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Thread: Auroro Borealis ???

  1. #1
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    Default Auroro Borealis ???

    What typ of camera would you recomend to a begginer!!

    I work on the slope and see the Norther lights on a regular basis. Just thought it would be cool to shoot some video and picts if possible! Lots of family down south who would love to see the picts!

    I would like to know cost if possible!

    Thanks!
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    I would venture to say you would need a picture camera and not a video camera, but i could be wrong.

    Ray
    Semper Fi!

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    Default I kind of figured that

    I just wanted to leave all options open!!
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    Any camera with a manual mode and a longer shutter speed would be good enough I guess. I don't have any experience in getting shots of the Northern Lights though, none here . Don't forget a good tripod.

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    Member EricL's Avatar
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    Alot depends on what type of quality you are hoping to get. Any body with Manual exposure then a tri-pod, and a cable release will work. The lens is the key. To get great quality you will need more than just the "kit" lens. A nice big aperture of 2.8 or bigger (smaller number) is a great start. Remove any filters you may have and play around with the settings.
    EricL

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    Point & shoot cameras will give you too much digital noise because of the small sensors and long exposures being used. You can use most any digital SLR with generally good results, but Aurora's and night sky shots are one of the reasons why there are people still buying film cameras.

    If you buy a digital SLR, look for one that has low noise. Most Canon's, and some of the upscale new Nikons are usually recommended.

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    That would work, and the price seems fair for an XSi with the two lenses mentioned. Resellerratings.com shows this dealer with a 7.77 ratings. -- http://www.resellerratings.com/store/US1Camera -- Not great, but not bad either. You always want to check out unknown stores there. These two lenses (18-55 IS, and 55-250 IS) are recommended as low cost lenses with fairly good optics. Also they both have a good Image Stabilization feature built in, and that is always a great feature.

    However, you are probably buying some junk in that package. I'm just guessing, but usually when you buy an entry level DSLR in a package deal like this you get a miserable excuse for a tripod, and a bunch of other worthless stuff, like cap keepers, etc. However, you aren't paying much for the miscellaneous junk either. B&H Photo is the largest photo dealer, their prices are good and their policies fair. You should check out the camera & lenses there to find a reasonable and legitimate discount price. With a little shopping you can often beat B&H prices by a little, but any huge discrepancy should start raising flags in your head.

    What you don't have in that package is a large (fast) aperture lens. One with an aperture of f/2. or less. (Smaller number means larger aperture.) Eric L notes that it would be good to have for shooting the Aurora, and he is right. A 20mm to 35mm f/2 lens would be great, but they aren't inexpensive. Canon's 50mm f/1.8 can be had for under $100 though, and it could work, but would give a slightly narrow filed of view. Personally, I would buy that kit, or something like it for now, and practice a little with it. If you determine you need a faster (larger) aperture lens you can buy that later.

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    Default Jim

    Thanks for the advice!
    I will check out B&H photo.

    I want to get a Camera that is a good one that I can add to later!


    The trick will be getting the wife to be OK with it. She's usually cool about that kind of thing but then again I have never wanted a Camera costing over $ 1,000.

    Thanks again for the info guys!
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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