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Thread: Berry suggestions

  1. #1
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    Default Berry suggestions

    I live on the Kenai Peninsula and recently purchased a different home. This place has much space for gardening both fenced and non-fenced. I am interested in planting/transplanting some berries or other low maintenance food producing plants, preferably native to Alaska or northern areas. I would welcome any ideas or suggestions. I grew up on a farm and would like to get back into growing food/canning, etc. so my young children can get involved and enjoy the fruits of their labor and pass it on to their generations.

    Also, if I transplant wild rasberries, is fall or spring better?

    Would I be better suited to buy domestic type berries or transplant wild? (would wild varieties yield as much fruit as domestic/other varieties?)

    Does anybody know where to get salmonberries? I remember enjoying these years ago while working out on the Aleutian chain. Will they grow well on the peninsula?

    Thank you for your time and suggestions!

  2. #2
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    I live in the valley and have planted rasberries ,currants and gooseberries while the wild plants will produce the plants you buy usually will bear more an larger berries ,spring is my prefered time to plant but I like to prep the planting area well ahead of time.If you do a little checking I'm sure there are people who will help out with starts for rasberries.

  3. #3
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    Default Black Berry Experiment

    I'd like to experiment with blackberries. Anyone try that? I've got rasberries coming out the wazzo, but don't care for them much.

    BP

  4. #4
    Member Michael's Avatar
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    I tried blackberries and boysenberries in Chugiak 15+ years ago. They didn't work real well. I think the problem is that Black and Boysenberries are a 'vining' type. That is, you train the vines to a trellis and the fruit sets on last years growth. Raspberries on the other hand are a 'cane' type and set fruit on this years growth which comes from the root crown each spring. I think the vines just get too frozen for too long.

    But hey, that was 15 years ago, and with global warming....who knows.

    Good luck!

  5. #5
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    the raspberry plants I have bear on last years growth,and we have little die back.Blackberries and boysenberries just aren't hardy enough without a lot of extra care .If one was willing to lay the plants down and cover them all winter you might be able to get some berries.Alex

  6. #6
    Member Michael's Avatar
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    Senior Moment You're right Alex. Last years growth bears the fruit. Last years bearers are what we cut away.

    I agree on the blackberries, but what a lot of work.

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