Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: DYI or Shop Winterization?

  1. #1

    Default DYI or Shop Winterization?

    Do you all like to do the winterization of your outboards yourself, or do you have it done by a shop?

    I have a Yamaha 40hp, and 4ph kicker. Last year (first year with boat) I had it done at the shop, and had a bad experience. On both motors, they didn't tighten the gear oil drain screws well enough. On the kicker, the drain screw was so loose, that I could literly tighten it with the tip of my finger. I noticed the problem because oil was leaking out! When I brought it to the attention of the guy at the shop, he acted like it was no big deal, and just walked away! Well, I'm in Juneau, so I guess they know we have few choices.

    I just don't want to mess up the motor by doing it myself, but I have little faith in the shop. Maybe I'll just have to take it to another shop...

    What do you all do and recomend?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    There is no reason you cannot do it yourself. In fact, I will be doing mine this weekend. (Twin F250's & F4) I just drain the upper and lower lube and replace, remove spark plugs and spray fogging oil into cylinders, and bump ignition to coat cylinders. Some people stabilize their fuel, I usually don't. Take the money you save and take your wife or significant other out to a nice dinner, take a picture, and send it to the service manager of the service center that lost out on your business.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    There is no reason you cannot do it yourself. In fact, I will be doing mine this weekend. (Twin F250's & F4) I just drain the upper and lower lube and replace, remove spark plugs and spray fogging oil into cylinders, and bump ignition to coat cylinders. Some people stabilize their fuel, I usually don't. Take the money you save and take your wife or significant other out to a nice dinner, take a picture, and send it to the service manager of the service center that lost out on your business.
    Is that all there is to it? Do I have to run the motors with the new oil at all, or can I just replace it, and be done with it?

    Also, how do you make sure you have all of the water out of the system? Is it safe to say that by letting the motors hang vertical, the water should be all drained out?

    Thanks, and thats a great idea with the picture!

  4. #4
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,292

    Default Ruger01

    When you change the gear oil and replace it you are done, no need to run. I suppose you could turn the motor once you have the spark plugs out. Once you spray fogging oil into cylinders, I usually just turn them by hand or use the cord. If you turn on the engines it will spit out the oil. I pray a good burst, turn by hand. Spray until the cylinders are almost full. One can of fogging oil should be good to do both motors. Then put the plugs back in. JUST REMEMBER IN SPRING TO PULL PLUGS AND PUMP THE OIL OUT BY TURNING THE MOTORS OVER AND HANG A RAG OVER THE HOLES TO CATCH THE OIL, I will use the cord and pull real slow to catch majority of the oil Then hit keys and make sure all the rest is out. If you don't you can blow your heads or seals. Then you are good to go. I drain my lower units in the spring, check for water or anything that looks funny now though. Also change engine oil in spring too. There is a chance you can get moisture in your oils when we have the drastic temps in winter. So I just do it all in the spring. Once you do the fogging oil, I spray the entire motor with a silicone spray, yamaha brand. Keeps the carbs looking new and moving freely. Not to mention you still take my cowlings off the insides are beautiful. Then if you are afraid of moisture still in the lines you can put an air hose up to the P-hole and give soft bursts.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    273

    Default Winterizing

    There is no reason to fill the cylinders with fogging oil, just coat the cylinder walls, piston at bottom dead center and spray in all directions, then crank the engine. The point of the fogging oil is it leaves a coating on the walls of the cylinders and prevents corrosion from forming on the rings and cylinder walls. If you have a two stroke you need to run the engine while spraying fogging oil into the carbs, spray until engine is smoking a bit and move on to the next carb, then pull the plugs and do the cylinders. Drain and fill the lower unit (some do it both fall and spring, I don't). If it is a fourstroke just change the oil, fog the cylinders with the plugs out, crank the engines, spray some on the plugs and re-install. Draining the carbs is also a good idea as the fuel can leave a bit of varnish, but if you will have it out and run up by may 1st, I wouldn't worry about it too much.

    Also, fill the fuel tanks or leave empty.

    Spring - remove old plugs, throw in trash. Install new plugs, pump bubble, turn on hose with flush cups, start engine, run till warm, then take to water and go test under power, if all is well continue out to fishing grounds, catch first fish of year, drink beer, and go back and tell wife it wasn't quite right so you may have to make a few adjustments and try again tomorrow. Repeat last step for three to four months, then start at beginning of thread again.

    chris

  6. #6

    Default stabilizer & drain carbs

    1. full fuel tank with stabilizer added
    2. run stabilized fuel long enough to make it through the water separator and engine.
    3. kill engine by spraying fogging oil into carb intakes until it dies.
    4. drain carb bowls of fuel.
    5. fogg cylinders and crank a few times to spread.
    6. top off the tank to get rid of all air to prevent condensation.
    7. add "iso heat" to fuel tank.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    183

    Default Don't forget the battery

    I always remove the battey and place it on a shelf or on some wood and store it fully charged or if you have an automatic charger leave it on trickle.
    Tito's advice is what I have done for years and it has worked fine.

  8. #8

    Default Thanks

    Thanks, everyone for the info. I'll definately be doing it myself. I've been changing my own oils, but wasn't sure if there was something special to do with the fogger.

    Seems pretty cut and dry.

    Thanks!

  9. #9
    Member Stanly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    954

    Default Fogging?

    I was a dealer in Anchorage (where I bought my boat last year). I have a 115/90 Yamaha 4 Stroke. I mentioned to the guy in the shop that I was going to fog my motor and he said that you should not fog a 4 stroke. He was pretty adament about it. He said to change the oil, run some stabil through it and thats all. I told him that I always put stabil in all of my tanks and he said to not even worry about it. This guy sets up their boats and has been around for a while. Your thoughts...

  10. #10
    Member GOT TOYS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    118

    Default Winterize

    I winterize my four strokes by changing oil and lower unit grease. I have never fogged an engine, and I've owned many sleds, wheelers, boats, etc., and never had any problems because of it. Just for kicks, several times I've peered in the cylinders, just to see a nice shiney wall. As many internal combustion engines as I have, it would break the bank to do everything "recommended". Also, I've never had a problem with gasoline refined in Alaska. I've never used Stabil, still have sample packets sent with chainsaws, etc. I do toss a couple cans of Sea Foam in my fuel tank in the spring, along with a little isopropanol during the summer.
    I also leave may batteries in the boat, hooked up with the switch off. Put a trickle charge on them a couple times a winter. They are 4 years old, and I will change them after next season, just because. Also, setting modern batteries on cement doesn't hurt them. Wive's tale.
    Disclaimer: This is the way I do it. You can do as your manual says if you want.

  11. #11
    Member f0zzy2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    374

    Default trim cylinder

    I unscew the fill cap on my trim cylinder. One year I must have had some moisture in it, and it froze and cracked. $325 for a new cylinder! owch.....

  12. #12
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stanly View Post
    I was a dealer in Anchorage (where I bought my boat last year). I have a 115/90 Yamaha 4 Stroke. I mentioned to the guy in the shop that I was going to fog my motor and he said that you should not fog a 4 stroke. He was pretty adament about it. He said to change the oil, run some stabil through it and thats all. I told him that I always put stabil in all of my tanks and he said to not even worry about it. This guy sets up their boats and has been around for a while. Your thoughts...
    Dewey's will tell you to just put the fogging oil in the gas with the stabil and then run then both through motor for 20 minutes. Then change the oils and call it a season. Thats what they told me they do.
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  13. #13
    Member breausaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Down and dirty, my routine:
    Single carbonated Honda 90

    Installing new plugs
    Change oil on power head and lower unit
    Disconnect fuel line and run gas out of the motor
    Pull the drain plugs on carb bowls to get the rest, re-install
    Fuel tanks are always topped off, donít use Stabil
    Elevate the bilge pump so itís high and dry
    Pump the water tank dry
    Leave batteries onboard plugged into battery tender
    Have never used a fogger

    In the spring:
    Crank over the motor a few time to lube things
    Connect fuel; pump er up, run engine a bit
    Change out the Racor
    Reinstall bilge pump and check

    The little tender kicker gets the same treatment.
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •