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Thread: Yukon River

  1. #1

    Default Yukon River

    hey all, im looking for any information anyone can give me on the river from end to end. I would like to know how far in alaska i could take it without having to ditch my canoe. Or if its possible to make it to fairbanks or further.
    Thx Erick

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  3. #3

    Default I paddled from Whitehorse to Dawson a few years ago

    and will do it again next summer...In Whitehorse you put-in at the Robert Service camp ground...You can paddle almost the entire 1800 miles to saltwater..Take out on the other end is near a village that cargo planes service that you can put yer boat on to fly out..can't remember the name...for more detailed info on the saltwater end contact ...http://www.kck.org/ and post yer questions there I kow a few folks on that board have gone all the way...good luck

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    "Paddling the Yukon River and its Tributaries" is a guidebook to paddling the entire Yukon River from end to end. It will have all the info you need. One source is www.yukonbooks.com, although Amazon and the Outdoors Forum sell it, too.

  5. #5

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    thanks a bunch!

  6. #6

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    Yeah that would help. Hopefully the plane isn't too pricey...

  7. #7

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    ill definitely buy that book. thx

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    Thumbs up I bought that book right here on *this* web site

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoejunkie View Post
    ill definitely buy that book. thx
    Me too. I just bought that book myself; I found it for sale here:
    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...roducts_id=105
    ...and I've had first rate service in the past buying things on this web site.

    Let's give back to those that provide this great forum for us (for free) by choosing them as the place to buy products we need that they sell.

    ...my 2 pennies...

  9. #9
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    Also "Two in a Red Canoe". authors Hage/Baldino. More of a story and pictorial than a river log, but would be very useful for planning a river trip. Overview: Guy and gal start at Lake Laberge in Yukon Territory and spend the whole summer canoeing down the Yukon.

  10. #10

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    this will help, thx!

  11. #11

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    Canoejunkie...Why did you need a floatplane for the Yukon...where do you plan to start (put-in)...just curious..You must read Burton's book on the history of the gold rush...Klondike Fever...

  12. #12

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    i wanna canoe from about yellowknife to as far as i can get and if the only way is to fly my canoes out i hope its not too pricey, but i think it is.

  13. #13

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    yellowknife??? (while there is some great canoeing to be had flying out of yellowknife, none of it comes even remotely close to the yukon river.)

    perhaps you mean whitehorse?

    i think your best bet is to look on amazon.com for books on paddling the yukon. there have been LOTS of books written just about that. there are guide books for sale. get 4 or 5 and have a good read this winter. then you will have a some knowledge as to where the river starts and ends and what lies between.

    where would you be coming from? north america or elsewhere? you can get your canoe air-freighted out of just about any village. but, it will be costly and it will not happen on YOUR timeline. it'll happen whenever there happens to be a plane big enough that happens to land there to haul it. it might be a week, it might be a month. you'd have to arrange for someone to lay it against their house and haul it to the airport, assuming the guy gets word in time that the plane is coming.... ANYTHING is possible, it only takes money.

    it sounds like this is kind of "trip of a lifetime" for you. and it will be that. don't get hungup on the details. buy a decent canoe, maybe a used one, ($600 to $1,200), read some of the many books written (then come back here and ask specific questions that concern you), drive to whitehorse (or, better yet, just fly there and buy your canoe there), paddle paddle paddle, and, at the end of the journey, give the canoe to the first person in the village you finish at who gives you a nice "hello", get on the plane, fly to fairbanks or bethel, and get on the jet to go to wherever home is. (keep your paddle—you can hang it on the wall.)

    -m

  14. #14
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Good Idea

    or, better yet, just fly there and buy your canoe there), paddle paddle paddle, and, at the end of the journey, give the canoe to the first person in the village you finish at who gives you a nice "hello", get on the plane, fly to fairbanks or bethel, and get on the jet to go to wherever home is. (keep your paddle—you can hang it on the wall.)
    Great Idea Gulkana..
    There are also some movies done of floating the Yukon, some done back in the 70's etc. by some hippie types.. made a raft like they did in the old days with a tent on it etc.. wood stove and all the gear,, getting stuck on sandbars,, staying the winter in a cabin they built using the logs from the raft.. dog mushing the rest of the way during the winter..
    some of them gave up ,, and I think it ended up being a bust,,but I have not seen the movie in 15 years,,so ,, I dunno..
    anyway,, you can get into it as much as you want,,, you can even ride a bike down the frozen river like some did back in the gold rush,,
    make the adventure yours...
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Member AlbertJohnson's Avatar
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    Talking

    Now ya'll got me thinking about this. Good way to break my new soon to be wife in. :-)
    Bought that 2 in a Red Canoe book, should be here this week.

    I met up with 2 hikers/travelers in Dawson. They were
    from Germany. They talked me into keeping their truck while
    they canoed from Dawson to Eagle, then i drove their truck
    to them to Eagle.

    What a great 1 day adventure. Though i think i would have liked to have camped along the way. They floated/canoed straight there. It was about 100 miles.

    Anyone know how fast the Yukon is? I'd guess 4-5 miles per hour?

  16. #16

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    << Anyone know how fast the Yukon is? I'd guess 4-5 miles per hour?>>>

    more like 7 to 8 to 9mph.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    Great Idea Gulkana..
    There are also some movies done of floating the Yukon, some done back in the 70's etc. by some hippie types.. made a raft like they did in the old days with a tent on it etc.. wood stove and all the gear,, getting stuck on sandbars,, staying the winter in a cabin they built using the logs from the raft.. dog mushing the rest of the way during the winter..
    Max
    What you are referring to is the book and movie by Keith Tryck, Yukon Passage: Rafting 2000 Miles to the Bering Sea (1980)
    They are Alaskans and it is a very good book. Far from a bust. Well worth reading and viewing.
    akraven

  18. #18

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    great!! thanks everyone. keep posting!

  19. #19
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default Yukon passage

    I got the movie from the Kenai library and had anouther look.. Its a National Geographic production. with James Stewart doing the talking most of the time..
    It was filmed in 1976 and made for view in 1977. ( Big Hair , Bell bottoms)
    anyway..
    On the face of it, this appears to be a video retracing the footsteps of the 1898 Yukon territory gold rush. And, it is that; This National Geographic film is strikingly unlike any other I have ever seen. For starters, it is tracking 4 guys who, for reasons they have a lot of trouble explaining (though they keep trying), have set out for a year-long trek into the Yukon. The second is it is clearly a product of the latter 1970s with lots of hair, Jimmy Stewart narrating, and a repeatedly expressed world view which sounds painfully naive today. Match that with 20-somethings expressing those views with the mannerisms of a 70 year old, and you've got National Geographic's Yukon Passage.
    In 1898, tens of thousands of men from the US went to the Yukon in the hopes of striking gold. The trip was long, arduous, and strangely enough, helpfully supervised at certain stages by Canadian Mounties. In 1976, four young men set out to repeat this 1800 mile treck.
    National Geographic filmed their expedition, including some of the worst pitfalls, and the result is the Yukon Passage, originally released in 1977 and narrated by Jimmy Stewart. the video was re-released in 1998, a century after the Yukon gold rush.
    This trip happened in an era near the twilight of the world recognizable from the original expedition could still be found and before our modern world swept away a lot of the isolation which preserved cultural differences. The cast of characters on this trip is a little like a bizarre version of the team in Predator. There is a cleanliness obsessed continuous tooth brusher, a grandson of an original Yukon miner, one they call "Slacker," and the guy who speaks like he is 80 years old and telling the others how they ought to do things. But don't get the idea any of them have it easy- They happily go from one backbreaking task to another with an easy can-do attitude apparently perfectly suited to this adventure.
    The original forest where the 1898 rush miners pulled logs to build rafts from is gone, and even 80 years later in 1977, it is clearly going to be another century or more before anything approaching a real forest will be seen, there. So the four have to go far away from the river to find trees for their own raft. They felled 20, then spent two days dragging them to the river.
    And here the oddly naive and self-obsessive views of the 1970s start to peek out. One comment while cutting trees is about how it is perfect work, since you get paid and can come and go from the job to do your own thing. And this is being said where, quite literally, over a lifetime hasn't been enough time to produce more than thin saplings where adventurers cut down a forest.
    There is an interesting scene where they build a 10 ton raft and head down the river. And in amongst snags threatening to rip the raft apart, "Sweepers" (low lying trees hanging over the river which could brush everything and everyone off the top of the raft into the river), they make a fair bit of the journey. But the raft quickly gets banged up and by the time they get to Dawson, it needs major repairs.
    And, quite remarkably, they are able to get a can-can show and the video implies they get a lot more than that. And, I have to say I was wondering if this part was staged.
    The next stop is a surprise- they hunker down for winter and offload their supplies, which finally explains why the raft was 10 tons- the supplies even include a cast iron stove (and not one of the little pot-bellied ones). The next thing you know, they have settled in and built a log cabin with an adjacent sauna. So, soon they are living a life of leisure, steam baths, jumping into the freezing river, and then one night, one looks out and says, "Uh guys, the sauna's on fire." Yep- sure enough, the sauna is on fire- but they don't show the aftermath of this peculiar interlude.
    The next ten minutes are fairly slow with a few interviews about how they are free, the women in their lives need to understand it, and so on. If I hadn't seen the footage of them offloading the cast iron stove, I'd have guessed the massive 10 ton weight total of the raft had a very different cause. I would have rather seen some explanation of what went wrong with the sauna.
    The final leg of the trip comes with a surprise- an Inuit picks them up and takes them the rest of the way by dog sled. The trip includes neat dog sled care tips like how the dogs' paws can fill up with ice and need to be cleared.
    And the Inuit hunter's family is waiting to greet their guide when he gets home. And that seemed to suggest there was maybe a more interesting story there. But, we have the four amateur adventurers in place of the people who face that environment for a living in this video, that that's actually the opportunity which lets us compare ourselves today with who we were.
    In the midst of this video, Jimmy Stewart mentions the dates as time goes by during the trip. And one of the dates is September 11, which, of course, meant nothing to them in 1977. It was a point where the question is less about whether these voices from our past were naive, or if the truth is more the modern audience is cynical.
    The Yukon Passage is peculiar and offbeat compared to the other National Geographic videos I have seen. But in the midst of this unusual treatment is a look at who we are now by comparing with who we were. And the video is very educational, as well as definitely entertaining.
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  20. #20

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    I saw that show when it first came out and enjoyed it alot...I'm sure some of it was staged...now that I think back I wonder why it took them so long to make that trip?...you can still see a can can show in Dawson City at Diamond Gurity's....Anyone interested in the goldrush and the Yukon should read Burton's Klondike Fever ...I could hardly put it down, a real page turner..

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