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Thread: Why do buffalo bore loads stick in 329pd?

  1. #1
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    Default Why do buffalo bore loads stick in 329pd?

    Hello all,
    So before I bought this S&W 329pd .44 mag, I researched it quite a bit. A review that I read said that the guy tested a bunch of loads and the Buffalo Bore were the only ones that had the spent shells stick in the cylinder. I noted that and when I received my 329pd I had accumulated 5 different loads to try on it. I went to RCRR today and tried all the different loads. They all fired great with good groupings, including the buffalo bore. But just like the guy said in the review, every single round of buffalo bore I fired, the spent shell was stuck in the cylinder.

    When I fired all six rounds and the tried to unload the cylinder, I had to tap the shells out. If I just loaded and fired 1 round, the shell would come out by hand, but with significant force required by me.

    So I was just curious if anybody knows what's up with that. I would think it would mean the shell casing itself is expanding when fired. But why this one and not the others (two corbon loads, American Eagle, and two other loads).

  2. #2
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    Default Here is an IMO answer....

    Buffalo Bore ammo is loaded to some pretty high pressure. The cylinder of your revolver expands at firing and allows the brass to expand more than a lower pressure load or a steel cylinder will. The cylinder then contracts back to its original size but the brass doesn't contract back as much. So it is a little larger than the cylinder and that is why it sticks. It doesn't matter which brass. I've duplicated the BB loads with different brass and the same powder, the still stick.

    This expansion upon firing is what gives those cylinders their strength, a stretch and not break engineering. I will say that load is a bit hard on the gun and I'm sure you'll agree it is also hard on the hand. Also some guns do not stick that brass but those that do do it with any brass loaded to that pressure level. Each one in the cylinder sticks and the ejector isn't enough to push them all out but can push out just one.

    Also BB has a 329 specfic load wich is a 255 grain, I think, and it will behave more sanely. The heavier bullets are the ones that I have found stick in the cylinder. Also It seems S&W is going away from the titanium cylinders and going back to steel. The 396 (44 special) that I have a growing interest for is about 24 ounces with Scanium frame and steel cylinder.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  3. #3
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    Default Buffalo Bore sticks ....

    Murphy nailed it down. BufBore's +P .44 Mag loads are high pressure. They do, however, make a load specifically for the 329PD ... at somewhat lower pressure, though still full, normal .44 mag pressure, just not +P. The load is labeled "Reduced Recoil." A 255 grain hard cast, Keith-style gas-checked @ about 1300 FPS. I put 2 full cylinders thru mine, and had easy extraction ... no sticking.

    As to the use of steel cylinders on the 396 Night Guard, That series is short barreled and defensive in nature. I assume that the steel cylinder lowers the price on the gun, and makes the gun more controllable for the less experience gunner. I have a 18 oz. 396 Mountain Lite, which digests BufBore's Heavy 44 Special loads (255 gr @975 FPS) with never a sticky case. With some of Elmer's pre-44 mag, +P .44 Special loads, it might get sticky.

  4. #4
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    Default To cure sticking

    Quote Originally Posted by AKF View Post
    Hello all,
    So before I bought this S&W 329pd .44 mag, I researched it quite a bit. A review that I read said that the guy tested a bunch of loads and the Buffalo Bore were the only ones that had the spent shells stick in the cylinder. I noted that and when I received my 329pd I had accumulated 5 different loads to try on it. I went to RCRR today and tried all the different loads. They all fired great with good groupings, including the buffalo bore. But just like the guy said in the review, every single round of buffalo bore I fired, the spent shell was stuck in the cylinder.

    When I fired all six rounds and the tried to unload the cylinder, I had to tap the shells out. If I just loaded and fired 1 round, the shell would come out by hand, but with significant force required by me.

    So I was just curious if anybody knows what's up with that. I would think it would mean the shell casing itself is expanding when fired. But why this one and not the others (two corbon loads, American Eagle, and two other loads).
    Well, there is no cure, really. High pressure loads will have sticky extraction, for the reasons cited by the other posters.

    However, there is hope (other than lowering the pressure).

    First, Make sure your brass is CLEAN and polished smooth.

    Second, VERY CAREFULLY and so as not to remove any metal, gently polish the insides of your chambers.

    Third, you may feel the desire to lightly lubricate your brass/chamber contact. Resist this impulse. Some lubricants get sticky when they dry, which will make the problem worse.

    Fourth, There are other factors of internal ballistics I am not qualified to address, so check with your gunsmith about #2 and #3.

    Remember, believe only half of what you see and one quarter of what you hear. That goes double for what you find on the internet. Including this post.

    Good Luck.

    Lost Sheep (Larry)

  5. #5
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    Default cleaning chamber of 329PD

    Cleaning the chamber of the 329PD is something to be done with serious caution. There is a special proprietary coating in the chamber and on the face of the cylinder. Abrasives must be avoided. On my 396 Mountain Lite, I've always used a foaming bore cleaner and patches.

    Perhaps others with 3-- series S&W experience can tell us how they clean their titanium cylinders. Or if they have ever had any difficulties with the Ti cylinder coating.

  6. #6
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    Default Learn something new every time

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Cleaning the chamber of the 329PD is something to be done with serious caution. There is a special proprietary coating in the chamber and on the face of the cylinder. Abrasives must be avoided. On my 396 Mountain Lite, I've always used a foaming bore cleaner and patches.

    Perhaps others with 3-- series S&W experience can tell us how they clean their titanium cylinders. Or if they have ever had any difficulties with the Ti cylinder coating.
    Thanks, Rick. I seem to learn something every time I visit the forum.

    Good thing I hedged my advice by suggesting checking with a gunsmith before polishing chambers. Also, read your owner's manuals. Titanium is new to me.

    Lost Sheep (Larry)

  7. #7
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    Default Any one tried a 359?

    I picked up one of the last 359 PDs in town for a good price - like the 329 but in .41 Mag. Cylinder is a bit thicker so i don't know if I can load it to higher pressures or not - probably not a good idea - but I'll play some with it anyway.

    The night guard with the SS cylinder is noticeably heavier that the 329 PD. I'm going to call S&W and see if they will make one with a titanium cylinder in it from the custom shop or fit one for me. The night guard with a titanium cylinder should be a really handy carry gun - the PD is not bad but the barrel is a bit long and the sights ar e better on the night guard for self defense.
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