Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Dry bags?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Orting, WA
    Posts
    14

    Default Dry bags?

    My cousin and I are going on a float trip for moose in 2009. Any sugestions for dry bags. Brand? Size? etc. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,449

    Default

    If you buy cheap ones, be sure to pack everything in garbage bags inside your dry bags. Usually cheap ones make it through one trip if you're careful. It's the second trip where you notice most of the leaks.

    I have some Sotar bags that I like a lot. Very tough and they seal well. NRS also makes some good heavy duty bags.

    I also have some bags made with thin waterproof nylon that work well if you can keep them from wear and punctures. Hard to do though. I believe sea kayakers prefer them because they conform to the shape of the hull better. But I prefer heavy PVC or Urethane bags.

    Also, tall bags are difficult to work with. Anything you want is inevitably on the bottom, and you have to stand on your head to dig it out. Short wide bags are easier to work with, but narrow bags are easier to get to seal up tight. You make your own choices. I usually group everything in smaller stuff bags inside one large "camp" dry bag. For instance, I usually have one of these smaller bags that has everything I know I'll need while in the tent, and another with a change of clothes, and another with my sleeping bag & pillow, etc. I pack things I will need in camp first on top. I also use a separate smaller "day" dry bag that I keep on the boat, and inside are things like rain gear, sunscreen, bug dope, fleece jacket, gloves, etc. I like to use the same system all the time so I know were things are, and a little bit of planning makes camping a lot easier.

    Also while we are on the topic, never just roll down a roll down closure. Always fold them. There is an art to it, and if you get it right they won't leak. Pack the bag about 3/4 full. Flatten out the top (front to back) and make straight creases down the sides to avoid wrinkles later. Fold twice, and press the air out by smashing it (an extra large belly helps here). Stand it up, straighten it back out, and continue folding. The last few folds may turn into a roll, but it's the first few that matter. Then tighten up with the straps. It "should" work.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Seattle Sports makes nice, durable, (heavy) dry bags. They're tough and available in lots of sizes at places like Sports Authority. I prefer smaller bags and accept that I need more of them. I like the Sea-to-Summit bags. REI, Barney's, AMH, etc have them. They also make a really nice compression sack for sleeping bags and they offer several sizes. My 20* down bag fits in the XS size. The Sea-to-Summit bags don't have exhaust valves so Jim's advice is good advice. Get the air out.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    221

    Default

    I've had several different sized seal-line roll top dry bags that I've used for several years. As long as I do my part and properly seal them up, they always kept my stuff dry. I especially like the smaller day pack sized bag for keeping some stuff more accessible and for day trips in the boat.

  5. #5

    Default

    Try Cabela's XPG Extreme, Simms WX-Tex or comparable type bag that has an air valve. It gives you the ability to keep air in for floatation or to let all the air out for more space-saving. They would work well for your float trip, as I use them for kayaking and am pleased with the versatility they offer when I go backpacking and need things compressed for space.

  6. #6
    Member Casper50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    627

    Default

    The clear ones are nice. You can see what's in them.

  7. #7
    Member Stanly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    954

  8. #8

    Default

    Outdoor Research has some interesting drybags on their website, one of which is a pack liner. They also have an oddball one that sounds useful: a drybag that is also a compression stuffsack & a daypack. I saw one at a local used sporting goods store and thought it was too big for general backpacking, but it might work for hunting.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Orting, WA
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I guess I have some research/work to do now. Thanks to everyone for all the great info.

  10. #10
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    I've alway found that the military waterproof bags work just as well as anything.
    Now what ?

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Valdez, AK
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Sea to Summit makes some dry bags. I am pleased with my Ultra Sil Dry sack, though you might want something a bit more durable, but it is completely waterproof. They also make some that eVent which for my sleeping bag and have had no leaks.

    Jason

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    614

    Default

    to be honest, a friend and I used the yellow ones at walmart, and they worked great. we did a float on the alagnak. they worked great. we weren't tossing them from the boat onto rocks every time.

  13. #13
    Member summitx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    400

    Default

    I also have used the yellow one from walmart, and it worked great, wish they had a bigger one

  14. #14

    Default

    I used a Seattle Sports Hydrovent a few weeks ago. I borrowed it from a friend and was happy with it. It fit 2 sleeping bags and clothes for 2 people for 6 days. If you think you'll be carrying the bag any distance, such as from boat / canoe to camp site, etc, I strongly suggest getting one with shoulder straps. Makes them much easier to tote around.

  15. #15
    Member aksnowshoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    interior Alaska
    Posts
    158

    Default

    try Cabellas, they have great dry bags.

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Lubbock, Texas
    Posts
    6

    Default

    We are going to be switching our dry bags to Sea to Summit soon, but we currently carry SealLine, and they are great. No problems and they are super durable. We are just switching because of price-points.
    It depends was how durable you want. Those Silcoat Nylon dry bags are good, but in my opinion you can't really throw around. If you are wanting waterproof and breathable, go with an E-vent or goretex waterproof dry sack... Sea to summit makes them pretty sure. Otherwise, they are all pretty much the same. I have used SealLine dry sacs for 10 years and have never had problems with them at all. Super durable.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •