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Thread: 300 RUM or 338RUM

  1. #1

    Default 300 RUM or 338RUM

    i was looking into buying a new rifle. i have narrowed my search down to 2 calibers. 300 rum or 338 rum. my intentions are for moose/ caribou with a possibility of mtn. goat. i was leaning toward the 300 and i have shot 300 rum and a 338 win mag but i am not sure about the recoil on 338rum. any oppinions on the matter?

  2. #2
    Member shirtr's Avatar
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    Can't see the 338 rum being any worse than the 300 rum since the case is smaller. Either calibre will more than take the game you talk of. There are great bullet selections in both calibres as well.

  3. #3
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Not to put ideas in your head but the 338 Rum kicks much higher than the 300 RUM. Nothing a break cant fix but it is noticably more recoil, IMHO.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  4. #4
    Member shirtr's Avatar
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    I think that the only way it will be worse than the 300 RUM is if you are going to shoot the 250-300g bullets out of it. If you go the 338 route you may want to build yourself a 338 EDGE and really get the ballistics to work for you with the heavier bullet weights.
    My $0.02

  5. #5

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    I think the RUMs are great cartridges but the only reason I would get a RUM would be for long range shooting and hunting or hunting big bears. A 300 WSM or WM can take any of those animals cleanly out to 600-700 yds, even a little farther. And the ammo or reloading will be cheaper also, with a lot more variety factory ammo. Also less kick and no brake required.

    The 338 EDGE is also a great cartridge but only boasts about another 100 fps over the 338 RUM and you must reload and form your brass. I'v'e never fired either, but they both kick harder than mules.

    If you want to know more about these cartrdges from a lot of guys who shoot them, check out the Long Range Hunting forum. Thee is a ton of info there about them.

    Also, if your looking at the 338 you might check out the Lapua, it's very to close to the RUM ballistically and you will get better brass.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    I think the RUMs are great cartridges but the only reason I would get a RUM would be for long range shooting and hunting or hunting big bears. A 300 WSM or WM can take any of those animals cleanly out to 600-700 yds, even a little farther. And the ammo or reloading will be cheaper also, with a lot more variety factory ammo. Also less kick and no brake required.

    The 338 EDGE is also a great cartridge but only boasts about another 100 fps over the 338 RUM and you must reload and form your brass. I'v'e never fired either, but they both kick harder than mules.

    If you want to know more about these cartrdges from a lot of guys who shoot them, check out the Long Range Hunting forum. Thee is a ton of info there about them.

    Also, if your looking at the 338 you might check out the Lapua, it's very to close to the RUM ballistically and you will get better brass.

    There is no case froming to d with the 338 Edge. The 338 Edge is a 300 RUM necked up with no other changes. Simple run the 300 RUM case through a 338 Edge sizing die and the neck expander with expand the neck to 338 diameter and you no have a 338 Edge

  7. #7

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    ok so what is the 338 edge. i have never heard of it. i also thought the 338 rum was a necked up 300 rum case so what is the differrence? i do not reload so custom handloads are out of the question for now. i am looking for facts or oppinions on the 2 RUMs to help make my decision easier.

  8. #8
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    338 edge is a necked up 300 RUM. The 338 RUM has a shorter case than the 300 RUM so less case capacity. I have a 338 RUM & yes it kicks w/out the brake but w/ the brake I can shoot it all day. I am a smaller guy 5'7" 160 lbs so I believe anyone can shoot it if your not recoil sensitive. I have harvested moose from 25 yards to 460 yards, & helped put a brown bear down @ 385 yards. The bear was big, 9'7'' sqaured. The amount of energy is quit frankly awesome & the balistics of the round is superior to just about any other round out there. The round is capable of doing things that most average shooters don't have the skill for, but w/ practice it can become VERY lethal. I hand load my rounds to my gun so I get great accurracy & good FPS. With the selection of good bullets out there from 160 to 300 grains it is a perfect all around rifle in my opinion.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwp500 View Post
    There is no case froming to d with the 338 Edge. The 338 Edge is a 300 RUM necked up with no other changes. Simple run the 300 RUM case through a 338 Edge sizing die and the neck expander with expand the neck to 338 diameter and you no have a 338 Edge
    That's what I meant by forming, I should have said necking up.

  10. #10
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    I own a .338 Edge, built off a Remington 700. I bought it because I got a great deal on the rifle, and I keep it because it's fun to shoot. Mine has a muzzle break on it, so it's pretty comfortable to shoot. The break is not something I want to carry into the field, however, it's obnoxiously loud.

    If I was starting from scratch, though, I would just buy a plain-jane .338 RUM. I don't think the extra .100" case length is worth the added gunsmithing expenses and fooling around to build an Edge. A guy would be better off spending $400 on a McMillan stock for the factory .338 Ultra, and then you'd really have an outstanding rifle package.

    Another plus to the vanilla .338 RUM chambering, over the .338 Edge, is that you get a little more wiggle room in the mag box to play with bullet seating depths. Something to think about.

    I feel the same about the .338 Lapua chambering, by the way. A Lapua is just an even more expensive route to get .338 Ultra performance....give or take.




    Not to add a fly in the ointment, but a serious drawback to any of the Ultra Mags, in my opinion, is their long barrel lengths. Most use 26" barrels, or longer. A long barrel does not make for a very handy rifle for much of Alaska's hunting situations. Sure, you could chop the barrel, but then your "Ultra" performance suffers. Then, you might as well get a .300 or .338 Win mag and save some money on ammo/reloading components.

    For a powerful, tidy hunting rifle, the .375 H&H shines. It performs well in a 20" barrel and transports nicely through thick alders. Ammo and brass are readily available, and usually cheaper than the various RUM offerings. A .375 H&H shoots fairly flat to 300 yards, and as a bonus, the recoil of a .375 H&H isn't nearly as sharp as the RUM chamberings....not to my shoulder anyway.

    No matter what you decide, have fun with your new rifle. Planning and exploring various options is all part of the fun.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by linger27 View Post
    ok so what is the 338 edge. i have never heard of it. i also thought the 338 rum was a necked up 300 rum case so what is the differrence? i do not reload so custom handloads are out of the question for now. i am looking for facts or oppinions on the 2 RUMs to help make my decision easier.
    The 338 EDGE is a wildcat (as already mentioned a necked up 300 RUM case) and you'll need to handload for it. The 300 RUM and 338 RUM are somewhat proprietary cartridges produced by Remmington. As far as I know, Remmington is the only manufacturer that make the rifles but Federal also makes ammo for them. Winchester doesn't... go figure.

    As for which to choose between the two, I have done a lot of thought on it myself and decided I would go with the 300 RUM. But... I would definitly handload for it and probably opt for the 200 gr AB, which I don't believe you can get off the shelf. Still, the off the shelf bullet selection is a little better for the 300. The 300 RUM can do almost anything a 338 RUM can do with a little smaller bullet. If I was hunting big bears or other large dangerous game, I would feel comfortable with the 300 but more comfortable with the 338.

    My $.02

  12. #12
    Member shirtr's Avatar
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    I have to agree with Dan and Montana on this subject. Even the 300WM has more than enough horsepower to do the jobs you require.

  13. #13

    Default Take the 300

    I have had both. There is a significant difference between the 300 and 338 rums in the recoil department. Felt recoil with the 338 was more punishing to me than the 416 rigby and 416 remington and about the same as the 375 AI.
    The 300 rum much easier to shoot IMO. I no longer own the 338 but I have 2 300 rums and would not part with either one. I've got a couple of rifles I've considered selling just because the last few years I always seem to grab a 300 when I'm heading out.

    USE PREMIUM BULLETS and the 300 rum puts em down quick.

  14. #14

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    thanks for the info. like i said i was leaning more for the 300 and since bigger is not always better i think that will be my caliber. next comes finding the rifle so ill keep on looking. any one have one they want to sell? just a thought

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