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Thread: Pak Canoe

  1. #1
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    Default Pak Canoe

    Any other Pak-Canoe users out there?

    I use a 170 and it's a heck of a boat. Cheap to take on a flight and capable of being soloed effectively. Has enough capacity to haul me, my gear and a de-boned moose.

    I find the Pak as good as a hard shell in use. Better in some ways as it's flexibility can be an asset. For example the thing will bend when going over a souse hole and the ends will often flex out of the water flexing the boat out of stuff that would swamp our Old Town Tripper.

  2. #2

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    i have a pak boat as well. like all canoes, they are good at what they are good at and not so good when their weaknesses are tested.

    i've used my pak boat on some moderate whitewater and it bends through the holes and waves as you say.

    but......the will "hole" easily on sharp rocks. i recently went into the charlie with it and now i have more patches on the thing then lil' abners cover-alls. another pak boat on the same trip suffered the same fate.

    they stand up well to rounded stream/river tumbled rocks. but, good grief they are horrible on sharp "freshly" broken rocks.

    a ***much*** better boat is the inflatable made by grabner. but, one has to reconcile the notion of it being a "real" canoe vs. it being a skinny raft.

    i'm still looking for a royalex-bolt-together-hardshell.... may have to try and build one myself.

    -g

  3. #3

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    Yes, my experience with an Ally canoe echos that of gulkana (above). In addition to sharp rocks, I've had my share of problems with sharp stobs on downed trees and snags in the rivers. That said, I've greatly enjoyed trips with the Ally, and especially appreciated its portability. My most memorable uses were a series of floats and a fair amount of lake paddling done in S. America on an extended trout fishing trip.

  4. #4
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Ally canoe...

    Ally canoes are incredible. I have used my 16.5' Ally on two arctic rivers in NW Alaska and the Goodnews in SW. The NW rivers are about 125 miles above the arctic circle. Great flly fishing for dollies and grayling. All gravel of course, and the Ally still looks nearly brand new. Got about 30 days river time total on it. What an amazing canoe. I got one small 1.5" gash from a sharp rock on our trip in SW Alaska last year. Easily repaired while we stopped for lunch. Drug this thing over more gravel bars than I can count. Very durable material this Tarpulon. A lightweight version of the Hypalon used in Zodiac rafts. I have lots of pictures of mine in the below link. We have had over 800 lbs in it with no problems. Naturally, it handles better with lighter loads. For remote float trips in Alaska, this is the ticket. Anything class III or above, a raft would be best. Unless you can portage easily. While the Ally is capable of running white water, the stakes are high on remote trips. I recently bought a Sotar 14.5' raft for some rivers in NE Alaska. Namely the Kongakut, Hula Hula, and Jago. But for all class I/II rivers or easily portaged/lined class III stretches, an Ally canoe is an obvious choice. When the below link opens, click "view slideshow" in the upper right side of the page. Lots of Ally canoe pics in this album that is a mix of our recent float trips. Three trips in NW Alaska and one in SW Alaska. If you want to see a full screen image, don't do the slideshow, click on the individual picture, then click "all sizes" which is listed on top of the picture. Then you can open a large or original file which will be full screen.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/2114408...7603727567944/

    http://allycanoes.com/
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  5. #5
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    I've used Pak 150 with solo and double frames for 10 years. It feels and travels like a canoe .... surprisingly firm and stable once you get it in the water. I've done four 10 day river trips on north and south slopes of NE Brooks Range ... and many interior alaska 2-3 day trips. Alot of bruises but no cuts that required repair in the field. I paddle, yak and row it as the occasion presents itself ... and luv it. I pack extremely light weight. I'm glad i didn't take it on the Charley ... even after two positive PackBoat reports from more skilled canoers than I. Two paddlers friends who loaded extremely heavy told me they wouldn't take the Pak 170 on the Canning R during a low water stage again.

    Do your homework before you canoe. It's a great design for class I-III rounded rock rivers that you don't need to portage kitchen sinks and moose hind quarters. Don't take it on the Atigun River like waters ( ... read that sharp rocks.) Bought a Aire Super Lynx this summer for those types of rivers ... but didn't end up trying her out. Maybe next summer!

  6. #6
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    I use my 170 Solo and have not met any sharp rock rivers yet. It's been a great rig. I'll likely buy another. Nice advice on sharp rocks...never thought about that but i can see how that would be a problem.

  7. #7

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    as mentioned before i have a pakboat. for what i want this type of boat for, i wouldn't buy another one. i want a boat that i can place into a helio or supercub and run class 2/3 rivers in the middle of no-where without having to worry about making it out. when i bought my pakboat i was concerned about how tough they would be. not tough enuf for me is the answer that i have come to.

    i have seen the grabner boats used on very abusive rivers. anything short of royalex can be holed. (and, i suppose its even possible, somehow, to hole a royalex boat...) but, while watching, and experiencing, pakboats getting torn-up on sharp rocks, i've seen a grabner go through the same waterways without even a scratch.

    these boats are built EXTREMELY tough. they are made in austria—really, they are made there—not in some chinese sweatshop. the quality of workmanship is what you would expect. (you know, the way we used to make things in the USA.) they carry far more gear/weight than a pakboat and are even self-bailing. (if you a canoe purist i would agree that they are really CSOs—canoe shapped objects, ie, a skinny raft.)

    http://www.grabner-sports.at/_old/index.php?id=17&L=2

    i know there is a dealer in fairbanks who sells them. can't remember the name of the place—he's in the little strip mall west of the original fred meyers. mountain sports, or something like that. i don't know if there is an anchorage dealer or not. i'm sure if you emailed grabner they could provide the info.

    this summer i'm going to cleanup my pakboat as well as i can and sell the thing for a couple hundred, then buy a grabner "adventure".

  8. #8
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    Mountain Sports 474-4600.

    We bought a Grabner Outside from him. That was the "other" boat on the Canning River trip that was rough on the Pakboat 170. The Outside is expensive and "tough as nails" ... but more kayak than canoe. It was also very "tippee" in the wind or when loaded heavy. The paddlers went swimming twice ... while the Pakboat 170 paddlers were high and dry. My Pakboat 150 is a keeper "canoe in a bag." I'm not looking back. Great for its intended purpose. If starting over again I'd look seriously at the Adventure for more Alaska versatility ... however it does looks less canoe-like in handling. Hopefully i'm wrong.

  9. #9
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Try out a boat day

    I oft times wish we could have a pool or pond set up at the sports show in Anchorage.
    Its still to early in the season for the lakes to be open, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to actually get into a craft for a minute and see how is fits our individual needs before we make the investment?
    Last year we had the Forum float trip down the Kenai river in May..
    It was great, but what I would like to see is a place we can all just show up and try out like 10 or more different canoes and kayaks etc..
    Any ideas?
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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  11. #11
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    I oft times wish we could have a pool or pond set up at the sports show in Anchorage.
    Its still to early in the season for the lakes to be open, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to actually get into a craft for a minute and see how is fits our individual needs before we make the investment?
    Last year we had the Forum float trip down the Kenai river in May..
    It was great, but what I would like to see is a place we can all just show up and try out like 10 or more different canoes and kayaks etc..
    Any ideas?
    Max
    I had made a suggestion in another thead about having a rondezvous or Ron-Day-Voo for a get together where different forks taught different class that they were experts in, fire starting, survival, etc. Your idea would be something great to add into it.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  12. #12
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    Default VERY cool sail-canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by JimLuckett View Post
    That has to be the shortest, and the very coolest first post I've every seen on this board.

    Very nice craft. Loved the combo daggerboards/outriggers, how close the mast is to the bow (right there), the "rudders", and you just don't need any main sheet traveler when that function is being done by a human, do you?

    I also liked that the camera-boat was identical to the shoot-boat; I figure you didn't want any dumb engine noises going on, and plus its always more fun to work as a father/son team, eh?

    Thanks for sharing that. Again, very cool boat.

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