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Thread: Are Moose really that smart?

  1. #1
    Member REMF's Avatar
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    Default Are Moose really that smart?

    Was in area 14 today looking for bears, glassing hillsides and so on, it’s the same area I moose hunt. Saw plenty of moose this year, usually early in the AM then dead after the first few hours.

    Well here is the smart moose part, while glassing a far hillside, much farther than I should have I see movement, can hardly make it out with the binos, then there’s another and another and another and so on, these animals were in the wide open hillside at 2pm. I thought they might be caribou since there was so many. Got out the (crappy) spotting scope, there were moose 34 of them to be exact all in 1 group. I could make out 1 very large bull and that was about it, and they were all accessible from a trail.

    Back to the question, are moose really that smart?

  2. #2

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    Nope. But they have very good instincts. Not as good as the rest of the deer species though. They are the easiest game animal to hunt that I have tried for.

  3. #3
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    Default

    They always seem to be in the open after hunting season.

  4. #4
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    Default I wouldn't say it has anything to do with smarts

    I also don't think it has anything to do with hunting seasons.

    The season closes for a reason on the 20th. To keep from interupting the breeding cycle when their senses are distracted.

    Just like any guy here when your in the rut your on a one way thinking cylcle.

    I wouldn't call it dumb I would call it instincts.

    How many big bulls are killed in areas that are no secret like Puritan Creek??

    Not many because they are in recluse mode. Go up now and this whole week. Bet you find many big bulls. They didn't just drop from the sky.

  5. #5
    Member 379 Peterbilt's Avatar
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    Default

    They are smarter than many folks make them out to be, imo.

    Ask a moose biologist who deals with captive moose for a living, and he'll say the same thing.

  6. #6
    Member REMF's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 375ultramag View Post
    Just like any guy here when your in the rut your on a one way thinking cylcle.
    LOL so you are saying we are ALWAYS out of our thinking cycle?

  7. #7
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    Pretty much REMF

    Think of it this way. Spike forks are an easy kill and so is a 35" paddle head.

    Go find the 55 or 65" bull.

    How many of those did you see with a 4 wheeler this year?

    We all know where they are. Up high by the rocks out of range that most are willing to pack.

    Then the 20th rolls around and by the 25th them suckers are down where you were hunting.

    They are hunting too. Just a little different style.

    That is my opinion. I will be up hiking tomorrow with the video hoping to call in some bulls for fun or get in the middle of a herd of cows and tick off a bull .

    If I can get some good video I will share it.

    I will also be trying to do my part in finding some 4 legged moose eating mongrals as well. Black, Brown or Grey

  8. #8
    Member ratlmn's Avatar
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    Default

    The evening before bow season a few years ago I had set up camp and was settled in glassing the ridge when a 40" bull came out and fed around me for a while. Larter, off in the distance I could hear a 4wheeler headed my way on the trail, the bull slowlly worked his way back into the timber and disappeared before the wheeler appeared. The Guy stopped by my camp, and we BS'd a while and then he continued down the trail. Shortly after the wheeler was gone the Bull came back out and continued to feed.I think they have a good idea of whats going on. BTW he also had 3 brow tines, I arrowed him the next evening. Guess he should've been more leery of a parked 4 wheeler then a moving one.........He fed my family for the winter.

  9. #9

    Default agreed

    I grunted in a bull this year that was momentarily fooled by a decoy. Still, he would come no closer than 250 yards. Then he disappeared. Soon, I realized he was circling to get downwind of me, so I moved to head him off a bit. He still came no closer than 200 yards, and every step I took, he would look right toward me------with those large ears and antlers, they pretty much have a biological megaphone. I finally decided he was legal and that ended that. I've bugled in many elk, but this bull moose came in more warily than any elk I've called. Granted it may have been a bit premature for the heavy rut, but I was impressed by his caution----especially considering we were in a low pressured area. He ended up being 56 inches with a whole heck of a lot of good meat.

  10. #10
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default cagey

    I talked to quite a few bulls this year, mostly in the Palmer area, and have a new respect for them. Its incredible how quiet they can be when they want, and how wary they truly are. Their size betrays them sometimes, making it seem like an easy game. We called in many animals that we never saw, because we couldnt' pull them into an opening.

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