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Thread: Hunting in Tok

  1. #1
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    Default Hunting in Tok

    I am moving back to Alaska after my job took me outside for a few years, and I am strongly considering the Tok area. Does anyone have any experience hunting moose and maybe caribou in this area?

  2. #2
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    Default TOK

    I know this is not moose or caribou related. But Tok is unique, hunting wise, in that you can legally bait for brown bears there-at least last I heard. THe limit is 2 a year. I have always wanted to go down and bait for brownies there. I just don't have enough time to devot to that right now there....anyways enjoy

  3. #3
    Member GreginAlaska's Avatar
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    A few years ago I got a bull moose right by the weigh station...problem is; it was not in season and I got it with the gooseneck trailer I was hauling.
    “When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty.” attributed to Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
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    Default Tok

    Well if you hit one near the weigh station, then they must be around!

  5. #5
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    Default

    The biggest draw back to hunting aound Tok is the large amount of private land (mainly Native land) where hunting by you will not be allowed. Between the two regional corporations (Athna & Doyon), five village corporations and the reservation there is alot of land the is locked up around Tok. The moose population is not that great especially north of Tok in 20E. Hence the 2 bear grizz/yr. Tok sits in 12 and has a 1 grizz limit. The baiting is in 20E under a predator control program with a total harvest limit somewheres above 200. The caribou hunting is mainly the 40 mile herd and it gets pounded. This year the fall season lasted less then a week. Winters are very cold. Was 73 below last winter.

  6. #6

    Default Ditto

    What John said. He summed it up very well.

  7. #7
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    Default Hunting Tok

    Your responses are appreciated and duly noted. I assumed that the generous predator limits were an effort to limit calf predation and an attempt to boost low numbers.

  8. #8

    Default yes on the predator control

    but in reality, it hasn't increased the harvest of grizzly by much. It is difficult country for the most part. Baiting of them was very unsuccessful.

  9. #9

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    Hunting in the winter should help with the ability to track the bears in the snow. I have great luck in tracking bears no a fresh snow.

  10. #10
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    Yeah, baiting them is frustrating. By the time we could even get in to my buddies moose camp, the cows were dropping. we had a really nice bear just walk right past our bait, guess it had fresh groceries on its mind.

    Did see quite a few moose and caribou in the valley though.

  11. #11

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    The bears and the wolves around Tok really need some pounding. Went on a fly-in moose hunt with 40 Mile Air this year, got dropped on a lake so we didn't do a lot of hiking to keep our scent to a minimum...just sticking close to camp, and hiking no farther than about 1/4 - 1/2 mile to glass, we came across at least six adult moose skeletons from this past winter or spring. That's SIX adult moose, killed in the past year, in a very small area. I can't imagine how many more we might have found, had we ventured further.

  12. #12

    Default our problem with snow

    is that alot of the bears aren't out when the snow is still on the ground and the area is SUPER hard to track as most of it is forested and makes it nearly impossible to cover a lot of ground. The local guys are doing their best to keep the wolf #'s down. It takes time, but I think it is working.

  13. #13

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    If looking for bear near Tok go to mile 21 on the Taylor Highway across from the gravel pit. Take the ATV trail to crossroads with a trapping line ATV trail near the marsh. Hang a right and go about 1 mile until the trail deadends near a mound at a marsh area. This mound is a bear den that had several fresh bones outside. I left it alone during moose, but for the bear hunters out there feel free to target. Tons of sign around.

  14. #14
    Member GreginAlaska's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kodiak87 View Post
    Well if you hit one near the weigh station, then they must be around!
    Ya, you would think so...hopefully I didn't kill the last one around.
    “When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty.” attributed to Thomas Jefferson

  15. #15

    Default Basically

    from Tok almost to the border is all private land on both sides of the road. There will be more private land up the Taylor once all land selections with the state, feds, and native groups have been conveyed. The Taylor Highway hunting will get "small" before we all know it.

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