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Thread: Broadhead Tuning

  1. #1

    Question Broadhead Tuning

    I purchased a new Parker bow last year that I have not hunted with yet. The bow has proven itself to be accurate with field points, but I just tried shooting broadheads with it and the arrows are flying everywhere but straight. They are very erratic and hit all over the target, even at short distances. The broadheads are the same weight as the field tips. Does anybody have any ideas that I can try to get the arrows at least flying consistently? Should I take it in to the experts, since I know next to nothing about bows? I'm going sheep hunting next week and I need to get this thing in shape!

    FYI, I'm shooting 60 or 65 pounds with carbon arrows and 125 grain Thunder Head broadheads.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Paul has a broadhead target in at the Archer's Den and might be able to help you out.

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    Default Eastons Tuning guide

    Also look up Eastons Tuning guide on the internet - great resource. There are so many factors involved in broadhead tuning - it can be a daunting task. Quality arrows and broadheads are very important. A lot of people pay $1200 for a new bow, rest, sight, quiver, release, and then buy cheap arrows and broadheads.

    Another option, depending on what you are hunting, is to buy a quality mechanical broadhead. They will fly right with your field tips. But, they are not a replacement for tuning.

    Good luck,

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    Default What broadheads are you using?

    Have you weighed each of your broadheads and total arrow weight with each of the broadheads installed? The broadhead weights and total arrow weights should be within a couple of grains. All of my broadheads are usually within 1 grain of the advertised weight.

    Have you spin tested them?

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    Default Broadheads

    I have 100 grains Hell Razors, and it seemed like they flew better than field points.

    I have a Bowtech Guardian, 70 lb, 29" draw, shooting Carbon Express 340 Maximas.

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    Default Broadhead's

    It is interesting thst your Thounderhead 125 flew inconsistant. I shot a Bowtech and I "used" to shoot the Thunderhead 125's and at 40 yards they flew all over the place. A friend gave me a Magnus Shuffer SS 125 to try and it shots as straight as my field points. I thought it might just be me so I shot both broadheads several days in a row and the Thunderheads never flew consistantly the same, so I have switched to the Magnus.

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks a lot for all of the information, guys. Since I'm pretty green with the whole archery thing I think I'll just go visit Paul at the Archer's Den and see if he can set me up. Maybe he has different types of broadheads that I can try out.

    On another note, I just shot my first Robin Hood tonight! Guess I'll need to buy a couple more arrows from Paul, too!

  8. #8

    Default This is just my opinion............

    but the first thing I'd do is throw the TH's away. I've only seen a handful of bows that will shoot them. If a fella has one of these bows they shoot great.....otherwise they do just what you're describing. I personally shoot muzzy 4 blade, but there many great broadheads available today.
    Good Luck.
    Sarge
    RIDE TALL, SHOOT STRAIGHT AND ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH

  9. #9

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    I had a hard time with the TH's as well, but eventually got them shooting w/ my field points. The TH's have a bigger diameter then most and will tend to plane more. You need to be shooting arrows with helical vanes, or vanes big enough to control the broadhed. I was shooting Goldtip pro hunters w/ the factory vanes. After nothing but problems and retuning and retuning my bow, I removed the vanes and installed blazer vanes with a good helical to them and my problems went away. You should still spin test the TH's when you install them and just get them snug on the o-ring, over tightening on the o-ring seemed to make it wobble a bit. I also try to line the blades to the vanes for consistancy.
    I hear a lot of good things about the Muzzy's and Slick Tricks and will probably switch to them next year. Each has a smaller cutting diameter and should be easier for you to tune.
    Let us know how things work out.

  10. #10
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    Default Agreed

    I agree with the others. If your bow is properly tuned it will shoot any "properly assembled" arrow to the same point of impact as field points.

    I quit on Thunderheads years ago. My mainstay now are Magnus Snuffer SS 125's and Slick Tricks depending on the species. Moose and bears get the Magnus and the other species I hunt get the ST's. Both are real reliable broadheads and fly extremely well.

    BUT, the arrows need to be correctly assembled too. A poorly assembled insert with a chunk of epoxy laying on one side of the inside of the shaft is going to affect flight as well as an insert out of alignment. My last batch of store bought arrows, only 75% were perfect enough for hunting with bh's. The others became my 20 yard inside target arrows.

    There are many more reliable and good quality broadheads out there today than when I started bow hunting in 1963.

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    Have you considered mechanical broadheads?

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    Default Thunder Heads

    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkman View Post
    I was shooting Goldtip pro hunters w/ the factory vanes.
    These are the arrows I'm shooting, also with factory vanes. There seem to be quite a few folks that had trouble getting their Thunder Heads to fly right -- glad it's not just me! I've heard a lot of good stuff about Slick Trick's and Magnus broadheads so I might just try one of them.

    Moose-Head: I haven't tried any mechanical broadheads and I have zero experience with them. Do you like them. Any problems with them in cold weather?

  13. #13
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    Default Mechanicals

    Quote Originally Posted by moose-head View Post
    Have you considered mechanical broadheads?
    Mechanicals are illegal on many species of game up here. Warmer weather states maybe. Too many parts = too many problems.

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    Default What they said

    Go with muzzy's ,G-5 I use Wac 'Em Triton Broadheads. Also where I came from down south the proshop had broadhead tuner. They put the arrow on it W/ the broadhead and spin it and you will see the wobble in the arrow with this. If it wobbles then they make adjustment to it. But I use GT pro's hunters, saves alot of headaches to buy top dollar arrows instead of going the cheap route.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Corn View Post
    These are the arrows I'm shooting, also with factory vanes. There seem to be quite a few folks that had trouble getting their Thunder Heads to fly right -- glad it's not just me! I've heard a lot of good stuff about Slick Trick's and Magnus broadheads so I might just try one of them.

    Moose-Head: I haven't tried any mechanical broadheads and I have zero experience with them. Do you like them. Any problems with them in cold weather?
    I also use mechanicals I used the rage 3 blade on a little couse deer talk about some pentration and entry wound holy smokes was very impressed, I sighted my bow in with 100gr field points and then switched to the 100gr mechanicals and went hunting the zero didn't change, it was like I was still shooting the field points. I think you can use mechanicals on caribou and black bear up here need to break the regs out again. The use of mechanicals is one of the most debated things on archery forums. Some love them and most hate them...

  16. #16
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    Default Rage Broadheads

    Be careful with the Rage, at least the 2-blade. Some folks on another thread stated these were completely illegal in AK due to the barb shape when the blades were deployed. I don't know if this is true, or whether ADF&G or AST has "ruled" on this, but you should consider carefully before using them up here.

    Chris

    PS - Slick Tricks! (Magnum or Razor Tricks)

  17. #17
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    Your right almost forgot alot of states have banned the 2 blade rage due to there barb... I know Oregon you can't use them and along with several east coast states as well.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mort View Post
    Be careful with the Rage, at least the 2-blade. Some folks on another thread stated these were completely illegal in AK due to the barb shape when the blades were deployed. I don't know if this is true, or whether ADF&G or AST has "ruled" on this, but you should consider carefully before using them up here.

    Chris

    PS - Slick Tricks! (Magnum or Razor Tricks)
    Link in quote...

  19. #19
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    I have no experience with the mechanicals. I have seen hunting videos where they are used (Jack Brittingham is one of my favorites and he demonstrates excellent broadhead performance on a JUMBO brown bear). I am now in Iowa where they are legal I have always used Muzzy three fixed blade broadheads, but like the idea of mechanicals because they fly like field points, so you dont practice with field points, then switch to broadheads before the season. I will try them on whitetail deer this year.

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    Default tuning...

    If your bow is properly tuned you can get your broad heads to fly like and impact with your field points. Of course that's easy to say, and not so easily done on some bows. Of course if your arrow spine is weak or inconsistent (back the the issue of high-quality arrows again), you are torqueing your bow or have other form errors, or your broad heads out of true then you need to deal with that before tuning will help.

    If your broad head tipped arrows are flying every which way compared to your field points, then it's less likely that you have a pure tuning issue. If your broad heads are hitting consistently to one side (for example low and to the right) then it is most likely going to be dealt with by tuning your bow.

    Of course you can always add more vane and/or helical, and this will help (somewhat), but it will also rob your arrow of energy (speed) as it flies downrange. If you have the time, take the time to learn how to tune your bow. It's worth it (to me) to be able to practice with field points, at home and in hunting camp, and not have to change my sights when I switch back to broadheads. Also, once you learn to tune your bow, you will be able to shoot a wider variety of broad heads, not just the most forgiving ones.

    Mechanicals? Same thing. A band-aid for a poorly tuned bow.

    It takes some time to learn to tune your bow. Get an expert to help you, and watch and listen. Read tuning forums in the internet. Hang out with other people who shoot bows. It's the way most of us learned it. That way, when you your rest comes loose (or something else...it sure to happen!) when you are in the woods you'll stand a chance of correcting it yourself.

    Shoot straight,
    Markus

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