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Thread: Reloading your own ammo.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Default Reloading your own ammo.

    I am starting to get interested in loading my own ammo. I was curious what peoples thoughts are on the difficulty of loading your own ammo. I know everyone has to start somewhere and i was wondering if anyone had any tips or pointers for me, Thank you

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    Member AKRoadkill's Avatar
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    Read a loading manual or two first, that'll give you a lot of valuable info and an idea of what everyone's talking about when they answer your questions. NEVER take shortcuts, NEVER start with max loads. Always double check your powder type and weight. do everything the same for every round of ammo. But first, read the loading manuals...not necessarily the load data for each cartridge, but the how-to stuff in the front.

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    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Reloading is easy once you get the hang of it. It is about as easy as tying flies. Get the tools and materials out and build.

    Tips....keep things organised each load is a recipe which must be followed the same each time.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    thanks for input, i will be looking for some manuals

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    Hoose35 -

    Get the Nosler 6 manual or the latest Sierra manual. Both are great manuals with the basics or reloading and fantastic loads for your rifles.

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Get a copy of the ABCs of Reloading. Read it and keep it for a reference.

    You'll also want more than one reloading manual from the bullet and powder manufacturers especially if you're switching powders from one brand to another.

    I would suggest getting both the Lyman and Hodgdon manuals starting off as they list loads for several powders from different manufacturers.
    Now what ?

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    Keep records. As said, do a lot of reading. Don't smoke or reload around a space heater. It is really not too difficult at all.
    I basically taught myself by just reading books. How I ever managed before the Internet is a mystery to me. LOL.
    Are you going to start with rifle and pistol? Pistol is a little less labor intensive as you don't need to worry much about trimming after repeated sizing which causes case stretch.
    I prefer to start with new brass when it comes to rifle cases as there is no nasty factory crimp on hte mouth to mess with.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    I would be starting with rifles, it is the only kind of guns I own. Thanks again for the replies, it has been very helpful

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    Member AKPacker's Avatar
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    I just got into reloading a little over a year ago, I started out with this manual, its full of good info for beginners (I think they've got the 49th edition out now too). I also have the Speer and Lee reloading manuals. I'd highly recommend the Speer one, the Lee isn't quite as good in my opinion.

    After I'd read the manuals through and through, I got this kit, which includes everything you'll need to start reloading but a set of dies.

    Reloading is really quite easy, as long as you're extremely thorough and double or triple check everything as you're beginning as others have said. Its nice to be able to roll your own ammo for half the cost or less of the factory loaded stuff.
    Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for.

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    Been casting bullets and reloading my own since I was 12. Taught my son had to load his own at age 10. Neither of us ever shot an animal with a factory round other than .22 rimfire.
    It is as easy as waking up. But if you do not pay attention to what you are doing you can screw it up and cause harm to yourself and others around you and destroy your weapons. Buy the books and read and never take anything for granted and you will do fine.

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    it's important to know that powder by mfg can be quite different even though they have the same name. (example h4831--imr4831).

    with dies, generally it's best to full length resize. that way your cartridges will fit all rifles in that caliber. if you only use one rifle, neck sizing may be more accurate (and certainly faster). i use spray on case lube (hornady one shot), and find that a lot less messy to use.

    you can save a lot of money by buying stuff on ebay....this includes loading manuals, dies, press, powder measures and scales. just decide what you want....check current prices, then bid.

    good luck!
    jh

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    But if you do not pay attention to what you are doing you can screw it up and cause harm to yourself and others around you and destroy your weapons. Buy the books and read and never take anything for granted and you will do fine.
    Absolute attention is a practice that must be developed from the get go, be alot of trial and error in setting up dies at the start-nothing you cannot overcome. It is not cheap getting into reloading but the end result of doing a "tailor" made to rifle that shoots extremely well and something you can build when factory fodder that you once shot is not available anymore is rewarding.

    I did not have the internet when I first started nor anyones help close by-lots of reading and careful attention and a patient wife

    be safe and have fun

  13. #13

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    I've been reloading for 35 years and if asked suggest that a beginner start with 3 manuals (one from bullet maker, one from powder maker and one from an equipment maker). DO NOT EXPECT THEIR DATA TO MATCH. It won't. Try to find someone in your area that reloads that can help show you how to set up the equipment and get you started. Make sure that you have the correct powder for the load you are working with since there are several with the same number but each manufactorer has a different burn rate.

    Good luck and have fun.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    anyone reloading .338 or .50ae, or 5.7x28?
    Semper Fi!

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Some good advice I've always followed is if you are unsure of the load source start 10% UNDER the load listed. This goes double if you get the load from the Internet!

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