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Thread: make and model of external frame backpacks

  1. #1

    Default make and model of external frame backpacks

    The pack has to have a shelf and padded straps hip and shoulder.Cost would be nice to see prices

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default best external frame pack....

    Ignor the price and purchase a pack from Barneys Sports Chalet.
    Check-outthe many past threads on this topic.....
    Dennis

  3. #3

    Default Ditto

    what AKTRUEADVENTURE says. Can't get any better than a barney's pack!

  4. #4
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Barney's Moose Packs

    I have been using Bob's moose pack (Barney's Pack) for many years and have never had a failure in the field. Top notch gear that you will only have to buy once. I'm attaching a photo of the pack in action. It does the job; just ask anyone in the commercial hunting business in Alaska and they'll tell you the same.

    HERE'S THE LINK to his website, but it is STILL under construction! Call Bob and light the fire on this thing already! He's been working on the site for over a year now...

    His number in Anchorage is 1 (907) 561-5242.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default

    Personally, I can't drop $500 on a pack and frame. I've always used the Camp Trails Freighter frame and "upgraded" the shoulder straps, belt, & back support piece. The frames are around $100. You can put nearly any pack bag on it too.

    Tim

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    Personally, I can't drop $500 on a pack and frame. I've always used the Camp Trails Freighter frame and "upgraded" the shoulder straps, belt, & back support piece. The frames are around $100. You can put nearly any pack bag on it too.

    Tim
    Tim, what straps do you upgrade with?

    I've been happy with my Cabelsa's Alaskan freighter frame & bag (7ish yrs old), but haven't hualed as many moose with it as I'd like. The suspension system seems comfortable to me, but when it dies or I get rich I intend to stick a Barneys suspension system on it.
    Vance in AK.

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  7. #7
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Default Don't cheap out on your gear...

    This is one area where you are going to be punished by poor choices in one way or another. I had three different backpacks--ALICE, mule, and Osprey. I purchased the top-o-the-line Barney's pack a month ago and I now have three packs that won't get used anymore.... If you were interested in the Mule external frame or the Osprey internal frame I'd be happy to make you a good deal. The Mule has been used little and the Osprey only once. They are in excellent condition and will be preserved as museum pieces since I won't use them after buying a Barney's pack.

    I packed in two sleeping bags, tent, bedroll, three days of underclothes, flyrod/reel/lures, food, water, medical kit, TAG bags, nasty weather gear, and still had room for 3/4 of a caribou. These packs ROCK and you'll count yourself as one smart cookie for saving the trouble of having the right gear the first time--I am a knucklehead no longer!

    PM if you' like to check out these other packs.

    IceKing02

  8. #8
    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    Default about the meat shelf

    another thing that I have noticed is that the packs that have the meat shelves, have them waaaaayy to low. Once you rest a 1/4 on that shelf the weight is to low for comfort and ease of movement. I found it easier to just put the 1/4 in my pack (resting on top of the sleeping bag separater), so therefore, the meat shelf isnt a HUGE selling point to me. Also, as far as I have seen (I could be wrong tho), Barneys frames dont have that shelf and they have seemed to work great.

  9. #9

    Default

    I thought the meat shelf was the most comforting thing on a backpack frame. The angle would take stress off the tie downs and help keep the load secure. Tie a load to a verticle surface verses a horizontal surface, which way to go? I'm leaning towards BULL-PACS frames because of price, there experiences,and lifetime warranty. If Barney's could get there act together I could compare products on line.

  10. #10
    Member ripnlip's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by haff202 View Post
    I thought the meat shelf was the most comforting thing on a backpack frame. The angle would take stress off the tie downs and help keep the load secure. Tie a load to a verticle surface verses a horizontal surface, which way to go? I'm leaning towards BULL-PACS frames because of price, there experiences,and lifetime warranty. If Barney's could get there act together I could compare products on line.
    you are correct about the vertical vs. horizontal, but my point was where that horizontal surface is positioned on the frame. Seems like the meat shelf (horizontal surface) is down by my butt, even with the frames tightened all the way up. Obviously, most of the weight needs to be centered on your back.

    Good luck, those bull-pacs look pretty good, never had the chance to use one.

  11. #11
    Member chano's Avatar
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    Default

    Bull pacs are nice, But...Barneys waist and shoulder straps (suspension system) are much more comfortable, there really is no comparison. Don't make the same mistake I did order the Barney's first. However, I do like bull pacs solid frame tough as nails.

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    It's really, really easy to sling a moose quarter where it should be (center of mass between your shoulder blades) on a conventional packframe with no shelf. Support the quarter vertically by tying a rope loosely between your upper frame posts, and half-hitching the hock area. Then, use a couple of compression straps or more rope to hold the quarter tightly against the frame. I've never seen a "meat shelf" get the load up anywhere close to where it should be, and this results in having to pack the load stooped over. This is way rough on the muscles around your hips that never get used for anything other than, uh, well, packing meat in a stooped-over position.

    Photos are of two 110+ pound moose hindquarters on a now-discontinued Dana Design external frame pack:

    BTW, I have used that packframe to haul an awful lot of very heavy stuff, and I really like it. Barney ain't the only game in town for brutally heavy stuff. You can find them on ebay and craigslist from time to time - the Dana Design models in question are the Terraframe, Shortbed, and T1. I also have a Longbed, but the bag is integral with the waistbelt harness and can't be removed, so I don't favor it. The frame you see is off my Terraframe.
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    Smile

    Welll I used a camptrails for many years that I got from barneys because I couldnt afford the real thing. I recently picked up a barely used barneys cheap and it is from heaven. I can assure you that if you pay full price you wont be disappointed. I am sure that I can carry a lot more weight given the extra padding of the thing. I was always worried about breaking my camptrails, now I will only worry about breaking me. I dont think I could carry a fully loaded barneys. They have good prices at the sportsmans show in March at the Sullivan.
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    guys will by sitka gear clothes, swaro optics, custom rifles and then go cheap on the one thing that will actually cause you pain?? never understood that. i have four barneys packs, loaners for my clients so i don't have to watch them try to figure out what strap number 32 does on their cabela's pack, or hear about them sweating to death under a internal frame pack like the kifaru long hunter thats about five times as heavy empty as an empty barney pack. granted they are never carrying the weight i've got, hopefully, but at least i know they are going to be comfortable when they are packing stuff.
    some stuff will work good, some stuff will work GREAT.
    some things you buy, some things you invest in.
    invest in your back....
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  15. #15
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    haff202,
    I agree with the posts above. A Barney's pack is the way to go. although it is a sizable investment. You can't go wrong with one. Even there resale value is great. You don't see them in the classified section to often, and if you do there not there long. I myself could not afford the cost of a Barney's pack. So I found a camptrails frame and bought the shoulder straps, yoke and suspention system from Barney's (once apon a time camptrails made the frames for Barney's) Everything fit properly It was less expensive initial investment. Barney's even put everything I purchased on my packframe for me. Please don't missunderstand. This is not a Barney's pack now. It is heavier. But this winter when I have a little more cash, Santa is going to bring me a Barney's pack frame for Christmas. Then I will have a complete Barney's pack frame, and hopefully a bag on the frame too.

    Alaskan100

  16. #16
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default Camp trails

    Hey Jake, sounds like me! For what it is worth, weight is the key reason my Camp Trails has and is my go to pack. It come is at ~5lbs with the bag and has handled ~100lbs loads with no problem for years. I did monkey around with the hip belt/ strap placement and lowered the shelf tie on to get it tuned, but good to go now.

    I have the previously mentioned Dana Designs Long track and an expensive internal frame gathering dust in my closet.

    When I'm cutting my tooth brush in half I don't need to start off with an 8 lb pack. Plus not being in the guide business I don't wind up packing Moose hind quarters multiple times a year. Heck, I got the other guys to carry them this fall.

    As always opinions/reasons vary, but that is what make a horse race interesting.

  17. #17
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    dave, man camp trails have been carrying moose for years haven't they!! thats what i was wearing when i started in the business. for short heavy trips they work great. i don't do moose hunts and haven't packed a moose in about seven years, my loads are long trips between 20-60 miles and involve a 70lb pack or so just about the entire time, so its more of a longevity thing for me that a shorter brutal pack out of mass weight. unless its a big bear hide or a goat, then its a shorter brutal hike, but not as brutal as with my old camp trails.
    They all work, no arguement there for sure...just how you feel when YOUR working with one....but your right, in the guide business its a little easier to justify a barney bag. everything else i own, i buy from walmart! lol
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  18. #18
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Good choice for good reasons- maybe not for everyone

    The Barney's frame + pack is a spendy outlay. Other packs get plenty of use here (Eberlestock, Cabelas, Kelty, Ospreys), maybe for different requirements/ individuals/ budgets. Try Advanced Search then google search of outdoorsdirectory for these manufactuer names.

    In another thread about packs, Lujon said something about "...trunks, sometimes you need the room". Some specific External frame packs, 5,000 cu in or more (from Backpacker magazine 2008 gear guide):
    Jansport Carson, 4900 cu in, 4lbs, 13oz, $130.
    Bergans of Norway Finnmark, 6100 cu in, 6# 14oz, $349
    Bergans of Norway Powerframe, 7900 cu in, $486
    Most like external frames, but sheephunters often favor internal frames - depending on your planned use.

    Other ways to consider Barney's packs: Of other backpacks in the 6000+ cu in range; many are in the $400-$500 range. which makes Barney's Carnivore Freighter frame ($279) and packs (Packer $219, Hunter $279, Pinnacle $279) seem a little more in line with the market. Note Barney's Freighter frame is available separately - you could combine with another make pack if you wish. Strap into the Freighter frame if you can. The Padding and adjustability of the straps is impressive to many.

    As so many consistently comment in these threads, Barney's packs have passed the field test, and their sales support a local (Alaska) business, who provides great service and seems to offer only top notch gear. Plenty to like.

    Good luck.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    guys will by sitka gear clothes, swaro optics, custom rifles and then go cheap on the one thing that will actually cause you pain?? never understood that. i have four barneys packs, loaners for my clients so i don't have to watch them try to figure out what strap number 32 does on their cabela's pack, or hear about them sweating to death under a internal frame pack like the kifaru long hunter thats about five times as heavy empty as an empty barney pack. granted they are never carrying the weight i've got, hopefully, but at least i know they are going to be comfortable when they are packing stuff.
    some stuff will work good, some stuff will work GREAT.
    some things you buy, some things you invest in.
    invest in your back....
    You can get good packs and not spend $500. The Dana Packs are about as good of a pack as money can buy and if your lucky you can get 2-3 of them for less than a Barney's pack... However, the only way to know on any pack is to buy one, put some weight in it, and put some miles on. 50lbs-70lbs still feels like 50lbs-70lbs, even if your pack cost $500...

    The Camp Trail frame is the foundation of the Barney pack and you can find those for a deal. I think I paid $12 for one off of eBay a few years back. It seems to do a REAL nice job for the dollars.

    With that said, the Barney's have a proven rep and if you got the money knock your self out.

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