    658

    Cool

    Of course we all want to read your story and see the pictures. Congrats on your hunt.

  8. #8
    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska/Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    1,234

    Default

    hunting forum+successful hunt= POST THE DANG PIC'S AND STORY!!!!

  9. #9
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Talking

    I'm calling B.S.! There was no hunt until there are pictures and a storyline!

    Congrat's if I'm wrong.

    Now give us the real deal!

    Taylor

  10. #10
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Sorry for the delay

    Hey everyone,
    Sorry for the delay. I got back and apparently 2 weeks off leads to a huge backlog at work that requires time to catch up on. Who would have guessed? Anyway, at the risk of being long winded, the following 12 posts are my daily journals, transcribed here for your reading pleasure. If you want to skip the boring daily stuff and want to hear only the good parts, I suggest you skip to 28 October and 31 October. I've included everything I wrote and remember in case someone else heading to Kodiak later this month can learn from our success and mistakes and have a great trip themselves. I'm sorry I don't have pictures yet. My hunting partner took all the pictures and he's a very good photographer, so we wants to do a little work on them before I post them, hopefully early next week. I appreciate your patience and I hope you enjoy the reading.

    Paul

  11. #11
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 23 October

    We departed Fairbanks and arrived in Kodiak. It’s nice and a bit breezy. We talked to Andrew Air to confirm our flight for tomorrow because they are getting backed up due to bad weather the past few days. As a result, some people have been slipped later. Luckily for us we are still scheduled for tomorrow and are just slipped 1 hour later. I’m excited and can’t wait to get going. We asked around and found a place called Henry’s for dinner. Steak sounded like a great idea before we speed 2 weeks eating dehydrated Mountain House. Then we called it an early night.

  12. #12
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 24 October

    We are scheduled to go today. We awoke to pretty bad weather with snow and wind. Andrew Air is on weather hold and we will have to just wait and see how the day pans out. We packed a bit more than we expected, so a driver from Andrew Air picked me up and took me out to their hanger so I could unpack everything I shipped and re-organize to make sure we are still ok for weight. I have a Cessna 206 scheduled and we are limited to 750 pounds. We then went to Fish and Game and picked up my DB220 bear tag. When we were done we went to Mack Sports Shop to pick up the fuel I had asked them to hold for me and pick up a license and tags for my hunting partner. The winds were still fairly strong and the high winds have caused the flights for today to slip another day. Since we didn’t have much else to do today we had dinner at Henry’s again and then went back to the hotel for a few beers. We have been rescheduled for tomorrow at 1 p.m. again and hopefully the weather will break for us long enough to get out. I would hate to spend a week in town and not get a lot of hunting time in. I knew weather this time of year could be a factor, so we’ll keep our fingers crossed.

  13. #13
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 25 October

    Another morning waking up in Kodiak to high winds, rain, and snow. We are on weather hold and are still hoping to go this afternoon. As the morning progressed we killed some time at the sporting goods stores and the weather improved. They picked us up at the hotel at 1 p.m. and we headed out to the float plane launch. Stan at Andre Air asked me if I was sure I wanted to be dropped off at Weasel Cove. I told him about my discussions with the guide Mike Munsey and his recommendations for staying in Weasel Cove. Stan told me it was really thick in there with willows recommended we stay on the North side of the bay. I told him I appreciated his advice because having never been there and they are the local experts. Additionally, they had forgotten to pick up my gear from the hanger, so we rushed out there and picked up all our gear and got it back to the launch. Even though we had weighed everything and planned ti down to the pound, expecting to be 740 of our 750 allowed pounds, when they weighed it we were overweight at 806 pounds. I started planning what to leave behind – raft, oars, Mr. Buddy heater when the girl who had been driving us asked Stan if we could take everything because they were going to drop us off in a Beaver anyway and weight would not be a problem. Stan came out and took a quick look and told us we could take everything anyway. Thank God, because I have no clue how we could be that far overweight after all the planning I did, but I’m glad we got to bring everything. We met our pilot Steve Larsen who again recommended that we stay on the north side of Spiridon Bay and not Weasel Cove. I told him that I valued his opinion and that was fine. He said we would look over the area real quick when we got there but really recommended the north side of the bay. It was getting late and the winds were starting to pick up so Steve was anxious to get going before to got too bad or too late. In fact, Steve told Stan, “The weather’s coming. We’ve got to get all of them out of here today before we’re grounded for two days.” I was glad to get going and not slip another day or two. We loaded up and took off in our yellow and red Beaver off on our adventure around 4:30 p.m. As we overflew Spiridon Bay, I could see what Steve was talking about. Weasel Cove was thick with willows and the north side of Spiridon Bay where we finally got dropped off gave us lots of grassy hillsides and ways to get up the hill. It was a much better location.




    We unloaded and bid farewell to Steve who wished us good luck. We moved our gear to a partially sheltered spot near the beach and started setting up camp as it started to rain. We got the food stashed and set up the bear fence in the rain. It was getting dark as we started dinner (with sunset around 6:30 p.m.) as the rain picked up and the wind started howling. We called it an early night since we were planning on being up early the next morning to start the hunt. As the night continued, the weather changed to blowing snow and freezing rain with probably 60 mph winds. The waves were crashing on the beach and the sides of the Cabelas Alaskan Guide tent we were in were bending in so far I thought the poles would break or the tent would get ripped to shreds and we would be soaked for the rest of the trip sleeping under a tarp. Thankfully, the fiberglass poles held, thought I was fairly sleepless through the night as the wind continued to howl.

  14. #14
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 26 October

    We awoke this morning to high winds and rain that kept us in the tent for a while. When the rain finally stopped, the winds continued but at least we could leave the tent. The spot is great. We have a small hill right behind us we can walk up and see the entire mountain sides to the North from the west side of our hunt area all the way to the river. We spent the day glassing the hillsides until dark, looking for any bear parts in the brush or signs of deer. The winds calmed in the afternoon and the tide went out, we walked down the beach close to the water line towards the river to ensure it would wash any scent we left behind away when the tide comes in. We saw lots of trails down to the bay where bears have obviously been coming down to the bay. We checked one out that went into some thick brush and found some deep bones, but no bear tracks. By the evening the sky was clear and the sunset was awesome. The snow from the night before has driven the snow line much lower down the mountains than where it was when we got in. We have been watching and glassing the hillsides all day and by nightfall had still not seen any bears moving or hiding in the bushes.

  15. #15
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 27 October

    This morning started as a very cold, clear, gorgeous day. We got dressed and hiked up a hill west of our camp to get closer to the hills and see if we can look into the valley behind the small hills close to our camp. As we were moving to our new spotting point we startled something in the tall grass and I’m pretty sure it was a snowshoe hare. We still haven’t seen any sign of bears on the hillsides yet. My hunting partner though he saw a deer up high in the hills but it moved before he could be sure. If nothing else, at least there is some sort of animal moving up there which is hopeful. As we continued to glass from our new spotting point we could he could hear some footsteps in the woods near us, and we couldn’t’ make out what it might be, but id didn’t sound very big. We stayed at the new point until mid-day when we decided to head back to camp to put together our plan for tomorrow. No sooner had we gotten back to our glassing spot at camp before I spotted two does high on the hillside. They came and went out of the same area on the hillside for the rest of the day. They would come out of the brush to feed in the tall grass on the hillside then return into the brush for a while. They repeated that several times. They were pretty high, just below the snow line on the hillsides. On a whim I climbed to the top of our small spotting knob to look at the other side of the bay and spotted a bear on the beach in Weasel Cove. Oh well, I’m sure he wouldn’t have showed if we had camped there and he looked pretty small. As evening approached and the tide went out, we walked down the beach again to see if anything else might come out near the river in the delta as dusk approached. We continued to watch the hillsides and didn’t spot anything else. The plan for tomorrow will be to climb high into the hills early in the morning to try to be there before sunrise. Hopefully since we saw some does up there we will find a few deer and put some meat into the freezer for the winter. If we get a deer or two, maybe a bear will follow. If not, we’ll try to work the river the following day.

  16. #16
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 28 October

    What a night! 2 hours after we went to sleep a bear came in and checked out our camp. I could hear it come crashing down the hillsides far away from camp. I crossed the other beach near the stream we have been getting water from and circled in front of the tent. It would come in close to the front of the tent, then dashed back into the marsh further in front of the tent. It then crossed back across the marsh and around the small hill in front of the tent even closer to the tent. Then it went down to the marsh and across to the other beach on our left and came up the hill all the way to the hot box for the bear fence. I suspect it touched the fence because I could hear it walking through the grass with it’s heavy footsteps and could hear it huffing and breathing. As soon as it got to the hot box it bolted back down the hill to the beach and up the hill on that side. Through all this I tried to quietly, and then more aggressively wake my hunting partner up. When the bear finally left at 9:53 p.m. he woke up and I told him we just had a bear check out our camp. He replied, “Neat… I have to pee…” and went right back to snoring. It took me about an hour to relax and get back to sleep. I had a fairly sleepless night for the rest of the night waiting for the bear to come back. As a result, we got a later start in the morning than planned.




    Once we got dressed and ready to go, we hiked up to one of the high hills near where we saw the deer yesterday. It was one heck of a hike. Like all of Alaska, it looked close, but it took us over 2 hours through thick willows, alders, and thorns on steep hillsides to get 0.39 miles as the crow flies. We got to the top of the hill only to find another higher hill beyond it. We decided to split up. My hunting partner would go up the next hill to look for deer and I would go to the right side of the current hill to use the open grassy side to look towards the river and glass for bears since it gave us a much higher vantage point and a view of hillsides we couldn’t see from camp. We agreed that if he shot I would come to him and if I saw something and shot he would come to me. If nothing else we set up a rally point to meet at before sunset to head back down together. No sooner had I gotten to the hillside and set up to start glassing the area when I heard the familiar report of my Marlin 45/70 I had loaned to my hunting partner. About 20 seconds later I heard a second shot. I packed everything back up and headed towards the shots. I got to the rally point and heard my partner call, “Paul, are you there? I got a buck!” I gathered up all my gear and paralleled him around the hill and eventually climbed up to him. We got to where he shot from and looked down at the really nice Sitka Blacktail Deer he shot. He told me how he got up there, dropped his pack, looked up and saw the deer down in the valley looking up at him only 30 yards away. He was so excited he had to relax a minute he was shaking with excitement so much he couldn’t aim. He’s a very good marksman, so it didn’t take long for him to go back to basics and if nothing else time his shot to match when his shake put the sights on the deer’s vitals. We sent out our “Help –We’ve had some luck and got something” message on our SPOT. We hiked down to it and took the mandatory hero shots before he started cleaning. It was his first big game animal, so I talked him through it and showed him a little while I stood watch on the small hill for bears. I was really excited for him and his excitement was contagious. There was nothing that was going to take the smile off his face for the rest of the trip. There were some fairly large bear tracks through the valley so I wanted to be sure someone was on the lookout in case a bear showed up. We traded off after a while and I finished cleaning the deer for him so we could get started down the hill.




    This is where we made the next critical error. From our spotting knob it looked like it would be much easier trip back to camp if we just followed down the valley to our west all the way to the creek that runs next to our camp. We started down that route, with me in front carrying our packs and the 45/70 in case we ran into anything attracted to the deer my partner carried. We stuck close together and soon found we were going through lots of thick willows and alders. The trip was significantly more difficult than we thought and worse than any of the trips we took before. We started late in the evening and it wound up taking us over 3 hours as it turned from dusk into night. The last hour was a slug through marsh as light was fading. With a lot of will power and effort we made it to within sight of the camp 300 feet away when I stepped on what I though was ground, and turned out to be ice covered in leaves. IT broke, sending me into the cold water up to my knees and drenching both my boots. Fortunately we were close to camp and I had brought a Mr. Buddy heater to dry things out, just in case. We got to camp and I changed into dry pants and my hip waders so we could hang the meat from a tree, grab some dinner, and called it a night. As a precaution, we put all our bloody clothes into a game bag and hung it along with my pack frame with the meat to keep all those smells away from camp and out tent. Thankfully, the Mr. Buddy worked well to dry boots out, and warm the tent a little as well.

  17. #17
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 29 October

    What another exciting night we had. We got into camp around 8 p.m. and went to sleep at 11 p.m. Not an hour later and midnight, the bear returned. We could hear it come crashing down the hill again and towards the back of the tent, but it ran away at the sound of us opening our sleeping bags. It apparently wasn’t scared very much because it returned 40 minutes later from across the marsh to the front of the tent. It ran again at the sound of the sleeping bags opening, only to return again 20 minutes later. After it ran again, we were fairly concerned. We were worried that it was getting too bold and though it might not stop the next time and come fully into camp. So, we got up, got dressed, and went out with our rifles behind the tent and decided to wait and watch to see if it showed up again. We waited until 4 a.m. and the bear never returned. Being tired, we went to sleep and decided that today would be a rest and recovery day from the previous day’s hike through the brush and late night with the bear coming around camp. We got up after some sleep and glassed the hills from camp. I was hoping, since we could see the hills around the site of yesterday’s deer kill, the we might see a bear coming or going from the gut pile and watch where it goes. I looked around camp and found some tracks from the bear on the beach and near the marsh, and it looks like he’s probably around 7 feet or so. I know that a cub checking out camp would be really bad but, based on the tracks and the weight of his steps, I think this bear is a little bit bigger than that. We also put together a plan for tonight. I figure the bear could see us outside the tent last night, so tonight we’ll sit inside the vestibule facing the hills and marsh where the tent can hide our silhouettes. Thought the weather is beautiful, we didn’t see any signs of bears today on the hillsides. That’s fairly disappointing since I know there has to be a bear up there interested in the gut pile. I did see several eagles on the hillside near the gut pile so I suspect they may have been watching a bear in the valley on the gut pile, but we weren’t going to hike up there just on speculation. Based on the past few nights and not seeing any bears on the beaches of hillsides, I’m beginning to think that the bears are turning nocturnal this time of year. That will definitely make the last few days hunting more difficult. I had hoped to catch a bear at first or last light moving so we would have a better idea where they are, but no such luck yet. We had dinner and set up for our night “stakeout” to watch for the bear in case he shows up again tonight. We stayed up until midnight with no real signs of the bear. We went to bed but stayed dressed in case he shows up later.

  18. #18
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 30 October

    No signs of the bear after we went to sleep last night. We heard a few pops in the woods really far away, but nothing else. We got up fairly early and started up the hill to check out the gut pile area. We took a different route up the hill this time (I know, we weren’t containing our scent to one trail, but we were pretty close to where we went the last time) that turned out to be much easier and only took us about 45 minutes to get up to our spotting knob. When we got there we approached the spot quietly with the wind in our face, hoping to see some signs of bear. We got into place and checked out the area with our binoculars and didn’t see any signs of movement. My hunting partner set up where he could see the entire valley in case something approached and I worked down our path on the side of the hill to where the gut pile was. When I got to the spot there wasn’t a single scrap left. Not even the smallest piece of fur that we trimmed off was left. The only evidence there had been a gut pile was a blood spot on the grass and that’s it. There weren’t any signs the carcass was dragged off, but based on the huge tracks and drops of blood I saw in the snow I assume a huge bear picked up the whole thing and carried it off. The tracks were like someone took a 10x10 square post and stamped it in the snow, with huge toes in front of it and very long claws. I went back up to the top of the hill to watch the hillsides and the valley in the direction of the tracks to see if that huge bear returned or was somewhere nearby.




    After watching the hillsides for a few hours, several deer came out from hiding like that hay days before, around 2 p.m. There were 5 of them that came out of the brush about ¾ of a mile to our left even higher on the hillside and 3 does came out on the steep hillside 200 yards to our right. The does didn’t present a good angle for a shot because they were on a steep hillside across a steep ravine from us. I talked to my partner about how you choose to shoot not because you can, but also because you have selected the animal you want, can guaranteed a quick and humane kill, and your ability to successfully recover the animal. Those does didn’t give us good options for any of that. I also didn’t want to shoot because they were acting skittish and were staring into the draw to our right, which was exactly where the huge tracks that took the deer carcass off to led. I was hoping the bear was down in that draw in the thick brush and would either present himself for a second or might be heading our way, with the wind still in our favor. I was hoping the bear moved because the does skirted up the hill and over the ridge where we could no longer see them. We waited but there was no sight of the bear and ti started to rain. We sat through several rain shower and increasing wind and didn’t see anything else. We decided to head down the hill early because the increasing wind and rain looked and sounded like a huge storm was approaching like our first night in camp. We knew nothing would be out in a storm like that and the trip back down the steep and slippery hill would only be worse in a pouring rain and wind storm. We guessed wrong because just as we got back to camp it cleared up. We had dinner and set up for another stakeout in case the bear returns to camp again.




    We sat in the vestibule of the tent to hide our silhouettes yet again and wait for the bear. We heard a few cracks in the woods far away but nothing else. The most remarkable thing was a huge red fox came right up to us in the middle of the night. We walked under the bear fence and ducked behind a tree when we turned a headlamp on to see what the little creature was that was coming up to us. He peeked out from behind the tree. He then walked right in front of the tent, 5 feet away from us, and just stopped and stared at us. He was big and fat and we debated shooting him for a minute because of his size and really nice pelt (2 fox limit in Unit 8 in season at the time). We decided to let him be and just watch him. I’m sure we was thinking we were a couple of idiots sitting in front of a tent with nothing around. He finally ran off when I got up and shooed him away. We called it a night and went to sleep for the rest of the uneventful night.

  19. #19
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 31 October

    Up early today so we can get up the hill before sunrise to our favorite spotting knob. We’ve decided to stick with that spot because we’ve seen deer, got a deer, and seen the only fresh bear tracks other than the ones next to camp. Today is overcast but a really nice day, and one of the warmer ones we’ve had this trip. We got to our spot via the same route as yesterday and got there even quicker this time. We have found a route up and back that works well for us now. It turned out to be a very quiet day for glassing. We spotted only 1 deer over a mile away to our left and higher up the hillside. It only came out of the brush for a short time before it disappeared back into the brush, never to reappear for the rest of the day. I am beginning to think with only today and tomorrow left to hunt that we aren’t going to get or see anything else. We saw another Andre Air plane circle the bay and land, dropping off another hunter a few bays farther to the west of it. It’s the first sight of another person in our area sice we’ve been here. So far at least my dream Alaska hunt away from everyone else has been a reality. It has been really great enjoying the peace and quiet out here. As it got late into the afternoon we were getting down and disappointed about the lack of bear sightings this trip so far and started formulating plans to work the river mouth tomorrow.




    Then, my partner stood up and brought his rifle to the ready. I couldn’t see what he saw from my spot and asked him what he had, assuming he was getting ready to take another deer (I had promised him we’d try to get him some deer on this trip). His reply was, “Bear” which got my adrenaline rushing. Two bears came busting out of the brush at the bottom of the hill we were on, only 20 yards away. The front bear was smaller and was being chased by a larger bear. The small bear continued running through the valley to the right and the larger bear paused, and turned away from us towards where the gut pile had been. I assume that he smelled the blood in the grass since the wind was coming down the hill in our face, and it was all the time we needed to get a shot. After the first shot my partner shot again and the bear turned and ran into the brush right below us where we couldn’t’ see him. I ran left along the ridge line to where my partner had shot his deer from and could see the bear. He was at the base of the hill and he looked right up at me and growled, showing me his teeth! All I could see what his massive head looking up at me and my first thought was, “Good Lord, he’s Huge, and he’s pissed!” He turned around and started back into the brush to the left in the valley and I put a shot through his back between the shoulders that I hoped would also take out his far shoulder based on his body and leg position. We later found that shot passed through his lungs and out his chest. It still didn’t stop him and he started heading into the thicker brush, offering me another shot at the vitals almost broadside, slightly quartering away. That fourth shot finally took him to the ground. My partner by now had also moved forward from his shooting spot and yelled, “He’s still moving.” I still had the scope on him and could see him rolling and starting to get up and put another shot into his chest. (I have been told by everyone to shoot, and keep shooting until a bear stops moving, and we weren’t going to lose this bear). He growled and looked back up at me again as I put another shot into him. I heard his head hit the ground and his final death growl and he stopped moving. Still, we kept the rifles on him and watched for any sign of movement as my partner walked down the ridge line to me. The adrenaline was rushing and we were both starting to shake from the rush. I couldn’t see the entire bear, just part of his body between his front and real legs through the brush. We took turns watching him for the next 30 minutes to make sure he was dead while we stripped off a few layers and got ready for the task ahead. We sent out our “Help –We’ve had some luck and got something” message on our SPOT, but I also couldn’t wait and called my wife on the SAT phone and left her messages on our home and her cell phone, since I knew she was at a Halloween party with our daughter. It was amazing it took us 4 shots from the .338 Win Mag and 2 shots from the 45/70 to get that bear down. Everything people told be about them being tough animals was right. During our wait my partner said several times, “I hope it’s a good bear.” I told him not to worry about it, after 3 ½ years of bear hunting in AK with no luck, that a bear with a coat that nice and that size was perfect. I can’t begin to explain my excitement, elation, joy, pride, and happiness I felt at that moment. It was a dream hunt coming to fruition with a great friend. I can’t imagine anything better.




    We shot the bear at 3:23 p.m. and and 3:50 we climbed down the hill to check him out. My partner covered me from a different angle while I approached the bear from behind to be sure it was dead. He was truly beautiful with thick, dark brown hair with blond tips and white crowns on his ears. He wasn’t the 9-10 foot Kodiak you always read about,(he later squared roughly 7’ 6” with a 23 5/8 skull) but he was huge to me and the perfect bear. I had always told people I would rather have a smaller bear with great character than a huge plain brown one. Even so, I was just glad for the blessing of being able to find such a magnificent animal.




    We got to work skinning and finished right a sunset. I got the hide packed up and climbed up the steep hill back to our spotting point. We debated building a fire and spending the night up on the hill because it was almost completely dark. We decided not to, partly because it looked like it was going to rain, and partly because we knew there was a small bear and much larger bear in that area somewhere. Thank God for a good GPS and headlamp. We decided that since the packs were really heavy and the hillsides steep and slippery, we would drag our bags down the steep parts so we wouldn’t risk slipping and breaking a leg or something at night in the wilderness. We both are fairly good in the woods, and our memories of the path made it easier to recognize certain trees and paths in the dark as the GPS guided us towards camp. The trip was arduous, with overcast skies, no moonlight, and only our headlamps to light the way. We made enough noise that I wasn’t too worried about us startling something, but we kept rifles and pistols at the ready anyway. We did follow the easy path home we had used in the day, but it still took us 3 hours to get back to camp as it started raining. We made it back safe, exhausted, and rewarded. We celebrated the hunt by splitting a small flask of single malt and a cigar, and turned off the alarms for tomorrow morning. After a quick dinner, we settled down for a good night’s sleep.

  20. #20
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Trip Log - 1 November

    We awoke this morning to a rainy day. We’ve been blessed with good weather for most of this trip, so a little rain today is long overdue. I spent most of the day in the vestibule of the tent skinning out the head and paws and fleshing the hide. We didn’t have much else to do, but working in the vestibule, sitting on a small action packer and working on an upside down bucket is making it take a lot longer that usual. When it finally stopped raining we spread out the hide which made finishing up the fleshing go much faster and easier. We did a quick rough measurement of the hide (roughly 7 feet 6 inches) and then salted and rolled it up and set it to start draining. It’s been cold enough that I’m not worried about the hide spoiling or slipping in the field, but I know when we leave I’ve got a night in a warm hotel room ahead and then will check the hide with Alaska Air so I wanted to salt it to make sure I can get it to my taxidermist ok. We called Andrew Air on the SAT phone and confirmed pickup for tomorrow.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •