Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Shooting .45's in a S&W .460

  1. #1
    Member DanAKAL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    130

    Default Shooting .45's in a S&W .460

    Having just got my 460V I'm interested in loading it for plinking at the range with .45's. My experience in shooting .38's in a .357 has been less than stellar. It was always a problem cleaning the ring left in the chambers of the .357 where the .38 brass stopped. So much so that I pitched all of my .38 brass and started loading .357 brass to low specs that were pretty close to the .38 performance. Are any of you shooting .45's in a .460 with good results? Although I haven't seen a lot of data, perhaps I could load .460 brass down to .45 specs.

    Dan

  2. #2

    Default Well....

    I don't have a 460, but I shoot 45colt in my 454 and I always have to clean the chambers really well before I try to shoot 454 or I get stuck cases on the goop.

  3. #3
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fenton,Michigan
    Posts
    815

    Default

    DanAKAL, check out this link to Smith and Wesson. Should give you the answers.

    http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/w...-1&isFirearm=Y

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    7

    Default

    As you can see in my recent post, there are problems with 45 in a 460 - sticking brass. After 30 minutes of brass brushing the cylinder, the goop is still in the gun.

    NEVER AGAIN.

    I'm giving the last of my .45 long Colt "cowboy loads" to a friend.

    If I ever get the crap out of the cylinders, I'll shoot only .460 from here on.

    I chose the .460 because of the versitility to shoot different ammo. Should have bought a .500.

    S&W ought to warn their customers about this problem. So should the gun shops.

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,429

    Default

    I contend it is strickly a cleaning issue. The difficulty comes from really dirty loads in the 45 Colt. The wrong powder or wrong bullet that causes leading in the cylinder, that is what is so hard to get out. I have shot a lot of 45 Colt in the 454 and most of the problem is from the oversized throat (actually the cylinder of the longer caliber) allows the bullet base to be deposited on the cylinder wall. If you have trouble cleaning the cylinder it is probably lead on the cylinder.

    If shooting cast, gas checks help a lot. Normally we want the cast bullet to be sized to fit the actual cylinder throats but that cannot be with the open cylinder for the bullet to jump into. Hot gas then gets past the bulletburns off a layer of lead and sticks it on the cylinder wall. Mild loads or jacketed or at least gas checked bullets that are cast very hard will help eliminate the problem. Also dirty powder helps to make more of a mess. H110, W296, 2400, Unique, AA#9, all good powders for the 45 Colt are pretty dirty. Vihta N110 is about the same as 2400 in burn rate and N105 slightly faster. Both work fine in the Colt and are much cleaner. Also moderate doses of Blue Dot work well for a cleaner load.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Murphy,

    How does one get the lead out of the cylinder? I brushed with a brass brush and Outer's Nitro solvent for a about two minutes per hole, and the stuff is still in there.

    Any thoughts on this?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •