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Thread: Wiggy's

  1. #1
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    Question Wiggy's

    Need recommendations for a wiggy's sleeping bag for a moose float in Sept. What is the best model to buy.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Where are you hunting? I have a sleep system and it covers me year round.

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    Brooks Range

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Temp ranges

    For what it's worth, I use two different temp ratings on bags during September. Up until about the middle of the month I can get by with a +20 degree bag, but after that I pull out all the stops and go with my -40. It's overkill I know, but once in a while we get early freeze and I'm grateful for the extra warmth.

    So I guess my point is that it depends on what part of September we're talking about.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  5. #5
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    I will be hunting middle to end of Sept.

  6. #6
    Member jeff p's Avatar
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    Default bags

    I used a Wiggys -20 bag this past Sept. I think the lowest temps I encountered were in the 8 deg range. I slept well with it although I did wear a jacket & hat. I know I wouldnt have wanted any less bag. Some years its warm some it isnt, sometimes it changes both ways during your outings. Just hit up Marc Taylor he wont steer you wrong.

  7. #7
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Default ditto what these guys said, and...

    The nice thing about the heavier bag is that it is thicker, with extra loft that makes your back more comfortable. With that said I used a 20 degree bag with the overbag system on my Haul Road hunt at the end of September. We slept on the snow and I was toasty warm without any extra clothes at night.

    Everyone can crow about their peanut-sized sleeping bags for mountaineering and that's fine. My recommendation for the Wiggy bag is that they keep you warm, work well when wet (I've tried that one, unfortunately), and are comfortable. Go jump inside one for about five minutes--you'll be smokin' hot in the showroom!

    Putting these bags in the compression sack left me ample room inside of my Barney's pack. You ain't gonna carry the whole animal out in one shot anyways...not that it matters on a float trip, I guess.

    Cheers!

    IceKing02

  8. #8

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    For hunting in September I use a Wiggy's Ultra-light that is good to 20 degree's, actually, that's the only bag I use but I don't do much camping in the winter. I would recommend the Super light which is good to 0 degree's. Also, I would suggest that you sleep in some sort of long john type clothing, like a poly pro setup or similar, it will prevent you from sticking to the inside of the bag.

  9. #9
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default fill type?

    What is the barney's filled with?

  10. #10

    Default barneys

    Typically a Barney's is filled with hunting gear. He was referring to his pack.


    I like Wiggys as well, the FTRSS has been good to me. Call Marc Taylor at Wiggy's Alaska.

  11. #11
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Default

    I've got a north face Goliath and froze my ass off out in Eureka over an early cold snap not too long ago, it's rated to 0* but I may have to step up and get another bag, if so I'm goin Wiggy's -40. Gets old having to wear poly's and a layer of fleece to bed and unfortunately I don't carry much fat.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Default Sleep comfortable

    I own the Wiggy's " Antartica " . Like Michael Strahan mentions , " It's over kill but sometimes the extra warmth is needed . The warmer the bag the more cushion you get . Thats the way I go .

  13. #13
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    Default Sleep comfortable

    The Wiggy's Antarica is rated for - 60 degree's .

  14. #14
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default sorry

    I meant what is the wiggy bag filled with?

  15. #15
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Lamilite.

    Shoot Marc Taylor a pm, he's the Wiggy go to guy here in AK.

    http://wiggys.com/lamilite.cfm?
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  16. #16
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    Default fill

    Wiggy's has lamilite insulation

  17. #17
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    Default Wiggy sale

    Check out Wiggy's web sight . I see there is a sale on sleeping bags

  18. #18
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Lamilite

    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I meant what is the wiggy bag filled with?
    I believe Lamilite is a trade name Wiggy's came up with a few years ago. It describes not just the fiber itself (I think the fiber is first generation Polargard?), but it also describes how it is assembled in the bag. Essentially the fibers are melted on one side, so it all hangs together in one batt, in contrast with other bags that use blown-in short fibers that tend to clump and create cold spots.

    Other companies have adopted different methods to avoid creating cold spots, such as shingling, continuous fiber, etc, but results have been mixed.

    A side note- Wiggy's has a very loyal following, and it is somewhat rare to find someone who has used one of their bags, who does not like it. I do not own one, primarily because I'm not in the market (I'm using North Face and Caribou Mountaineering). Perhaps I will try one out when I need to consider another bag, as I'm hearing a lot of good things. That said, my North Face bag ended up getting completely soaked through this fall, and I was really worried about being cold. But as soon as I got in the bag, my body heat warmed up the water in it, and I was as warm as ever. By the end of the second night, my body heat had gotten the bag completely dry! I never had that experience with a bag before, and I suspect it would be the case with just about any synthetic-fill bag.

    I agree with the others; call Marc Taylor. He knows the Wiggy's line well and can discuss this with you in more detail.

    A couple of other factors to consider- the physical weight of the bag compared to its insulating value, and the fact that temperature ratings are a challenge to figure out. There are no objective standards to rate temperature ranges for bags, so manufacturers come up with their own ratings. For that reason, you may be cold in one company's -20 bag, and too hot in someone else's 0-degree bag. This is further complicated by the fact that some of us sleep warmer than others, just because of our physiology. The only way to really know for sure is to try it. Unfortunately, unless you are borrowing one from a friend, you have to purchase it to try it out. Does anyone offer returns if the bag is not warm enough?

    Finally, whatever you do, test-fit your bag before you take it afield! I had a hunter who borrowed a bag for a Dall sheep hunt, and never got in it before coming to Alaska! On the first night, he discovered that his shoulders were too broad to fit in the bag, and he spent every night with the bag zipped up halfway, and all his spare clothes on his upper body. He was miserable.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  19. #19
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Sleep system...like Lujon

    Still waiting for Lujon to hear more, but a layering approach can add flexibility to your sleeping bag.

    For "tween seasons" - one approach...
    1. Take a lighter bag. Both my bags have a hood, which is invaluable.
    2. Pack a lightweight bivy sack, liner and layered clothing like long johns (which also keep body oils from degrading the insulation material) as mentioned above

    The bivy sack adds maybe 10degrees, the liner maybe 5 plus layered clothing has worked well for me in seasons when it might be warm (40) or might be pretty cold (20).

    Good luck.

  20. #20
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default down

    I have a down bag rated at zero - but it weighs almost nothing - if it gets wet it will kill me if it is cold. I have a cabelas bag that is holofill or something similiar - it is a -20 bag and if it gets wet I will be cold, but probably still alive.

    In my tipi I never get wet and I have a wood stove to dry out all of my clothing....probably won't be sheep hunting with the tipi though.

    When I hunt with my wife we put our two down bags together and that adds another level of warmth to the bags and sometimes add our poly's and a hat if it is really cold.

    My sheep hunting for next year will consist of 3-4 day hunts - and we will be moving a lot, keeping pack weights to a minimum will be very important. When bivy hunting we have always use a silnylon tarp - but that is in the rocky mountains - not alaska. sometimes the weather was not so nice - with single digit temps with snow and rain and sleet in a 2-3 day period many times while elk hunting at 10K+ feet.

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