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Thread: .325wsm update - 3 dead critters

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up .325wsm update - 3 dead critters

    Well, as many of you know the wsm debate rages on. Many say it's all hype. I really don't care. But, for those of you who are considering buying a .325wsm here is my experience with a Kimber Montana with a Leupold VXIII 2.5-8x36. I wanted to replace my wood stock Ruger 06 with a light weight, all weather, all around caliber with more punch than my 06. So I bought the 325 Montana. I'm shooting 200 grain Accubonds. 1 inch groups at 100 yds. 3-4 inches at 200. Best I can shoot anything.

    12 day, 50 mile walkin sheep hunt. Nice to carry a 7lb 2oz rifle. Lots of rain, mud, brush busting etc.

    Aug 12th. I killed a Dall sheep with it at about 350+ yds. Shot up hill, hit him low. High in the lower leg up through the brisket and blowing out the far shoulder.

    Aug 14th. My partner killed his Dall sheep with it also after his gun jambed. Double lunged him at 200 yds. Poked a nice hole right on through. Broke a rib going in and out.

    4 Wheeler Moose hunt. The Yamaha Griz didn't mind the 7lb 2 oz rifle either
    Sept. 9th. I shot a 40 inch Moose at about 350 yds. Hit him in the hump. Shattered his spine and dropped him. Recovered the bullet under the hide. Perfect mushroom. If I can find a scale I'll wiegh it.

    So far so good. Don't beleive the anti-wsm hype. They kill critters as dead as any other calber.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  2. #2

    Default hype or not hype

    I, for one, don't doubt that the 325WSM probably works just fine. I also can understand the continual search for "other" cartridges to use for same purposes. I also see that the major companies must continually one up the others to keep in business, furnish new fads for bored gun zooters to enjoy. I will admit that I am old enough to have seen many "new" cartridges come and then go dry, so to speak. But, like a few other old dino's, I also know that there are no limit to the "standard" cartridges that have been around a long time that would have performed just as well, including your 06. But, it's all a matter of enjoying your past-time, so keep on keepin on, Bro'.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Ya it's fun to have something new and different. It's great that we have so many options to choose from, we can all find the right gun/caliber combo (or 2 or 3 or...) that we want that works. I would not have felt confident in the 06 on that moose at that range. Some guys might. I passed up shots at two bulls last year because of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    I, for one, don't doubt that the 325WSM probably works just fine. I also can understand the continual search for "other" cartridges to use for same purposes. I also see that the major companies must continually one up the others to keep in business, furnish new fads for bored gun zooters to enjoy. I will admit that I am old enough to have seen many "new" cartridges come and then go dry, so to speak. But, like a few other old dino's, I also know that there are no limit to the "standard" cartridges that have been around a long time that would have performed just as well, including your 06. But, it's all a matter of enjoying your past-time, so keep on keepin on, Bro'.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  4. #4

    Default Shooting at distance

    I know that it isn't always possible, though I think it is more possible then is told, to get close enough to an animal so that the ability to take a solid shot is enhanced, including by having as much velocity/energy as possible to do the deed. I was brought up thinking that a very real part of hunting was the ability to get as close as possible to an animal for that reason, which was often a challenge, but that is a good thing, right? Today, we have cartridges and optics capable of nailing a full size game animal at 400 yards or more, but the further the distance, the more likely a small amount of error is highly magnified. I. for one, like to be sure of my shot, to make a clean kill, which I have always been fortunate enough to do. A moose is a lot of animal to bring down with assurance, and I think one that deserves to be taken cleanly. I am not attacking anyone's ability to make clean long shots, only the ability and practicality to get close and make it more definite.

  5. #5
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    Default 325 Wsm

    Is anyone loading for this? I'm having a problem locating any information to work up a good load. Any help will be appreciated.

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  7. #7
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    Thumbs up

    Yup. I agree. I grew up hunting in western Montana. In the mountains shooting from one ridge to another at 2-3 even 400 yds is quite common. As well as 100yds or less while still hunting for whitetails (my favorite). Hunting in the high country for these moose can be challenging. When a 200-300+ yd shot presents itself I want to be ready. However, I love the thrill of a good stalk also and always try to get as close as I can. Just so happened that this year the bull was on the move. I was able to close the gap by about 150 yds to get within range. I took the only shot I had. Would still like to call one in and try and get him with the 44mag though. Maybe next year.

    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    I know that it isn't always possible, though I think it is more possible then is told, to get close enough to an animal so that the ability to take a solid shot is enhanced, including by having as much velocity/energy as possible to do the deed. I was brought up thinking that a very real part of hunting was the ability to get as close as possible to an animal for that reason, which was often a challenge, but that is a good thing, right? Today, we have cartridges and optics capable of nailing a full size game animal at 400 yards or more, but the further the distance, the more likely a small amount of error is highly magnified. I. for one, like to be sure of my shot, to make a clean kill, which I have always been fortunate enough to do. A moose is a lot of animal to bring down with assurance, and I think one that deserves to be taken cleanly. I am not attacking anyone's ability to make clean long shots, only the ability and practicality to get close and make it more definite.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  8. #8
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    Default 325 WSM Loads

    TMA,

    I settled on the 200 grain Nosler Partition, FED 215 primers and 64.0 grains of H4350, all neatly stacked in new Winchester brass. This would be about max. I used this in two different Kimber Montana rifles and the Kimbers loved it. I'll have to check my notebook but I think velocity was 2850+ fps.

    This would be my favorite WSM, well next to my 338 or 375 or 416 on that case. I am developing data for those for a local rifle maker.

    Good luck with the loads.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TMA View Post
    Is anyone loading for this? I'm having a problem locating any information to work up a good load. Any help will be appreciated.
    TMA,
    My most recent loading is for the .325 wsm in a kimber montana.
    I used : Powder: 65.5 gr Hogdons 4350
    Primer : WLRM
    BULLET: Barnes TSX 200 gr
    Winchester: Brass once fired

    I got up to 66gr without pressure signs but backed off to 65.5 as I was getting 2862 fps with 65.5 and that was about max load velocity for barnes original x bullet. I'm getting 1 1/4" at 100 yd. I'm .050 off lands and will move slightly tighter to improve group next step.
    goldbelt

  10. #10
    Member GreginAlaska's Avatar
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    Default

    I was in a gunstore recently and was told the following by a guy working there, he said he was told this by an ammo rep. (ya hearsay) Anyways, the guy said if you took a 200 something grain bullet (can't remember the exact number) in a 338 winchester magnum, it would take 32 psi of chamber pressure for every foot pound of energy at the muzzle of a 24 inch barrel. He said if you put the same weight bullet in a 325 WSM it only takes 17 psi of chamber pressure per foot pound of energy at the muzzle. He said this equals a lot less recoil for the same energy. Is this possible?

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