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Thread: Best Bi-Pod...

  1. #1
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Default Best Bi-Pod...

    Looking at getting a bipod for the stag 6L SV. From everything I read, Harris (the mobile benchrest) is one of if not the best. Anyone use one? They're definitely not cheap...

  2. #2
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    Not sure what your purpose is but for hunting I have found a lot of use for shooting sticks. They will really extend your range and they double as climbing sticks and for crossing creeks. Came in real handy for climbing around for goats on Kodiak, gave just a little extra safety edge. Taken a wide range of animals all over the world with them and pretty much don't hunt without them anymore because of the distance increase. I use Stoney Point and the only thing the long ones don't do well is prone. For prone I usually can find something else.

    This picture was taken about 1 hour ago. Hands are still bloody, liver is in the sink, will skin when I get done writing this. Flintlock 50 cal, 345 powerbelts, 98 yard straight on frontal shot off the sticks, iron sights with old tired eyes but the sticks make all the difference. Hit center neck and dropped instantly without a kick. Found the slug in the liver after taking out the spine above the lungs.
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  3. #3
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Only Ed M. has any experience??

    I'll be using this for varmint hunting and will likely need the ability to take the bipod on/off very easily and need it long enough to sit. Options?

  4. #4

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    I've been using Harris bi-pods for ever and can't see any reason to switch to anything else.

    In my younger day I did a whole lot of spot and stalk hunting for fox and coyote. I killed lots of stuff while laying on my belly in the snow and resting on a Harris.

  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Harris OR Versa Pod.

    There are also some very nice overpriced bipods made in the UK.

    There are some chinese copies (shooters ridge) of the early Harris type bipods on the market. They are made from junk metal as are many other products produced by our Benevolent Mandarin Overlords.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  6. #6
    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    Default harris

    9-13 pivioting then sanded to feet dia. abit so I can slide some 1" P.V.C. pipe on both of them about 30" worth for extentions. Learned it from a guy named vern dorn, old boy claims to have killed over 10,000 coyotes! I got a tape, he busts 5 dogs it one sitting!
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
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  7. #7

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    Rockpoint are pretty nice

  8. #8
    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    Default Versa pod

    I have used the Harris swiveling bipod after I already had a versa-pod and got rid of it ASAP. The versa-pod is the way to go. You get two studs so you can switch them bipod to each rifle. There is alot more mobility with the versa-pod than the swiveling Harris. You can actually lead your target (which I find essential for v-mints) with the Versa-pod, which was not possible with the Harris bipods that I tried out. The versa-pod may seem like it is gonna fold up on ya when you lean forwrd or back with it but I have NEVER had that happen to me.

  9. #9

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    I have the harris ultralight bipod and find it marginally useful around here. I tried using it on a caribou hunt, but found that the soft tundra and underbrush made it not really a practical tool. I find that the shooting stick is a much more functional rest device. On the other hand bi-pods have served me well hunting in Washington, Idaho and Colorado. Different terrain and environment. I take the shooting sticks for up here in the areas that I hunt. Although if you like the bipods I really like the Harris ultralight.

  10. #10
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    I like the Parker Hale myself, but its heavy and best suited to target work

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