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Thread: Goat Success!

  1. #1
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    Default Goat Success!

    Don't know if I'll get all of this posted right now but I'll get started.

    I am admittedly a tight-lipped hunter when it comes to 'over-the-counter' hunting areas. However, when it comes to hard-to-obtain permits, I know that I would appreciate any information from others, so I figured I would share my DG866 Goat success.

    We (my dad and I) flew in on Thursday afternoon, doing a general scout of the area on our way. We saw a handful of sheep and goats, as well as quite a few black bear. When we landed, I immediately spotted 3 rams accross the valley from us, which was about 400 yards. Two of them were 3/4 curls and one was a nice double broomed ram that looked to be about 10.5 years old. They hung out for the rest of the day as we set up camp- why can't I be this lucky during sheep season! From camp we glassed 4 goats above us, 2 of which looked to be billys, 4 about a mile up river, which seemed to be 2 nannies and 2 kids, and 3 more beyond them, which was a nanny and twins. We also saw 5 different black bears. We turned in with clear skies above us and 30 degrees.

    The next day we got up and glassed all morning, seeing a number of animals but nothing that was in huntable terrain. Goats in the chugach truly live in goat country. The snow wasn't deterring the goats at all and they stayed in humanly unreachable country all afternoon. We were waiting on a group to hopefully feed down to an accessible location, but they seemed content to stay perched above their world. Friday ended with a game plan of going after a group 3 miles up river that seemed to be at a bit lower elevation than the ones closer to camp.

    looking up the valley and some rams(they're hard to see, I didn't zoom in).
    Last edited by sockeye1; 01-20-2009 at 07:49.

  2. #2
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    Default Saturday

    Saturday morning we woke up to a hard frost and 27 degrees. After coffee and breakfast we loaded up our packs and headed up the valley. After a relatively easy mile or so we stopped and glassed a group of 4 goats another 1.5 miles beyond us. One appeared to be a nanny and 2 seemed like 2 year old kids. The fourth goat sure looked like a large bodied billy, but I have read that big billies usually don't hang out with nanny's and kids. The only other goat hunt I have done was on kodiak and the billy I harvested was with 2 other billies. Anyway, just to be safe we hugged one side of the river valley so we would be concealed. when we were about a half mile away from the goats, I glassed them again and there was no question that there was a heavy horned-billy in the group. We made our way up a large, steep snowslide and onto an alder/willow/grass/frosty/slick/nasty mountainside that was absolutely the worst terrain I've ever hiked in. Although I never really got worn out and it was only an 1800' elevation gain from the river bottom, it was very humbling terrain.

    So we finally make it up to the elevation of the goats and we're still a half mile away so we slowly start skirting the mountainside towards them. The last time I glassed them I took a pic of the four animals. The first is of the nanny, which is the highest in the pic, my billy and then the 2 kids are on the bottom. The second is zoomed in- sorry, its just a small, packable canon camera.
    Last edited by sockeye1; 01-20-2009 at 07:49.

  3. #3
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Default OK, Got my attention

    Fill the holes in this story

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    Default Wrap-up

    We sat at the location of that last pic for over 4 hours hoping the billy would feed into a better location. He eventually got up and moved down a little, enough so we felt comfortable putting a final stalk on him. We moved towards him and managed to stay concealed until he was about 400 yards away. As he began to get nervous I found a solid, but uncomfortable rest on the side of the mountain. My dad and I had just had the discussion of what he would do after being hit. He claimed he would go downhill and I bet he would try and go up with the other goats. I held just over his back on the first shot and at the report my dad confirmed a solid hit in the vitals. The goat was clearly hit and staggered sideways, but regained his form and took a few jumps up the mountain. I quickly jacked in another shell and put the cross-airs in the same location. He stumbled sideways after he was hit again and staggered to the edge of the spire he had been on. I swear that he actually kicked himself off the edge, and tumbled about 200 feet before he slid to a stop in a scree slide.

    His final measurements are 9 1/2" horns and 5 3/4" bases, he scores 50 1/2 b&c points, which puts him 1/2" in the record book. I won't worry about putting him in, but it was neat to find out he was such a nice billy. I haven't decided if I am going to rug him or life-size him...time and finances will tell.

    I put the new sitka ascent pants to the test and they performed flawlessly- we'll see how they hold up on Kodiak in a few weeks.

    Rifle was a Tikka T3 LH .270 with fed premium 130gr btsp and the pack was the barney's pinnacle- this is beyond the best pack I've ever brought a load out in!!!

    All in all, the best part of the hunt was being with my dad. He's 58 and still in reasonable shape, but I know our hunts together are limited- especially mountain type hunts. To all of you out there with kids (I have a 16 month old daughter that I hope to take out someday) get them out as much as you can.
    Last edited by sockeye1; 01-20-2009 at 07:49.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Good stuff - thanks for sharing! I'm heading out after my sheep with bow in hand this weekend, so hopefully I'll see some close by just like you did. Even the small white dots in that second picture get me excited. There's just nothing like mountain hunting, is there?

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    congrats dude,thats badd azz!

  7. #7
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Nice Billy

    Congrats on your Billy, Did he bust a horn on the fall ? or do you just like holding him that way? seems like billies like to get back at the hunter by mangeling their face and head gear.

  8. #8

    Default Congrats!

    Nice job Sockeye! Very nice goat. I haven't killed one in a long time. You given me the inspiration to get a goat!

  9. #9
    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    VERY nice Goat ! Congrats. Its been exactly one year to the day since I shot my first Goat. It wasn't easy. I can't wait to get back out and get another one next year (?)
    Johnny

  10. #10
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Sockeye,

    So glad you were able to get out hunting with your dad. Can't buy memories like that. Congrats on the goat; thanks for the pics and story.

  11. #11
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default wonderful

    That is the one thing that I miss is being able to go with my dad. Makes the whole thing worht it. The two of you are to be congradulated on a wonderful success.

  12. #12
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    Default I hear you

    On that one my dad came up here moose hunting this past month it was a blast he had the time of his life he didn't get to shoot one but saw another friend of ours shoot one spike/fork he was grinning ear to ear since he has never seen a dead moose before and was shocked at how big they were. Again if you have kids take them hunting I have pictures of my daughter was 1 1/2 yrs old bouncing around in the truck hunting couse deer in Arizona with me granted didn't do much hiking that day. She is counting down when she can legally hunt and to top it off she asked me the other week Dad when you going to buy me a gun music for any dad's ears.

  13. #13
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    Default

    He did bust his skull in the fall, which I think eliminates him from actually going in 'the book', but his face is in great shape (other than being bloody in the pic), and my Taxidermist said the skull will be a piece of cake fixing- horns are both in-tact. Gonna get him tanned and then probably freeze him until I decide what to do...

  14. #14

    Default Thank you.....

    for taking the time to post the pics and tell the story. Some of the adventures are better than the magazine stories. You'll have great memories there to last a lifetime.
    Also thanks for the rifle/caliber/bullet info and the Barney report.

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