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Thread: Tarp Treatment

  1. #1

    Question Tarp Treatment

    For those who tarp up, is there something that can be applied to the tarp to help prevent snow from sticking? I always have pockets that form because the snow won't shed off.
    We never really grow up, we only learn
    how to act in public

  2. #2

    Talking

    I tried a drop-light one year, figuering it would generate some heat in the engine compartment, the bulb just kept dieing. It won't generate enough heat anyway for the entire boat area, but a little heater might kept the snow melted off. I have a small cheap electric heater that has a tip-switch and the face won't burn you if you touch it. I use it to dry the cab after trips, be careful the extension cord doesn't melt. A less expensive thing I use now is a broom, it has a long stick-like handle with a brush on the end. You push the snow off as it piles on the tarp, swearing while you do this helps keep you warm.

  3. #3

    Default

    I heard of someone who kept a heater in his boat with the idea of it helping keep the snow off the tarp. He ended up with a tarp covered in ice. Yes, swearing helps. But then again, when has it ever hurt?

  4. #4

    Default

    Good point Skydiver, I'll go with the broom/swearing routine! Murphy's law got my last year; Kept it swept everyweek, then of course went to Hawaii for two weeks during a record snow fall, came back to find it buried beyond imagination!

  5. #5

    Wink I was thinking along a different line

    Something like a non-stick spray like PAM, or WD40. I'm throwing stuff in the dark I know, but, hey somebody might have tried it. Heat is not an option. I'll try PAM and report back after the first snow fall.
    We never really grow up, we only learn
    how to act in public

  6. #6

    Question

    Just a thought: Before you commit a tarp to oil treatment and make a potential mess of it, how about testing it out with a smaller section??? WD40 was invented to displace water (Water Disappator -formula number forty, or something like that...) but I believe it will evaporate to readily. Cooking spray would probably stick better, but oil or grease in the cold gets "thick". Snow or water won't bead up if its cold and freezing. Hockey skates, skis, and sleds, generate heat melting the snow immediately to create glide. Days that are extremely cold do not allow for that glide to happen. I don't know if an "oil" type product will beat the cold or not. It sounds like a great science experiment and now I am curious!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Fairbanks
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    216

    Default

    I figure it is a boat, it is designed to get wet. We just cover the seats and console in our XS and don't worry about the rest... eventually all the snow melts and drains out, leaving, of course, a mess of birch leaves and spruce needles.

  8. #8

    Default slope it

    build a wood frame under the tarp to pitch it at 45 degrees & use tie ropes to stretch tight...........snow slides off & no ponding when it melts.

    my frame is a 20 foot 2 x 4 that rests on top of the outboard engine & windshield with 2 posts in between

  9. #9

    Red face Same setup

    Quote Originally Posted by titobandito View Post
    build a wood frame under the tarp to pitch it at 45 degrees & use tie ropes to stretch tight...........snow slides off & no ponding when it melts.

    my frame is a 20 foot 2 x 4 that rests on top of the outboard engine & windshield with 2 posts in between
    I make a 20' long sawhorse with 7' legs. One set in the bow and one in the stern. I then strtch bungies from the gunnel up to the ridge board to provide some support under the tarp and resist sagging. It has more like a 50-60 degree slope. But snow still sticks to it like white on rice. I probably need a newer/slicker tarp maybe. Dunno.
    We never really grow up, we only learn
    how to act in public

  10. #10

    Default

    That might be a possibility, some old tarps get like a wool sweater after awhile.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AkRascal View Post
    I figure it is a boat, it is designed to get wet. We just cover the seats and console in our XS and don't worry about the rest... eventually all the snow melts and drains out, leaving, of course, a mess of birch leaves and spruce needles.
    My take on that is that boats are designed to get wet, but on the outside. For a fiberglass boat (don't know about metal ones), you can get water seeping into places it doesn't belong and then through freezing and thawing you can have problems come up. And I've heard of people who've had to wait for a solid block of ice to melt in the spring from all the melted and then frozen water in their boat.

    I build a wooden frame that goes from bow to stern. Then take 2-3 1" (I think) PVC pipes that go from from the bowrail on one side of the boat, up over the frame top, and then back down to the bow rail on the other side of the boat. Kind of like ribs. Cut slots into PVC T fittings and snap them over the rails. Then the PVC pipe slips into the open T fitting. I still have some places where the snow tend to not want to slide off, but overall it works out pretty good. And I always wash and then dry the boat before I tarp it. Also with a setup like this, you can continue to work on your boat in late fall/early spring when it's still snowing.

    Doug - you might try silicon spray. Just a thought.

  12. #12

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Doug - you might try silicon spray. Just a thought.
    Yep. That's the route I'm going to try. Thanks.
    We never really grow up, we only learn
    how to act in public

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