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Thread: 45-70 for moose and grizzly.

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    Default 45-70 for moose and grizzly.

    Here's another one of my threads. I'm wondering is this about the same as the .30-06 power wise and will it do about the same job? Just wonderin.

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    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    External Ballistics:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/External_ballistics


    Muzzle Velocity:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzzle_velocity


    Muzzle Energy;
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzzle_energy

    This is the best software I’ve seen to date. It will show you the ballistics for “most” manufactured ammunition plus you can use this as a base for where you want to sight your gun in.
    For instance if you want to be in a 6” window from PBR out to 300 yds this tool will show you where you need to zero your particular rifle. This way you can avoid performing calculations at the moment of truth. Additionally it will show you the MV and ME at various rages.
    Look on the right side of this page under “Ballistic” Then click on “Ballistic US” a new window will pop up containing the tool.
    http://www.norma.cc/default.asp?Lang=2#

    If it were me and these were my only two options I would go with the 06 in a bolt action. However I can’t speak to the effectiveness of the 30-06 or a 45-70 on Moose or Griz, but there are plenty of folks here who have that experience.

    Good Luck

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    Default Hey Andrew

    45-70 is hard to compare to 06. Are you using Hornady lever revolution ammo. 325 gr spire type bullet. I use a Marlin XLR in 45-70 for my close gun with ghost ring sights. .375 H&H for my long gun. I row/drift hunt a 20' boat for moose and bears and have both rifles at my fingertips. The 45-70 is, at best, a 200 yard gun. And that's if you practice. The .375 is a 300 yard gun, also with practice. Both are extremely effective. There is no substitute for diameter and power, these two guns cover it all for me. This years moose and bear died exactly where they were shot. I decided to stop tracking shot animals. Good luck when you get here!

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    Default apples and oranges

    I don't think most guys would consider the 45-70 to be a great all around Alaskan hunting cartridge. It is fully capable of killing bears and moose, but you are much more range limited with it than with an '06. That being said, there are 2 caveats. First, the vast majority of Alaskan game is shot at ranges which would be suitable for a 45-70. Second, most Alaskans these days don't consider the '06 to be the best all around choice, either.
    I don't know what your shooting/hunting background and capabilities are, but here are my thoughts on what cheechakos should consider when buying an Alaska hunting rifle. You will not be at the top of the food chain here. The '06 is a capable round with plentiful ammo available if you don't load your own. Almost everyone can shoot it well. However, if you psych yourself out and go into the field thinking that you are under-gunned, your shooting will probably suffer and you will end up making poor decisions based on fear rather than the real world abilities of yourself and your rifle. I hunted with nothing but an '06 for almost 20 years, and lots of other Alaskans have, too. However, there are alternatives out there that you may be more comfortable with and that may give you a bit more margin for error/unexpected encounters/etc. The 35 Whelen is a good example. So is the 338-06. The 300 and 338 Win. Mags are also popular up here. The 375 H&H has been popular here for a long time, but I've seen lots of guys who were a little recoil shy with them.
    If forced to make a choice between the 45-70 and the '06, I'd take the '06 every time, but you may want to look at other options as well.

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    7mm mag. enough said!

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    So the 06 is a lot better choice?

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    Default mcsehl ?

    I have been enjoying shooting a Marlin 45/70 with the Hornady 325 gn ammo for 2 years now. Only one kill - a 300 lb black bear - bullet performed well on this size critter at 15 yards - complete pass through taking out shoulder on exit side. I have shot it in penetration tests into layered wood and pretty well matches my 300 win mag 180 grain loads out to about 125 - 150 yards.... I would agree with previous posts - keep it under 200 and it could do a good job.
    mcsehl, you seem to have dropped a few critters with the 45/70 - what kind of penetration are you seeing on this 325 grain load on moose? You also said last 2 you shot dropped in tracks - you didn't elaborate was it 45/70 or 375?
    Thanks

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    So the 45-70 will do it but at a shorter range than the 06 right?

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    Just get an '06. You won't be disappointed.

    Honestly, I'd look more at getting a quality rifle than wondering what cartridge is better than the other. Either cartridge is meaningless in a crap rifle.

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    Yeah that is true.

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    More than enough power, but you will need to be fairly close. 400-500 grain bullets. No need for a 300, 338, etc.. in many places you would hunt in Alaska. Much like in NC where people love their $2,000 custom Jarett rifles. Truth is, most shots are at 70-100 yards and the 30/30 has killed more deer than any gun ever made. You would be well served by a 45-70 in the brush. Just depends on where you plan on hunting. I have a stainless Marlin Guide Gun that I would not trade for double what I paid for it. Sent it to www.stevesgunz.com for an action job. Smooth as butter. Did the black spray on truck bed liner finish. Tough as nails and looks great. Cost $12. Very slick finish for about 2 hours of your time and $12. It goes on all my float trips. Best bear protection gun ever made. Loaded up with Buffalo Bore, it is pretty mean.

    Check out this website. When you get into the forums, choose the "45-70" and "Big Bore" forums. Lots to learn there. Great site and many ideas/pictures of customized 45-70's.

    http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    How avaible is 45-70 ammo?

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    It is extremely common. If you want good stuff, look at www.midwayusa.com Good selection there. Cabelas sells Buffalo Bore and other brands. The Hornady line has some good hunting ammo. They have a poly tip (or similar) with improved ballistics. But I am not familiar with this ammo. I load up 500 gr flat nose for bear protection. But to answer your question, this is very easy to get ammo.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    It is extremely common.
    Not in Alaska. I've been to several places that only stock the basic Springfield safe low powered stuff, if they stock it at all. You can find good 180 grn Rem coreloc just about anywhere in AK for the 30-06.

    I own both calibers. If I had to choose one over the other I wouldn't hesitate to grab the 30-06.

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    Default good point

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Not in Alaska. I've been to several places that only stock the basic Springfield safe low powered stuff, if they stock it at all. You can find good 180 grn Rem coreloc just about anywhere in AK for the 30-06.

    I own both calibers. If I had to choose one over the other I wouldn't hesitate to grab the 30-06.
    Doug is right. That is something you need to be aware of if you go with the 45-70. In many places, the only way to get the kind of loads that a modern rifle such as the Guide Gun is capable of shooting is to load your own. Factory loads that are safe for older rifles won't give you the performance that you're looking for. Not so with the '06.

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    The ammo is widely available online. Grizzly, Garrett, Buffalo Bore, etc...They make the most powerful stuff you could dream up. No need to roll your own unless you just enjoy reloading. And certainly nothing wrong with that. But this is a very common and popular cartridge with tons of load offerings commercially.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...set=ISO-8859-1

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...set=ISO-8859-1
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    The 45-70 is very effective on moose and bear, but its trajectory limits it to about 200 yds of effective range.

    The 30-06 will extend your range due to it's higher muzzle velocity, and I'd say it's effective range is further then most hunters can consistantly place their shots.

    If you want the best of both worlds, it's extremely difficult to top the 338 Winchester magnum. It shoots as flat as an -06, and hits as hard as the 45-70. Trouble is, it produces a wee bit of recoil, and many shooters don't shoot enough to learn to deal with that level of recoil.

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    The ammo is widely available online.
    Yes, but it's not available in Talkeetna...but there is 30-06 ammo on the top shelf at Nagley's. Nor could I did I see much 45-70 the last time I was in Bethel...but I could buy .308, .223 and 30-06 by the case. That was my point. Sometimes you forget the ammo, or you just run out.

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    I think I'll just stick with the 06.

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    Default good choice

    Quote Originally Posted by andrew cochran View Post
    I think I'll just stick with the 06.
    The '06 is never a bad choice. Since you're considering eventually living somewhere remote, its a good idea to have a rifle that you know you will be able to find ammo for wherever you are. Being forced to rely on the internet for a good supply of ammo is not an ideal situation. Depending on who wins the election, it may not even be possible in the future.

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