View Poll Results: What meathod to prepare moose roast?

Voters
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  • BBQ

    3 5.36%
  • Pot Roast

    38 67.86%
  • Plain Roast

    3 5.36%
  • Something else entirely.

    12 21.43%
Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Best Way To Cook Moose Roast - Poll

  1. #1

    Default Best Way To Cook Moose Roast - Poll

    So my landlord dropped off about a 2 lb moose roast the other day. I have never prepared moose before and have got some different ideas on how to prepare it. Not sure what cut it is, looks like it could be the tenderloin. What are your thoughts:
    1) Slow cooked with BBQ sauce like pulled pork.
    2) Slow cooked like pot roast.
    3) Roasted plain like prime rib.
    4) Something else entirely.

  2. #2

    Default

    If you vote something else entirely, please post what that would be. I have two votes for something else but I have no idea what that something else is. Thanks.

  3. #3

    Thumbs up Slow Cook It

    We use to cook them on our wood stove now we use our slow cooker. After browning, Place a package of onion soup mix a cup of water, veggies and the roast in the slow cooker and go have fun. When you come home it is done.

    The sandwiches from the left over are great!


    Big Fisherman

  4. #4
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    Default BBQ is great too

    While I usually make a pot roast, BBQ is excellent as well. I take a bottle of Kraft Hickory Sauce and a touch of water and pour that over the roast in a crock pot. Let it cook while I am at work, come home, pulli tout of the pot, shred the meat, empty the pot of juices, put hte shredded meat back in, pour another bottle over the meat... YUM!

    I also occasionally will add onions while cooking, or just sautee up an onion when I am ready to serve..

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    We don't make roasts. I'm sure they can be good, but a childhood full of dry and flavorless roasts coupled with a friend who has shown me how to really cook has convinced me that there are better uses of meat. We cut our meat into smaller pieces and use it for things like stir-fry, bulgogi, samsushan (spelling?), and other spicy Asian dishes. We'll also cut them into thin strips and fry them in some bredding or soak in teryaki and grill lightly. All of the above are far better than roasts, in my opinion.

  6. #6
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    We don't make roasts. I'm sure they can be good, but a childhood full of dry and flavorless roasts coupled with a friend who has shown me how to really cook has convinced me that there are better uses of meat. We cut our meat into smaller pieces and use it for things like stir-fry, bulgogi, samsushan (spelling?), and other spicy Asian dishes. We'll also cut them into thin strips and fry them in some bredding or soak in teryaki and grill lightly. All of the above are far better than roasts, in my opinion.
    I have to choose other, and agree with Brian...Especially if this indeed tenderloin verses a tougher cut of meat.

    We most always cut our meat small, very small, like bite size pieces. Marinade it for at least 1/2 hour in a mix of 1/4-cup soy sauce, a little olive oil, dried or fresh onions, black pepper to taste and perhaps a little garlic. Then quickly fry in a smoking hot, heavy skillet. It is always tender as long as you don't overcook it . It goes good with everything.


    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    We don't make roasts. I'm sure they can be good, but a childhood full of dry and flavorless roasts coupled with a friend who has shown me how to really cook has convinced me that there are better uses of meat. We cut our meat into smaller pieces and use it for things like stir-fry, bulgogi, samsushan (spelling?), and other spicy Asian dishes. We'll also cut them into thin strips and fry them in some bredding or soak in teryaki and grill lightly. All of the above are far better than roasts, in my opinion.
    Should have followed your recommendation. The roast was too lean to do it in pot roast. It was DRY. Should have sliced and grilled it med rare.

  8. #8
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Smile crockpot #1: BBQ Moose

    crockpot #1: BBQ Moose

    Ingredients
    couple Tblspn of oil
    moose roast
    1 chopped onion
    1 to 4 chopped jalapeno or other hot pepper (to taste)
    salt and pepper (to taste)
    1 bottle favorite BBQ sauce.
    1 bottle/can of beer

    Serve with: Potato or wheat buns and wasabi cole slaw.

    Turn on your crockpot on high and throw in the oil while you are cutting the onion and peppers. Brown the moose in the oil. Once it is browned on all sides, dump in the onions and peppers. Smush those peppers before you put them in - let out all those yummy juices! Add salt and pepper. Dump in the bbq sauce and the beer. Try to position every thing so it is mostly covered in liquid. Cover and turn the crockpot down to the lower setting. Cook 6-8 hours. Check @ 4 hours if you are around. A stir around that time is benificial but not nessasary. Once it is all cooked and fork soft, you are ready. Pull the roast out and use two forks to pull it apart. I do this in a a serving bowl or in a tupperware I can store in the fridge. Wih all the meat pulled apart, I add the veggies and enough liquid from the crock to make it nice and saucy but not too soupy. I serve in on potato rolls. And making wasabi cole slaw to go with it is just amazing.

  9. #9
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default Grill #1 - Matambre - stuffed grilled moose

    The gist of this recipe is:
    - Spiral cut the roast so that you end up with a big flat rectangle.
    - Rub the moose lightly with oil (I use olive oil), both sides
    - Lay it on top of strips of bacon
    - Lay strips (no more than 1/2" diameter) of sausage, carrot, celery, cheese, ham, or anything else that sounds good. In one layer, covering 2/3 to 3/4 of the rectangle.
    - Roll it all up like a jelly roll. Starting at the end with veg/sausage layered end and ending on the end with no extra layer.
    - wrap in foil and grill til done. (internal temp ~ 180 degrees)
    - Let rest for a bit before serving.

    ...I am not doing the recipe justice copying it here. Google it or buy/borrow How to Grill: The Complete Illustrated Book of Barbecue Techniques by Steven Raichlen - I use his recipe.

    I have used this recipe on several of our smaller roasts. It is suprisingliy easy and fast. Besides that, it is pretty and very tasty. The ingredients can vary, so you can use what you have on hand. The meat comes out nice and moist and the vegtables are nicely cooked. Bacon is always a great ingredient.
    Last edited by grcg; 10-14-2008 at 14:43. Reason: forgot temp....

  10. #10
    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Default

    We cut our meat into smaller pieces and use it for things like stir-fry, bulgogi, samsushan (spelling?), and other spicy Asian dishes. We'll also cut them into thin strips and fry them in some bredding or soak in teryaki and grill lightly. All of the above are far better than roasts, in my opinion.
    [/quote]

    You'll find lots of packages of what we call "fry Meat" in our freezer when we cut up our own moose. When I find a piece of meat I think will make a good roast the main thing I do when cooking is keep it covered or use an oven bag. Also keep it in liquids while cooking even if you have to add water while it is cooking.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chauvotsm View Post
    Should have followed your recommendation. The roast was too lean to do it in pot roast. It was DRY. Should have sliced and grilled it med rare.
    You gotta cook game meat roasts in the plastic oven bags. They seal in the moisture and don't let it dry out even more than it already is.

  12. #12

    Default

    put it in a plastic bag add 1 onion sliced up, 3 bay leaves, 8-10 pepper corns, cover meat with buttermilk. Put in fridge turn over every day for 3-4 days remove from bag slow roast save drippings for gravy add sour cream to gravy to your liking best with potato dumpings but that is another recipe.

  13. #13
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default Wow....that sounds great!

    alaskamokaiman: That sounds really good! Thanks!

  14. #14
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    Default

    1 frozen moose roast
    1 package Lipton onion soup mix, sprinkle over roast
    1 cup of water

    crock pot, low heat for 8-10 hours

  15. #15
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default

    There are only 2 ways I will cook moose or caribou roasts. First is as a pot roast in the slow cooker. I brown it first, then slow cook it with a can of beef broth. I've never had one dry out that way. Second is in the smoker. I use a Brinkmann smoker with the pan of water in it. The water keeps it from drying out too much, and you can put your potatoes and carrots in the pan to cook them in the water and drippings off of the roast.

  16. #16

    Default

    Lots of lesson about food 35 years in the kitchen.
    Another hint about moose is to let it set out to warm up before you start to cook it. Cold meat + hot pan= tough meat. Season it and let it sit before you grill it.

  17. #17
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    Default

    The room temperature thing is with all meat. Going from 35-180 degrees should take a while, unless sliced thin.

    I threw some thin sliced moose on the grill tonight (gift from a friend). I let it sit in Yoshida's (teriyaki sauce from costco) for a few hours at room temperature. I slapped it on a hot grill for a few minutes each side.

    Yoshida's works pretty good for thin meat flavoring.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

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  18. #18

    Thumbs up My favorite

    I poke a dozen holes in the roast and insert a garlic clove in each. Then cover the roast with a heavy coat of all my favorite spices. Then Hot sear with bacon grease in a cast iron dutch oven. When meat is brown on all sides set oven on wood stove so to achieve a slow low temp. Use an digital meat gauge to remove meat off heat when roast internal temp reaches 138 F. The roast temp will continue climb for a while when standing. Never let meat get above 150 and you will never have a dry roast. 145 is perfect. Temperature and timing is everything, just like moose hunting...

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