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Thread: tough goose

  1. #1
    Member bnkwnto's Avatar
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    Default tough goose

    I finally got my first goose but when my wife cooked it (rolled in flour and fried it like chicken) it turned out like rubber . Any ideas on how to cook goose/ducks so that the meat is tender? Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
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    Either Low & Slow(crockpot) or flash fried. If you over cook waterfowl it will become very tough. I'm guessing it was fried until it was cooked all the way through? Next time try frying in a smoking hot pan but pull it off while it's still pink on the inside, or put it in a crockpot with a onion and some cream of mushroom soup, etc.

    KK

  3. #3
    Member bnkwnto's Avatar
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    Default thanks

    If I'm lucky again this weekend I'll try the crock pot idea.

  4. #4
    Member mit's Avatar
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    crock pot took me 30 years to figure it out
    Tim

  5. #5

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    Another way to keep it moist is this. Breast the bird. I no longer worry about the legs, they are way too tough. If you insist on the legs, save them in the freezer until you have enough for the crock pot.

    Back to the breast meat. Lay breast out long ways and cut into 1" wide strips lengthwise, about 3 per breast. Season one side with salt, pepper, garlic powder and onion powder. NOTE: The seasonings should end up inside on the rolled up area, not the top or bottom. Roll into a circle 1" thick and then wrap with 2 pcs. of bacon. Put under broiler until bacon is done. This is a well known method of keeping meat moist.

    The bacon should cook before the goose is too well done, another tip for tender wild game. Do not over cook. I cooked this once on an outdoor kayak float trip and couldn't get them done fast enough. Cooked in a cast iron skillet over open fire. Even the vegetarians on the trip were wolfing them down.

    I have kids and this is the only way they want goose. Well besides the chinese stirfry I do.....But thats another post.

  6. #6
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    Default corning goose

    As mentioned crock pots are great for waterfowl in general.

    Another way I like to prepare my geese is to take the breast and leg meat and corn it. It tenderizes the toughest gander! I like to corn in batches and freeze whatever meat I won't need.

    Here's the way I do it:

    This is for 5 lbs. of meat...adjust accordingly for more or less

    Ingredients:
    6 Tbs Morton Tender Quick (usually found in the bulk salt section, you must use this...you can't substitute regular salt)
    6 Tbs sugar
    2 Tbs pepper corns
    1 Tbs dried onion flakes
    2 Bay leaves (crushed)
    1 tsp paprika
    1 tsp ground allspice
    1 tsp garlic powder
    1 tsp mustard seeds

    Mix dried ingredients together with about a quart of water and pour over your meat. Add additional water to completely cover the meat in the brine solution. Rotate meat pieces daily until ready.

    The meat needs to brine in a plastic or glass container in your fridge for at least 4-5 days, depending on thickness.

    Cooking:

    Cover breast & leg pieces with water (not your brine solution) and slow cook in a crock pot. I usually have potatoes, carrots, and boiling onions in the pot as well. I steam cook cabbage separately.

    Unused meat that has been brined (and not cooked) can be refrozen and cooked at a later date if you wish.

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