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Thread: Dura-Slick from Crown Plastics

  1. #1
    Member Crumm's Avatar
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    Default Dura-Slick from Crown Plastics

    Just found this on-line while looking for some UHMW for another project. Sounds like the system that Phantom uses on there sport-jon but it is now available to all of us.

    For years, many in the boat industry have been trying to find an effective, affordable way to coat the bottom surfaces of the aluminum boats which can get hung up on rock or gravel bars in shallow streams. The aluminum does not release well and can make navigation more difficult for guides, specifically in the Pacific Northwest. Many have used UHMW in the past, but the mechanical fastening method is very labor intensive and weld washers and bolt heads can still pop loose creating a potential safety issue. In addition, thicknesses range between 1/4” and 1/2” thick adding a lot of extra weight to the boat, possibly as much as 100 pounds.

    By using Crown’s innovative technology for bonding UHMW, a process was developed whereby the UHMW could be epoxied to the boat bottom using a simple vacuum bagging system. Where the typical method for installing sheet would require nearly a full day’s labor, the Dura-Slick boat bottom can be set up and under vacuum bag in roughly 1-1/2 hours. The boat bottom would remain in the vacuum bag for a minimum of 4 hours and the epoxy would need 24 hours to sufficiently cure. The thickness of the UHMW used in the Dura-Slick boat bottom is 3/32” or .093” thick. Since the entire surface of the material is fixed to the boat bottom, there is no warping or buckling of the material due to thermal expansion. Since the thickness of the Dura-Slick product is much thinner than standard sheet, Dura-Slick will only add 20 pounds to the overall weight of the boat.

    This system is currently being utilized by a number of drift boat manufacturers and many more will be coming on board by the end of this year. Crown is now looking to expand this product into the airboat markets in Florida, Louisiana and Alaska and will have product in the field being tested this Spring.

    For information on where you can have Dura-Slick applied to your boat, please call us at 800-368-0238.
    Check it out at - http://www.crownplastics.com/

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    That looks like a pretty slick product.....I wonder what the application cost will be, it should be less than the existing tecnology but I won't hold my breath!

  3. #3
    Member Crumm's Avatar
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    I called them yesterday to see what it cost and if there was anyone applying it in Alaska but the guy I needed to talk to was in a meeting and he never returned my call.

  4. #4
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Hope this isn't a hi-jack

    But, why can't a person paint a brush-on truck bed liner over the bottom of a boat?

  5. #5
    Member Crumm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    But, why can't a person paint a brush-on truck bed liner over the bottom of a boat?
    Will not hold up at all. The first gravel bar you slide across will take most of it right off. The liner will also cause drag when in the water. Guys have tried it and found it to be a very bad idea.

  6. #6
    Member GAredneck's Avatar
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    Default No answer

    I called last week and left a message but haven't gotten a call back yet. Has anyone got a responce from them or know where we can get this in AK?

  7. #7
    Member Crumm's Avatar
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    I also called them and did not get a return call. Sounds like a great product but there customer service is poor

  8. #8
    Member propgrinder's Avatar
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    Default

    I emailed Crown Plastics a while back and they told me there's no one in Alaska that applies the product. The closest one was in Alberta, I think.

  9. #9
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    There are 2 issues here... 1) being slickness or the ability to slide on gravel both UMHW and this Duraslick do the trick... 2)but an impact with a boulder or football sized rock will still do damage. Only thick UMHW like 3/8 plus can distribute the weight of the impact so damage wont occur to your boat.

    You need to decide what you want your boat to be capable of.

  10. #10

    Default If I am reading this right,

    they are using the dura slick to adhere the UMHW to the bottom of the boat right? It isn't a new coating that goes on by itself. It is a new adhesive that allows the UMHW to be put on the boat without all the bolts, etc. that is normally used?

  11. #11
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    It seems to be a new "process" more than anything else. It is a combo of a very thin sheet of UHMW and a new epoxy that bonds it securely to the aluminum hull. I think it will be a significant improvement (if it works) over the old system involving thick sheets of UHMW and a variety of mechanical fastners to attach it to the hull. I do agree that the thicker plastic will provide more impact protection however the main reason I am interested in it is to give me an edge in sliding over the ocasional gravel bar without ading over 100lbs to the belly of my boat!

  12. #12
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by northway View Post
    they are using the dura slick to adhere the UMHW to the bottom of the boat right? It isn't a new coating that goes on by itself. It is a new adhesive that allows the UMHW to be put on the boat without all the bolts, etc. that is normally used?
    No, I think this is used in place of UMHW. They state that it is much thinner than UMHW and only a 20 lb. weight addition as opposed to the 100 or so lbs. when UMHW is applied.

  13. #13
    Member Crumm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    No, I think this is used in place of UMHW.
    It is thin UHMW with a special bonding process.

    The thickness of the UHMW used in the Dura-Slick boat bottom is 3/32” or .093” thick.
    I would like it so I can slide across gravel rather than grind to a halt. My bottom is tough enough for the way I use my boat so thicker UHMW is not needed in my application.

    If we could just get Crown Plastics to return a call now

  14. #14

    Default Crumm

    Look forward to hearing what you find out. Would be worth while to get done on my boat for sure. Having the thinner hulled phantom 20-06, I would surely be interested in getting this done. Thanks for your efforts in finding out the information.

  15. #15
    Member Xerophobic's Avatar
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    "By using Crown’s innovative technology for bonding UHMW, a process was developed whereby the UHMW could be epoxied to the boat bottom using a simple vacuum bagging system. Where the typical method for installing sheet would require nearly a full day’s labor, the Dura-Slick boat bottom can be set up and under vacuum bag in roughly 1-1/2 hours. The boat bottom would remain in the vacuum bag for a minimum of 4 hours and the epoxy would need 24 hours to sufficiently cure. The thickness of the UHMW used in the Dura-Slick boat bottom is 3/32” or .093” thick. Since the entire surface of the material is fixed to the boat bottom, there is no warping or buckling of the material due to thermal expansion. Since the thickness of the Dura-Slick product is much thinner than standard sheet, Dura-Slick will only add 20 pounds to the overall weight of the boat."

    I fail to see what the point of UHMW this thin would be. I often wonder if some of the people who come up with these systems really expect this to hold up with prolonged rough useage. The thickest UHMW on our toughest bottom package is 2 layers thick in the middle and is 1.25" thick!
    3/32" ,while Im sure it may look sweet all nice and vac formed to a hull, isn't going to do squat in the long long term

    Cheers
    Skinny water addict

  16. #16
    Member Limetrude's Avatar
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    Default 3/32 somewhat useful

    I have done a bit of reading on this one and I believe the 3/32" is useful as far as gliding over rough gravel and maintaining your speed without the sudden deceleration when you hit something. Also useful in powering over logs for those of us with heavy loads and go-devils... Using it in this style, there should not be a huge issue with wear and destruction, this is not for airboat use so much as it is a glide over occasional gravel and not get stuck because of the awful sticking action of aluminum on wet rock.

    If you are looking for something to "jump" rocks with, you need IMPACT resistance, not just thin coat of low friction material- hence where the 1/2 inch or more of UHMW becomes desirable.

    I actually have a sample of some 0.060 and 0.090 all conditions adhesive backed UHMW that I ordered to do some testing on and I can see it working much better than the thick stuff as it will flex with the boat hull and have less tendency to delaminate...

    Just my 2 cents... Nifty idea if they can do it for the right price!

  17. #17

    Cool

    The uhmw that phantom and most of the indusry is using comes from linktech in michigan. You can not glue uhmw to anything and make it last! Uhmw is too dense. Linktech has a patented product,it has the uhmw with a fiber glass backing pressed into it making it adherable. The aluminum must be sandblasted and clean and it is very temperature specific to glue on. It is at about 5 lbs. Of vaccuum. You can see it on thunderjets website under new products. The owners of thunderjet sell the uhmw under mills manufacturing. The vaccuum and uhmw welder will cost you 20 grand. Mills sells the stuff by 10 sheet lots. Pretty expensive to have retrofitted. The stuff isn't a holy grail, you need to have a decent bottom, but it is sure slippery on gavel, the drift boats are moving slow, therfore 3/32'' is ample. 3/8'' should be the minimum on a jet. Hope this helps.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by pineridge View Post
    The uhmw that phantom and most of the indusry is using comes from linktech in michigan. You can not glue uhmw to anything and make it last! Uhmw is too dense. Linktech has a patented product,it has the uhmw with a fiber glass backing pressed into it making it adherable. The aluminum must be sandblasted and clean and it is very temperature specific to glue on. It is at about 5 lbs. Of vaccuum. You can see it on thunderjets website under new products. The owners of thunderjet sell the uhmw under mills manufacturing. The vaccuum and uhmw welder will cost you 20 grand. Mills sells the stuff by 10 sheet lots. Pretty expensive to have retrofitted. The stuff isn't a holy grail, you need to have a decent bottom, but it is sure slippery on gavel, the drift boats are moving slow, therfore 3/32'' is ample. 3/8'' should be the minimum on a jet. Hope this helps.
    Pineridge, obviously you seem to know some about the process. True, you cannot glue UHMW by itself to anything. But it has been a proven application with linktechs patented process of adhearing the fiberglass into the uhmw. This gives the structural adhesive something to bond to. You can find a vacuum set up that will perform to the specs required for around $300, and as far as a plastic welder, a used high quality machine will set you back a little, around $5000. The shape of the bottom is very key, thats why it is only truley only cost effective to apply to a newly constructed boat. Unless, someone loves their boat ALOT, and has money to spare. Im curious what you would consider to be the holy grail in regards to jet boat bottom protection?

  19. #19

    Smile

    I'm still looking for the holy grail. Some of the canadian wild men swear by t-1 plating with the graphite paint coating, any one out there have any input? I still am looking for more feedback on the uhmw glue on.

  20. #20

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    my freind Randy Quincey owns half of alaska air boats and applies this plastic' the same materials and system applied with a vacuum and can be repaired in small sections and plastic welded so you don't see a seam don't have his work number on hand he also has guide service thats called gold rush classics should be easy to find

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