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Thread: New to Reloading....questions

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    Default New to Reloading....questions

    I am looking at buying a RCBS supreme master reloading kit from Cabelas(Sportsmans WH if they can match the price). I will be reloading for the most part for hunting and basic target practice, 300 rum, 44 mag and 9mm. I pretty much know absolutly nothing about reloading hence the kit.The kit does not come with a case trimmer and was wondering if a hand one is ok for now? What is recommended to buy as far as powder,bullets,primer ect just to get started? Is there anything I should steer clear off? The first 100 rounds or so will be just for practice till I get into it a little more and learn alot more. Will probably start out with the 300RUM just loading target rounds. I have alot to learn and it looks like this site has alot to help. Any advice would really be appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2

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    You just want to target shoot with the 300 RUM??? If You want to target shoot, go with a .308. If you want to hunt, go with a 300 WM or WSM. If you want to hunt long range, go with the 300 RUM and 200 gr AB's pushed with about 95 gr of Retumbo. The 300 RUM isn't a target cartridge, it's a long range thumper.

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    I guess what I meant was I want to try some of my own reloads in it, see what I like and dislike before I hunt with them. I have fired alot of factory rounds with it,at game as well as targets, and it will be interesting and just plain fun to try my own ( Not a cheap factory round to buy). I kinda have alot of time on my hands this winter and will enjoy learning a new skill and hobby. After reading more on this site I can see I am ignorant to the reloading stuff but I gotta start somewhere and this looks like a good place. Did a search and have already learned alot. The Lee kits look good and the price is alot less than RCBS but still swaying towards RCBS. Will look into it more later. Thanks

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    Default Reloading

    Quote Originally Posted by Stormy View Post
    I am looking at buying a RCBS supreme master reloading kit from Cabelas(Sportsmans WH if they can match the price). I will be reloading for the most part for hunting and basic target practice, 300 rum, 44 mag and 9mm. I pretty much know absolutly nothing about reloading hence the kit.The kit does not come with a case trimmer and was wondering if a hand one is ok for now? What is recommended to buy as far as powder,bullets,primer ect just to get started? Is there anything I should steer clear off? The first 100 rounds or so will be just for practice till I get into it a little more and learn alot more. Will probably start out with the 300RUM just loading target rounds. I have alot to learn and it looks like this site has alot to help. Any advice would really be appreciated. Thanks
    Stormy,

    Welcome to the forum and welcome to reloading.

    Advice #1 Buy a copy of "ABC's of Reloading" and one or two other reloading manuals. The manuals have loading data, but you want to read the parts that address the steps of reloading, on which most all reloading manuals have at least one chapter.

    The reason you want more than one or two is that you want to read differing authors/editors writing styles and find ones that "speak" to you. You also get better coverage of the subject; one author or editor may cover parts of the subject more thoroughly than the others.

    Only after you know the steps can you look at the contents of a reloading kit and know what parts you will use and what parts the kits lack.

    Advice #2 You mentioned RCBS. Lee makes good equipment, too, but is generally considered the "economy" equipment maker. Almost every manufacturer of loading equipment makes good stuff; if they didn't, they would lose reputation fast and disappear from the marketplace. Better equipment costs more generally. Cast aluminum is lighter, cheaper and less durable. Cast iron lasts practically forever.

    Advice #3 Learn on a single stage press or a turret press. Do not learn on a progressive press.

    Advice #4 Tungsten Carbide dies for your straight-walled cartridge cases. They do not require lubrication which will save you time.

    Advice #5 Find a mentor. There is no substitute for someone watching you load a few cartridges and critiquing your technigue BEFORE you develop bad habits or make a dangerous mistake. (A mistake that might not have consequences right away, but maybe only after you have escaped trouble a hundred times until one day you get bit. For instance, having case lube on your fingers when you handle primers. 99 times, but the hundredth primer may not be perfectly sealed and now winds up "dead")

    After you have been mentored, mentor someone else. Not necessarily in loading or the shooting sports, but in SOMETHING in which you are enthusiastic and qualified. Just give back to the community.

    Advice #6 Wear eye protection, especially when seating primers

    Advice #7 Don't pinch your fingers in your press.

    Advice #8 Read previous threads on reloading, here are a couple I read.
    http://forums.accuratereloading.com/eve
    http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543
    http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/view...fbd5ae1f754eec
    The second one is a thread started by a new recruit to reloading whcih the moderators thought highly enough of to make it "sticky" so it stays on the top of the list of threads.

    Advice #9 When you buy the very best, it hurts only once, in the wallet. When you buy too cheap, it hurts every time you use the gear. The trick is to buy good enough (on the scale between high quality and low price) to keep you happy without overpaying.

    Advice #10 Verify for yourself everything you learn. Believe only half of what you see and one quarter of what you hear. That goes double for everything you find on the internet (with the possible exception of the actual web sites of the bullet and powder manufacturers). This advice applies to my message as much as anything else.

    Good luck, good shooting and good night.

    Larry (Lost Sheep)

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    Great advice, Larry!!

    I would also recommend the Redding Big Boss single stage press or the Big Boss II single stage press. Both have a deep throat for the large bore magnums and I especially like the offset opening. The sell it in kit form and some online places have some great prices!!

  6. #6

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    Stormy, sorry if I came off a little gruff. I was just a little surprised you mentioning target shooting with a 300 RUM. It's a real kickin' gun and as you mentioned, not cheap to shoot.

    Larry has some good advice on the reloading. I personaly never like buying kits. I think the best approach is to shop each item for the quality and function you need and want.

    RCBS makes good dies, Redding dies are a little better. You might also consider getting a competiton bullet seat depending on how acurate you want to be.

    As for bullets and powders. I think Barnes TSX's, Nosler E-Tips and Accubonds in the 180-200 gr range are good choices. I would start with Retumbo and H1000 powder. They are both temp stable powders and seem to do well in the 300 RUM. I mentioned 95 gr of Retumbo behind a 200 gr Accubond and that seems to be a populaar load that will generally get about 3200 fps, but... DO NOT start your load development there. Start 6 or 7 gr lower and work up. I would probably go 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 92.5, 93, 93.5, 94, 94.5, 95 until you start seeing signs of excessive preasure.

    Cheers and happy reloading,

    Mark

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stormy View Post
    I am looking at buying a RCBS supreme master reloading kit from Cabelas(Sportsmans WH if they can match the price). I will be reloading for the most part for hunting and basic target practice, 300 rum, 44 mag and 9mm. I pretty much know absolutly nothing about reloading hence the kit.The kit does not come with a case trimmer and was wondering if a hand one is ok for now? What is recommended to buy as far as powder,bullets,primer ect just to get started? Is there anything I should steer clear off? The first 100 rounds or so will be just for practice till I get into it a little more and learn alot more. Will probably start out with the 300RUM just loading target rounds. I have alot to learn and it looks like this site has alot to help. Any advice would really be appreciated. Thanks
    I think there are more good questions ask about reloading than any other subject on these forums. This year will make 45 years that I've been making my own ammo. I got sixty six email and PM questions about it last week, apparently some think I know enough to answer their questions. I prefer to do it here so more can benefit from my meager knowledge. These emails are because folks don't want to post in public because of the way it seems to turn into a pissin' contest about this equipment or that or this bullet or caliber or some other off the subject out of context diatribe.
    Well we could all try to do one better.

    Several on this note pad have many years of experience stuffin' cases and have good info to add. Larry the lost sheep has listed a few pointers and thanks for the sticky tip, maybe I'll try something like that. I'll point out a few specifics since you listed the calibers.

    First; buy the book. The ABC's of reloading is fine but you'll need more than that and that should be your first purchase. The Speer #14, the Nosler #6 and the latest Hornady number they are up to are all very good with the how to use the equipment sections. Also they have data for your calibers.

    Second; dont ask a clerk at a store, no matter how big the store or how intelligent looking the clerk is, any question about reloading, especially about powder.

    Third; study the books and ask questions before you buy equipment.

    Fourth; seek and find someone with an active reloading bench who has actually made ammunition this century and have a look around. Ask and and listen. You need to see an actual working bench with equipment installed and see it used.

    I teach reloading classes and have helped well over a hundred people get started in handloading but I understand it is hard to find a mentor, many factors come into this. Here is some frequent mistakes by new handloaders.

    They ask the wrong people for answers: Clerks and jerks.

    They buy equipment before they know what they need or what they could or should get for their money: Working within a budget you can still get good equipment because you do not need every item on the shelf to do a good job making ammo. Some kits will eat up your money with un needed items. You don't need a powder measure, you need a scale. You don't need a trimmer, you need a caliper to measure if your brass is too long. You throw it in the trim box and trim it when you get the $$$ for a good trimmer.

    They buy powder and primers before reading the books and consulting with a professional: Many powders work, some work better. Also if you have two or three rifle calibers you may be able to get by very well with one powder for all calibers or you may need three.

    They get into reloading to save money: Those of us who have been loading for a while probably got into it for that reason way back when but it is almost laughable to do that today. We know you won't save money.

    They looking at loading as a chore: If you don't love it leave it alone. It is far too important to not take it seriously. It is and should be a very enjoyable hobby. I believe learning all you can about it before you start will, how do you say, enrich the experience.

    Specifically for you with the 300 RUM, the 44 mag and the 9mm you will need:

    A powder such as RL-25, CCI-250 or other brand large rifle magnum primers and .308" caliber bullets of choice. You'll need two powders for the 44, maybe H110 or Lil'Gun for magnum loads and maybe Unique or Trail Boss for light loads, if you want such. You need large pistol magnum primers for the H110 or Lil'Gun powder in the 44, it sucks with standard primers. You'll need small pistol standard primers for the 9X19 and large pistol standard for light loads in the 44. 44's use .429" or .430" bul;lets, 9mm uses .355" bullets. You probably already know this but just in case.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Wow, I guess I jumped into this with " guns ablazen" without a whole lot of research. Went out "the road" here in Cordova yesterday and fired alot of factory rounds out of the 300RUM and 44mag. I enjoy shooting and was thinking how nice it would be to learn a new hobby and reload for my sons and me. I have way too many hobbies already but this sounded like something I would enjoy doing for the slow winter. Really thought I could just go and buy a kit and get started.
    Thanks to you guys on this site I think I am going to step back, regroup and do alot of research and do it right. I don't really need some top dollar, high speed, top of the line relaoder but if I am going to spend the money I want what will work for me. This will make it much more enjoyable as well as cost effective. Its obvious that most of you are very expierenced at reloading and all of you give about the same advice which I appreciate."RESEARCH" I am sure I am going to be asking many more questions and using you guys for you expertise and knowledge. The search on here is a great start. Thanks

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    stormy, if you are anyhting like me you might like some video instruction.
    Take a look at these selections.

    This page is from Midway:
    http://www.midwayusa.com/ebrowse.exe...=10614***15810***

    This one from Cabels'a:
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...pod&id=0024487

    Another that gets good reviews:
    http://www.amazon.com/Learn-Handgun-.../dp/B0006PT29Y

    It can be a ver technical hobby, but it's not brain surgery. With a little reading & video viewing, (& a mentor if you can find one) you really can be turning out factory quality ammo in just a few rounds.
    It's a lot of fun, but you won't save money! You'll just shoot a LOT more for the same money!
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Stormy, here's an updated version of the DVD listed at the Amazon site. The reviews on the Amazon site a very good & make it sound like it wouldbe right up your alley. Even uses the RCBS press kit you mentioned (I'm a Lee guy myself, but have owned & used a lot of RCBS & it's great stuff. My 1st press was an RCBS Rockchucker.

    http://learnreloading.com/
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Default It's those NEW handloaders again. No wonder there's a Primer Shortage

    Murphy's is the best advice for someone considering handloading I've ever seen, bar none.

    Your primary question seemed to be which case trimmer to get. I use a Forster, but there are other good ones, and maybe better ones.

    The Lee case trimming tools are probably the most economical way to go initially, although they are case specific, and trim to a set length only.

    Here is my Minimum List of handloading tools.

    Press (If you are loading a large bottle-necked case, get a heavy press)
    Dies (For the cartridge you will be loading)
    Shell Holder (One that fits your cartridge case)
    Case Lube
    Rag.
    Primer Pocket Cleaning Tool (You could use a slotted screwdriver of the right size.) (Better yet, use a Primer Pocket Uniformer.)
    Dial Caliper (To measure case length)
    Case Trimmer (You will need one eventually.)
    Chamfer Tool
    Primer Seater (The press may have a primer arm to seat primers with.)
    Powder Scale (Even if you were using a powder measure, you’d need a scale to set it.)
    Powder Funnel
    Loading Data

    Good Luck in making the decision, and if you decide to do it.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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    Stormy,

    You are quite correct that reloading is very fun and a very good pass time for the winter. There isn't much I would rather do in the evenings when it is bitterly cold outside than to sit at my reloading bench and listen to a hockey game on the radio. During the winter I work up loads for a particular gun as well as load all of the ammo that I will likely shoot all summer. Reloading isn't difficult to do or to learn. It just takes a lot of attention to detail when doing it. An investment of no more than $500 will have you some very good equipment that will last a lifetime plus. All of the manufacturers make good stuff. It's hard to go wrong buying any name brand equipment...RCBS, Lyman, Hornady, Redding, and even Lee. The RCBS kit that you mentioned is a very good place to start. I started with a Lyman kit almost exactly like the one you are looking at from RCBS. Before you buy any equipment I recommend you read a little first. These links will take you to the two books that I started with. These two books got me a full understanding of the basics then as I would buy bullets from different manufacturers like Speer, Sierra, and Hornady I would buy their loading books as well. It doesn't take long and you will have quite the selection of reference books. Going through the "ABC's of Reloading" and "Lyman's 49th" will also help you determine what equipment you need to get started.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...672&hasJS=true

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...672&hasJS=true

    Before long reloading will become an obsession that we call Handloading.

    Welcome to the sickness!

    Dan

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    Default I'm a Handloader......

    This is what I have for equipment.

    Dies: Redding mostly, RCBS for several calibers and some Forster Bench Rest dies. I have several custom sets mostly from Redding and I have several sets of dies for common calibers with custom features such as special neck size. I also have many extra helful little tidbits for dies such as tapered expander buttons, carbide expander buttons and some bushing type dies of and for Redding dies.

    Press: Redding Big Boss, T-7 Turret, Dillon 550.

    Caes trimmer: Forster with all three length bases, collets and pilots to fit 17 Hornet to 50 cal Browning. Redding model 2400 with pilots (uses same pilots as Forster. Standard deburring tools from Forster, Redding and Sinclair. Primer pocket uniformer (carbide) Redding and Sinclair Small pistol/rifle, Large pistol and large rifle. I have power driver attachments for all these. Redding and Wilson primer flash hole uniformer and deburring tools.

    Scales: Pact electronic Scale and powder dispenser. Redding Balance beam (mechanical) and smaller Pact battery powder.

    Powder Measure/Dispenser: Redding 10X pistol measure. BR-30 small rifle/large pistol measure, Redding #3BR large capacity powder measure.

    Primer seater: RCBS bench mounted Auto Primer tool.

    The trimmers, powder measure stand and bench primer tool are mounted on a finished piece, 12" by 18" ,of 3/4" ply wood which is mounted to the bench with one 3/8" bolt. This allows it to pivot to where one side faces the front and allows access to which ever tool I need, primer, powder stand, or trimmers. Also on this is a hand crank holder for the Sinclair deburring tool and my battery powered driver for the trimmers and primer pocket tools. Extra pilots, collets, shafts, cutters, neck reamers, etc rest in an assortment kit box on the bench shelf. The bench is 8' wide and 36" deep with a full length, 4' high book shelf (die shelf) and peg board.

    I also have an assortment of those little plastic bin boxes that you get at Home Depot that come with the flat track, screw mountable plastic boards. I mount these tracks to the front edge of the bench and can then hang the boxes on the racks in convient places to drop finished cases into as I do each step. The press operations, the timming/deburring and priming operations I just drop the case in the box and grab the next. This way I reduce the time by have for each of these operations. (Time and motion study, manufacturing engineering 604).

    I load about 400 rounds of rifle each week year round and usually mix that with about a thousand handgun rounds every other week. Right now everything is done on the single stage or the turret, the 550 is not set up as it isn't needed for the smaller quantities.

    This really isn't a commercial operation now it is more of a load for a few friends level but it is a bit more of an operation than most load your own operations. Certainly, starting out to load a few calibers you could get by well with 1/3 this equipment. I didn't mention any of the little things that make all this easier and quicker to make ammo. The ammo trays that hold cases waiting to be charged and after they are charged with powder, i can't throw them in the bins. These trays are diffferent sizes for different calibers and of course several are needed. The powder funnels and drop tubes and other little plastic gizmos that make things go much smoother.

    Anyway, I thought some might want to know what I have and use for what it's worth. I think this info and about 5 bucks will get you a gallon of gas.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  14. #14

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    Stormy,
    Don't let these long winded fella's scare you out of getting started. They just have so much info in their heads that sometimes a bunch of it spills out all at once and confuses the heck out of some of us.
    Get a kit, the one you mentioned is great, and a couple of books and the dies and shell holders for your guns. Then start setting things up and when you get stuck on something come back here. Once that's done pick a load out of the book and put one round together. If something doesn't make sense or doesn't seem right you know what to do. There's usually way to many options for us beginners when it comes to loads for a given round (which powder, bullet, etc.) so once again just ask here for a good starting load.
    I've asked questions here that seemed impossible to me and got so much info back that I had to go take a nap. These guys like to help and remember, there are no dumb questions when it comes to playing with explosives.
    You see, in this world there's two kinds of people, my friend: Those with loaded guns and those who dig. You dig.

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    Idahoducker, I am on track with ya so far.Just about one button away from the rcbs kit, ordered the abc of reloading as well as a dvd for beginners. This is all due to the advice of the people on this forum and also a couple of friends. By far I am not scared to get started but it does seem a little over whelming but I am sure I will do fine. Its like a novice asking me about wilderness survival, its one of my hobbies. There are basic survival skills then there is extendend wilderness living. I can teach basic skills that you have to know and master before moving on but its hard to teach a novice and not keep thinking way ahead to the advanced skills I know that work for me, much more in depth than the basics. Most of the poeple on this forum are experts by far and are way past the basic level and and want to give advice and well earned knowledge on what works for them. I like that! I am no way ready to buy powder and bullets and cases and primers yet. I have read over 20 differen't ways to reload a 44 mag and there are lots and lots more to go and I am sure they all work, its finding what I like and what works for me at the basic level ,for now. Thanks for the input!

  16. #16

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    Here's a little tip. Get some "One Shot" case lube. It's way better than the gel syle and rolling your cases on a pad, which eventually builds up in your die. Quick, claen, easy and IMO does a way better job.

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    Wow, Murphy:
    I have a much, smaller selection, but it's good to have a variety of tools. I can choose which I like best for a particular cartridge.

    With all the loading you do, you probably use most of your tools, at one time or another, or at least feel you need to have them on hand.

    MR:
    I use the One-Shot for some cartridges, and applications, myself, but not for everything.

    Stormy:
    This is probably on down the line for you, but I've learned to be careful when someone describes a "Method" of doing something. It can sound real good, and even be repeated by everybody and his brother, until it's considered to be absolute fact, but when you actually try it, it ain't Xactly that way. There are variables, and variables.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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    So Stormy are you overwhelmed yet? Don't worry, that's part of the sickness of handloading. Something that helped me to overcome the selection through the mass of data when I was starting out was that I picked one manufacturer for each component. My first loads were for my 30-30 Winchester. Since my 30-30 is a Winchester developed load I chose Winchester brass. A little looking in some of the loading reference manuals and manufacturers web sites it didn't take long to figure out that 150 gr and 170 gr Round Nose bullets were about the most popular. When I bought my bullets I picked Hornady brand because they were sitting on the shelf at the store. With powder it seemed that IMR brand came up more often than not. A little more looking showed that there were loads for IMR 4064 powder in both the 150 gr and 170 gr. Then again, because I was shooting a 30-30 Winchester and Winchester brass I got Winchester large rifle primers. I loaded up some of these at the recommended starting loads and attacked a paper target at 50 yards. With this load as my base I started working up the loads by increasing powder in small increments. It wasn't long until I found what my rifle liked with these components. This became my baseline with which I would measure other loads against.

    Now is when the fun started. I decided to try a different powder and see what happened. Back to my reference material and wanting to keep things of the same manufacturer I tried some IMR 4320 powder. I really couldn't tell much difference betwen the two loads so now I had two powders that would give realtively equal results with all other components being the same. This could go on and on with switching powders, primers, brass, and bullets. i.e., This is what i do in the winter. I'm not sure what I'll do with this rifle this year, but for sure I will try something different in my component mix. Were I simply interested in hunting with my 30-30 I could stop with what I have now and have a great degree of confidence in my handloads for this rifle. However, I like shooting and handloading so I'll experiment some more.

    Dan

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Stormy:
    This is probably on down the line for you, but I've learned to be careful when someone describes a "Method" of doing something. It can sound real good, and even be repeated by everybody and his brother, until it's considered to be absolute fact, but when you actually try it, it ain't Xactly that way. There are variables, and variables.

    Smitty of the North
    Smitty, good point... Maybe Stormy should try both methods and see for himself. IMO, there is no comparison, but he will never know how much better it is if he doesn't try both.

    Stormy, *my* technique for this is to hold 3 cases between my thumb and finger and give them a light shot on the neck and shoulder, then rotate them about a half turn and give them another light shot. I neck size only. If you FL size you'll want to get more of the brass maybe spray from a couple different angles in a shell holder tray. Like Smitty says, you'll hear a lot, but that is what this forum is all about, sharing ideas and info.

    Cheers

  20. #20

    Default New to Reloading....questions

    Hello and welcome, I to just returned to the reloading scene thanks to my wife and will have to "ditto" everyone here. Remember to think first and shake left handed with those that didn't. Anyway, just do your research and buy what works for you. We all have our opinions and I would have to say these guys are an excellant source of knowledge. Just an FYI, I personally love Trailboss for plinkin with my 44 Redhawk. Hows the weather in Cordova? Valdez just got about 2" and it has mostly melted off.

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